Friday Schedule

 

Friday, November 6, 2020

Time: 6:30am-7:30am
Yoga/Meditation

 

Time: 7:00am-6:30pm
Registration

 

Continental Breakfast in Expo Hall
Time: 7am-8am

 

Exhibits Open
Time: 7am-2:00pm

 

ORAL3 Oral Presentations - Session 3
Time: 8am-9am
CE Credits: 1
Track: Hot Topics
Level: Intermediate
Session Focus:
Target Audience: All

1. Z-score training in heroin addiction recovery, Andrea Araujo, PhD, RCC, BCN, Neurotherapist, Psychotherapist at Empower Health/Numinus Inc; Lecturer, UBC

This case study employed the use of Z-score neurofeedback training with a 19 channel  ElectroCap and BrainMaster Avatar software to reduce cravings, anxiety, and trauma symptoms  in a 35-year-old Caucasian female in recovery from over 15 years of daily opiate use. Both eyes-open and  eyes-closed treatment sessions were conducted, with auditory and visual feedback, using protocols derived  from QEEGs and subcortical brain maps of brain activity in the resting state. A reassessment was  conducted after seven weekly 30 min training sessions, and the comparison between the first and  second assessment showed significant improvements, with a reduction of deviant brainwave activity in both the surface and subcortical activity.  Data from the QEEG Pro Client questionnaire and as well as the Beck Depression Inventory and Beck  Anxiety Index were collected in the first and second assessments. Statistical analysis of  covariance showed that the client achieved a complete elimination in craving and that her anxiety  was markedly reduced. The study supports the effectiveness of neurofeedback training as an  adjunct therapy to traditional recovery group work with those in recovery from heroin addiction.


2. Differences in Quantitative Electroencephalogram(QEEG) analysis according to amnesic Mild Cognitive Impairment type(Encoding and Retrial Failure), Dong Won Kang, PhD, iMediSync Inc.; Soeun Yeo, MD, Chung-Ang University Hosiptal; Young Chul Youn, MD, Chung-Ang University; Seung Wan Kang, iMediSync, Inc.
 

3. Theta beta ratio negatively correlated with surgical performance metric post simulated stressor, Sommer Christie, PhD, Postdoctoral scholar, McGill University

Expert level performance in a skilled motor task, such as in surgery or in sport, is characterized by automaticity of skill execution that encompasses fluency, decreased errors and consistency (Ericsson, 2003; Fitts & Posner, 1967). Consistency of skill execution in elite sport is well known to positively impact performance outcomes and lead to optimal experience and flow (e.g., Milton, Solodkin, Hluštík, & Small, 2007). In surgery, expertise has been studied by exploring the various metrics associated with the performance of expert compared to non-expert surgeons during simulated surgical procedures (e.g., Alotaibi et al., 2015; Bajunaid et al., 2017). A recent study exploring key performance metrics in neurosurgery found that expert surgeons demonstrated higher consistency of force application during virtual reality simulated brain tumors resections (Bugdadi et al., 2014). The objective of this study was to test the relationship between the theta/beta power, as a measure of attentional control, and consistency of force application before and after experiencing a simulated stressor during a virtual reality simulated brain tumor resection. Consistency of force application was decreased by induced stress utilizing a virtual reality tumor resection model. Furthermore, a statistically significant negative correlation was found between post-stress theta/beta power ratio and post-stress consistency of force application. This result implies that stress might affect the surgical performance and attention control. Potential implications for psychophysiological training to optimize surgical performance are discussed.

