Thursday Continued

 

Thursday, April 2, 2020

 

WS24 Integrating Hypnosis and Biofeedback for Pain Management and Related Disorders
Time: 1:00pm to 5:00pm
CE Credits: 4
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Intermediate
Session Focus: 80% Clinical/20% Research
Target Audience: The target audience includes anyone who is curious about the use of clinical hypnosis along with those who address the needs of individuals with chronic pain and related disorders.

In spite of distinctly different histories, Biofeedback and Clinical Hypnosis have long been considered twin pillars in the field of self-regulation.Both are primarily adjunctive techniques which provide patients with skills that promote self-empowerment and enhance self-regulation skills. This workshop with introduce new opportunities to select when hypnosis or biofeedback might be a preferred modality and when the combination of these two approaches may be the best approach. Relevant research will be reviewed and video and live demonstrations will be used to provide examples of each approach. Core elements of clinical hypnosis will be reviewed along with recommendations for developing a fully integrative approach to providing care for those suffering from chronic pain and related disorders.

Learning Objectives:

· summarize basic hypnosis theory and technique.
· observe demonstrations of both biofeedback and hypnosis applied to pain management and related problems.
· differentiate when biofeedback or hypnosis might be the preferred approach to treatment.
· design client-centered approaches to pain management.

Speaker(s):

· Eric Willmarth, PhD, Saybrook University: Eric K. Willmarth, PhD, has enjoyed a 40-year career in Psychophysiology and Clinical Psychology, primarily in the field of pain management. He is the past president and the president-elect of the Society for Psychological Hypnosis (APA Div. 30) as well as the past president of the American Society of Clinical Hypnosis, the Society of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis and the Michigan Society for Behavioral Medicine and Biofeedback. He is a Senior Fellow of BCIA and Co-Chair of the Department of Applied Psychophysiology in the College of Integrative Medicine and Health Sciences, Saybrook University. Dr. Willmarth has enjoyed a 40-year career in Psychophysiology and Clinical Psychology, primarily in the field of pain management. He is the past president and the president-elect of the Society for Psychological Hypnosis (APA Div. 30) as well as the past president of the American Society of Clinical Hypnosis, the Society of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis and the Michigan Society for Behavioral Medicine and Biofeedback. He is a Senior Fellow of BCIA and Co-Chair of the Department of Applied Psychophysiology in the College of Integrative Medicine and Health Sciences, Saybrook University. He has combined clinical psychology, hypnosis and biofeedback for decades to enhance the outcome for patients with chronic pain and related conditions.

· Donald Moss, PhD, Saybrook University: Donald Moss, PhD, BCB, is Dean, College of Integrative Medicine and Health Sciences, at Saybrook University, Oakland, CA. There he has built training programs in biofeedback, clinical hypnosis, integrative mental health, wellness coaching, and integrative/functional nutrition. Dr. Moss is the Education Chair of the Society for Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis (SCEH). He is also the ethics chair and international certification chair for the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance. He has served as president of Division 30 (hypnosis) of the American Psychological Association, SCEH, and the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback (AAPB).

 

WS25 Stress: Putting the Puzzle Together
Time: 1:00pm to 5:00pm
CE Credits: 4
Track: Basic Science
Level: Introductory
Session Focus: 50% Clinical/50% Research
Target Audience: This workshop can benefit all levels of practitioners and students

Stress affects every major body system and contributes to 95% of disease. This workshop is designed to provide the participate with a foundation of the physiology of stress and integrate the newest research on how stress manifests in the body’s organ systems. There will be sections on stress and the brain, the brain- gut-gut brain axis, stress and the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems, stress and the musculoskeletal system, the microbiome, the immune system, and the emerging fields of neuropsychoimmunology and epigenetics.
 
We will explore novel neurotransmitters and how many pharmacologic interventions for common diseases such as diabetes and hypertension are actually treating the stress response.  The role of stress and inflammation in Alzheimer’s  and cardiovascular disease will be discussed.
 
The role of the environment and diet in causing and relieving stress will be explored.
 
The physiology and mechanisms of how to turn off the stress response and develop resilience will be explored.
 
We will look at the role of biofeedback and describe various tools to both relieve stress and use stress to improve performance and resilience.
 