4. Evaluation of Home based Neurofeedback Training for Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Wasifa Jamal, PhD, Senior Research Scientist, BrainCo; Max Newlon, MEd, President

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and Attention deficit disorder (ADD) are prevalent disorders. Those who suffer from ADHD and ADD have deficits in the areas of attention control, such as the inability to sustain attention over time or attend to stimuli selectively. Neurofeedback protocols have been considered to be efficacious in the treatment of ADHD and most research has resulted in clinical benefit in children. However, high costs and poor access to practitioners and clinics prevent families from obtaining this form of intervention.     For this study families of 18 children, diagnosed with ADHD/ADD, across the US volunteered to participate in a 5 week at home neurofeedback training program. They were of ages 10-17. Children were asked to complete 5 sessions per week, each for 20 minutes. Each training session consisted of a series of high attention and relaxation exercises. During each training session the children wore a wireless portable EEG headband and played the attention and relaxation neurofeedback games from the comfort of their homes. Three electrodes were positioned on the child’s head: active lead at the frontal midline (FZ) site, with ground and reference lead on the left ear. The child’s success during a game depended on his/her ability to remain in a focused (or relaxed) state, depending on the exercise.     The system used a machine learning algorithm to match the user’s EEG signals with the model of a focused task and rewarded higher focus scores with visual and auditory stimuli and lower scores were penalized.    The results show statistically significant (p<0.01) training effects with reduced inattention and hyperactivity and impulsivity in the Connor’s Comprehensive Behaviour Rating Scale (CBRS) parent reports, indicating that ADHD symptoms have reduced over the 5 weeks, 25 sessions of this home based neurofeedback training program.

 

BOS18 Successfully Integrating Applied Psychophysiology Procedures into a Medical Care Environment
Time: 8am-9am
CE Credits: 1
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Intermediate
Session Focus: 90% Clinical/10% Research
Target Audience: Aimed at students and health science professionals interested in the functional integration of interventions based on applied psychophysiology into medical-hospital environments and in multidisciplinary applications of health and medical sciences, either as primary or adjuvant therapy, and always with the goal of improving the quality of life of the patient.

Applied psychophisiology´s potential to modify many physiological functions in a stable and permanent manner towards an adequate state of self-regulation opens enormous possibilities within medical practice to offer - either as primary or adjuvant therapy - more effective therapeutical options, of minimally invasive nature, with fewer side effects and more economical, in the medium and long term, compared to the usual treatments.    However, for years, the struggle to integrate interventions based on applied psychophysiology to medical care schemes has not been as successful as it should have been, erroneously relegating them to a category of alternative or complementary medicine (according to the definition accepted by the National Institutes of Health -NIH-) ignoring its evidence-based nature and making it difficult for medical specialists, hospitals and even insurance institutions to use and accept them. This work proposes possible solutions to the above from the viewpoint of: a) the professional who provides the services of applied psychophysiology, b) the medical specialist who is responsible for offering the patient the possibility of these services forwarding him to the right specialist, c) healthcare institutions (hospitals) and even considers the role played by distributors of equipment in this functional chain, all this from the experience of the author as founder and head for 10 years of the first in-hospital service of applied psychophysiology in Mexico, as well as president of the Medical Bioethics Committee of that institution.

Learning Objectives:

·       Recognize the general situation of Applied Psychophysiology regarding medical care schemes.
·       Analyze the variables that affect the situation of Applied Psychophysiology in medical attention and care schemes.
·       Reflect on the possible solutions that allow these interventions to be considered as viable to be integrated into comprehensive health care schemes.
·       To identify strategies and types of applied psychophysiological intervention - whether evidence-based or potentially effective - that can be integrated into the medical management of a specific condition or set of conditions either as primary or adjuvant therapy, always following the bioethical principles of good practice in health sciences.
·       To implement satisfactory strategies of integration of applied psychophysiology in medical care environments -such as hospitals-; the correct way to integrate to a multidisciplinary team of professionals in health sciences in the attention of patients with multiple etiology conditions.

Speaker(s):

·       David Arroyo, Psic.Npf, BCB, Universidad del Valle de Mexico, Hospital StarMedica Queretaro, Sociedad Mexicana de Bio y Neurorretroalimentación: Clinical specialist and professor with extensive experience in the fields of Clinical, Medical and Health Psychology and Applied Psychophysiology. Founding member of the Mexican Bio and Neurofeedback Society and part of its board of directors for 10 years. For 9 years he was in charge of the Medical Psychology Service of the StarMedica Hospital in Mexico City, where he established the first in-hospital applied psychophysiology service of its kind in his country, integrating it to the management of different psychological and medical disorders in an interdisciplinary manner, in addition to being appointed president of the Medical Bioethics Committee for two consecutive periods; positions he continues to hold at StarMedica Hospital now in the city of Querétaro. He´s also co-founder and CEO of the Mindful Neuroscience Center in Mexico, instructor-mentor in BCIA Accredited Didactic Programs, international instructor of the BFE´s “Learn from the Best” formation programs and leading the Applied Psychophysiology program at the School of Health Sciences in the University of the Valley of Mexico.
 

 

BOS19 Examining Psychotherapeutic Treatment Approach Preference  in a Hispanic Population
Time: 8am-9am
CE Credits: 1
Track: Basic Science (All Levels)
Level: Introductory
Session Focus: 50% Clinical/50% Research
Target Audience: All levels; Information will be presented in such a way that will be appropriate to all audiences.

Minority groups are at a disadvantage when seeking psychological treatment. Interventions are often less effective for minority populations when treatment outcomes are compared to Anglo populations. Studies indicate that the stigma associated with psychological disorders and seeking psychological intervention within these minority subgroups may be at fault for this disparity. In this study, we explored this idea by examining what methods of intervention minorities are more likely to seek out. Participants were given the option to enlist in a biofeedback approach to intervention as well as a treatment as usual psychotherapy (TAU). Participants were drawn from the community population in Utah County via Mountainlands Community Health Center.  Participants were self-identified Hispanic/Latino. Prior to taking part in the study, were asked to indicate their cultural identity based on a series of criteria as well as their perceived stigma associated with mental health interventions. We hypothesized that because biofeedback is often viewed as a more medical and scientific approach to psychological intervention, more Hispanic participants will be more willing to choose biofeedback interventions over individual psychotherapy.  We found that most Latino/Hispanic identified participants chose the biofeedback intervention over the TAU (37 biofeedback; 9 TAU). The second part of the study was qualitative. We interviewed each participant and collected narrative data on their selection choice and their experiences in treatment. Interviews were conducted over the phone and followed the principles of consensual qualitative research (CQR). The data collected in this portion of the study is still being analyzed; however, we are currently finding trends that indicate positive experiences with biofeedback and a decrease in perceived stigma towards mental health after services.

Learning Objectives:

·       To understand the applicability of biofeedback practices to minority populations.
·       To enhance cultural competence in understanding the experiences of minority populations in treatment.
·       To summarize the history of mental health services as it applies to minority groups

Speaker(s):

·       Andrea DeBarros, MS, Brigham Young University: Andrea DeBarros, M.S. is a doctoral candidate in Clinical Psychology at Brigham Young University studying under the mentorship of Patrick Steffen, PhD.  Her research interests include studying the experiences of minority populations in mental health treatment.  She has a clinical interest in Health Psychology and the management of stress and anxiety.

 

BOS20 The Challenge of Habit: Making Meaningful Changes in a Quest to Improve Brain Health
Time: 8am-9am
CE Credits: 1
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Introductory
Session Focus: 70% Clinical/30% Research
Target Audience: Clinicians interested in getting the best out of themselves and their clients

If you could  change three habits to improve your brain health, what would they be? Improved sleep? Better nutrition? Daily meditation? Sounds easy, right? So why isn’t it? Why don’t we just do it? As mental health providers and brain/performance trainers, we are in the business of brain health. But the bottom line is, we often don’t do the very thing that ask of our clients. Yes, that is putting your brain first. While the solution to better health, vitality and well-being seems simple, begins with these habits, for many of us, it is not easy to change! And, if we have difficulty, as experts in the business in brain changing, then it may be difficult for our clients. The problem is that while we know that certain habits lead us to be healthier and happier, we don’t do it? Neuromodulation techniques may assist the brain to change, but when we that is our primary focus, we will miss other factors that can speed up the process and support and nurture continued brain growth. Research in the past few years has been plentiful describing the importance of nutrition, sleep (Fultz, N., et al, 2019), and exercise, as well as, other habits (Isaacson, R., et al 2019) such as meditation/breathing and mindfulness (Lazer, S., et al, 2005) on brain health. This talk summarizes how these habits promote and sustain brain health, including their relation to neuroplasticity.  Finally, a discussion about implementing strategies to strengthen motivation and incorporation of these habits will be offered.