We will briefly discuss the role of stress in pain and pain control.
 
This workshop will be experiential as well as didactic.

Learning Objectives:

· The participant will be able to describe the physiology of the stress response
· The participant will be able to describe the effect of stress on the microbiome
· The participant will be able to list effects of early life stress
· The participant will be able to list diseases in which biofeedback has been shown to be helpful
· The participant will be able to list effects of low CO2
· The participant will be able to list scientifically validated stress management techniques

Speaker(s):

· Jan Newman, AAS, BS, MD, MA, FACS, ABIHM, Graduate School of Behavior Health Sciences: Dr. Jan B. Newman received her M.D. from SUNY Downstate Medical Center, surgical training at UTMB Galveston and University of Vermont. She is a fellow of the American College of Surgeons and board certified in Integrative and Holistic Medicine. She has studied and practiced meditation, Yoga, Buddhism and biofeedback in the U.S and in India for over 30 years. She is President of International Stress Management Association - US.. She is dedicated to the integration of sound medical practice with scientifically based multimodality stress reduction for disease mitigation and prevention. She is an internationally requested speaker and has presented on topics including Stress: Manifestations, Mechanisms, and Management, Spirituality and Health, the Relationship of Stress and Disease, Oxytocin the Anti-Stress Hormone, Cardiopulmonary Anatomy and Physiology and the response of the Cardiopulmonary System to Stress. She works in geriatric preventative medicine. She teaches online at the Graduate School of Behavioral Health Sciences.

 

KEY01 Placebos in the Therapy Encounter: From Neurobiology to Clinical Pearls
Time: 6:30pm-7:45pm
CE Credits: 1
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Intermediate
Session Focus: 50% Clinical/50% Research
Target Audience: All health providers working with patients. 

In this presentation, Dr. Morales will review some of the proposed mechanisms behind the placebo effect, its implications for clinical research and to expose the disadvantage of the so called “placebo shame” when industry moves away from failed clinical trials. Dr. Morales-Quezada will also review the bio-psychological basis of placebo as a treatment option for some neurological conditions, particularly when used in associative learning and expectations. Available evidence in neurofeedback research will be presented and discussed, highlighting the statistical significance of the placebo group when used to compared neurofeedback effects and how researchers can control for it. The speaker will present clinical data from the use of placebo as “therapeutic” intervention in pain and other neurological conditions and will examine the ethics behind treatment expectations and clinician behaviors favoring the placebo effect.

Learning Objectives:

· Attendees will be able to define three possible causes of the placebo effect in clinical research
· Attendees will understand the role of expectations and conditioning in promoting the placebo effect
· Attendees providing clinical care will understand the ethical limitation of placebos

Speaker(s):

· Leon Morales-Quezada, MD, MSc, PhD, MPH, Associate Director Spaulding Neuromodulation Center, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital and Harvard Medical School: Leon Morales-Quezada, MD, MSc, PhD, MPH, is a physician-scientist with experience in neurocognitive rehabilitation, noninvasive neuromodulation, applied psychophysiology, and technology development for neurological rehabilitation. Dr. Morales-Quezada received his MD degree from Universidad Autonoma de Aguascalientes Medical School and completed his clinical training in emergency medicine and intensive care. While working in the intensive care environment, Dr. Morales-Quezada realized that, while most of his patients would survive their medical conditions, their quality of life would be poor. For this reason, he decided to learn more about neurological rehabilitation and neuroplasticity, which led him to the USA. He completed a fellowship and Masters in Neuropsychology Rehabilitation at Touro College, and his PhD in Cognitive Neurosciences from De Montfort University in Leicester UK. Dr. Morales-Quezada obtained a Master’s in Public Health from Harvard School of Public Health, and simultaneously completed a fellowship in Integrative Medicine from the Harvard-NIH/NCCIH program, at the Division of General Medicine and Primary Care at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital (SRH), Harvard Medical School. Dr. Morales-Quezada’s research interests focus on noninvasive neuromodulation applied to neurological and cognitive rehabilitation, the role of placebos in pain control, and phenotyping the placebo effect using neurophysiological measures.

 

Welcome Reception (Exhibits Open)
Time: 7:45 pm to 9:30pm

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