Learning Objectives:

·       identify personal beliefs or concepts that may impede the progress of their clients healthy habits
·       Discuss how healthy habits can improve neuroplasticity
·       Discuss how healthy habits can improve neuroplasticity

Speaker(s):

·       Anne Ward Stevens, PhD, Integrated Neuroscience Services: Anne Stevens, Ph.D., received her doctoral degree from the University of Memphis in 1995. She has held a license to practice Psychology in the state of Tennessee and currently is licensed in Arkansas, and has practiced in Fayetteville since 1989.    Since 2016, Dr. Stevens has been the President of Integrated Neuropsychological Services, with an expertise in head injury and other disorders related to brain functioning. Her practice encompasses neuropsychological and Quantitative EEG Assessment, as well as treatment, primarily through neurofeedback. She has earned board certification through BCIA in Neurofeedback and the QEEG Certification Board for QEEG Technologist.    In addition to her private practice, Dr. Stevens serves on the Scientific Advisory Committee of Neurotopia and the Head Trauma Committee at the University of Arkansas Athletic Department. In 2001, she was also the co-founder of ContreQ, specializing in the assessment and treatment of sport-related concussion.    Dr. Stevens is a member of good standing with the American Psychological Association, the National Academy of Neuropsychology and the International Society of Neurofeedback and Research. Additionally, Dr. Stevens also served on the Board of Directors for the International Society of Neurofeedback and Research from 2008 until 2012.

 

BOS21 An Integrative Psychophysiological Approach to Balance the Gut-Brain Axis
Time: 8am-9am
CE Credits: 1
Track: Hot Topics
Level: Introductory
Session Focus: 50% Clinical/50% Research
Target Audience: - Practitioners looking to be more effective in their work with clients who are struggling with cognitive and mental health challenges  - Individuals interested in new, innovative solutions for optimizing health and wellness  - Individuals interested in learning more about the integration between the brain, mind, and various body systems

Recent research within the fields of medicine, neuroscience, psychiatry, and microbiology has revealed a complex, remarkably interconnected relationship between the brain and gastrointestinal system. The gut-brain axis involves a number of complex feedback loops between the microbiome, intestinal barrier, mucosal immune system, neuroendocrine system, and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, as well as the enteric, autonomic, and central nervous systems. Through these communication channels, signals from the brain can modulate motor, sensory, and secretory functions of the gut, and signals from the gut can influence various aspects of psychological and cognitive function. As such, alterations in one component can trigger a cascade of effects throughout the axis. Exposure to prolonged or excessive stress—from emotional trauma to pathogenic invasion—can produce especially detrimental effects on this axis, leading to chronic physical and psychological disorders.

Failure to adequately address imbalances throughout this axis might inhibit clients’ progress in psychophysiological interventions such as neurofeedback and biofeedback. This presentation will provide an overview of research on the gut-brain axis as it relates to the fields of psychophysiology and mental health, as well as guidance for appropriate intervention using the tools available to us. We will especially examine the impact of stress on the gut-brain axis, as well as the role of this axis in stress-related disorders. We will then discuss practical recommendations for an integrative psychophysiological approach to help clients effectively balance this axis. We will also cover methods for reducing the brain’s stress reactivity, balancing the neuroendocrine system, optimizing microbiota compositions, repairing the gut lining, restoring tight junctions in the blood-brain barrier, ensuring adequate nourishment, and reducing inflammation.

Learning Objectives:

·       Describe the role of the gut-brain axis in various cognitive and mental health disorders
·       Explain the effects of stress on both the gut and brain, as well as how each influences our stress reactivity
·       Discuss the feedback loops that exist between the gut and brain, and how each impacts the other
·       Implement integrative psychophysiological interventions to improve health and mental health outcomes
·       Discuss how various systems in the body are interconnected and impact mental health

Speaker(s):

·       Ashlie Bell, PhD, LCSW, BCN, NeuroGrove: Dr. Ashlie Bell is an internationally renowned brain health expert and owner of an integrative brain wellness center in Colorado called NeuroGrove.  She holds a doctoral degree from the College of Integrative Medicine and Health Sciences at Saybrook University, in addition to being a licensed clinical social worker, researcher, and published author.      Dr. Bell has worked in the fields of health and mental health for over 15 years and is known for her specialized knowledge in brain-based interventions, as well as integrative mental health and the treatment of trauma-related challenges.  She has spent several years investigating the neurophysiological underpinnings of various physical, cognitive, and emotional challenges, as well as the interconnections between the brain and various systems of the body.  As a result, Dr. Bell has dedicated her career to exploring and developing new approaches for healing the brain, mind, and body from prior physical/emotional injury and empowering people to achieve optimal wellness.

 

BOS22 Pilot Use of Capnography in Exercise & Movement with Military Personnel
Time: 8am-9am
CE Credits: 1
Track: Hot Topics
Level: Intermediate
Session Focus: 100% Clinical
Target Audience: Optimal Functioning

Elite military personnel require high level execution of cognitive, physical, and tactical skills in high pressure scenarios. The breathing habits and behaviors developed in response to various triggers or situations can facilitate or inhibit performance (Gilbert, 2005; Russo, Santarelli, and O’Rourke, 2017). Often the symptoms of dysfunctional breathing are dismissed as the effects of stress (Khazan, 2013). Assisting military personnel in developing 1) self-awareness of dysfunctional breathing habits and 2) the corresponding self-regulation techniques to optimize breathing chemistry affords warfighters the opportunity to achieve and sustain optimal performance in no fail mission scenarios. Capnography is a piece of biofeedback technology that allows consultants and clients to obtain objective data on breathing chemistry via partial end tidal carbon dioxide (PetCO2) readings (Meckley, 2013). In this workshop, multiple types of capnography will be presented on how to measure PetCO2 with optimal functioning clients in a mobile environment (i.e., treadmill, bike, etc.). Case studies will be presented on pilot use of capnography for assessing and improving breathing chemistry in mobile scenarios. At the conclusion of this workshop, attendees will be able to list symptoms and causes of acute and chronic overbreathing, describe how overbreathing can lead to poor cognitive and physical performance, assess and identify dysfunctional breathing behaviors during stationary baselines and during exercise. 

Learning Objectives:

·       List symptoms and causes of acute and chronic overbreathing
·       Describe how overbreathing can lead to poor cognitive and physical performance
·       Assess and identify dysfunctional breathing behaviors during stationary baselines and during exercise.

Speaker(s):

·       Christine Sanchez, PhD, C-MPC, BCB, Cognitive Performance Specialist/KBR: Dr. Christine Sanchez specializes in providing mental skills training for optimal performance in high pressure scenarios. She has over 13 years of experience working with athletes and other performers who desire to unlock their true potential. Dr. Sanchez routinely integrates biofeedback technology for facilitating optimal psycho-physiological regulation of performance states. Mental skills training programs consist of group workshops and individual consultations focusing on rapid skill acquisition, performance enhancement, and performance recovery. Over the years she has had the opportunity to consult with junior elite, collegiate, and professional athletes, as well as, first responders and military personnel.  Dr. Sanchez obtained her Ph.D. in Educational Psychology (Sport & Performance Psychology specialization) from Florida State University in 2010. She currently holds the following certifications: Certified - Mental Performance Consultant (C-MPC), Board Certified in Biofeedback (BCB), and Registered Yoga Teacher – 200hr (RYT-200).

·       Chad Fong, MS, Cognitive Performance Coach/F3EA: Chad’s passion for positive performance outcomes stems from his Division I collegiate swimming career. He earned his undergraduate degree in Psychology emphasizing in Social Psychology From Brigham Young University and then earned his Masters degree from the University of Utah in Psycho-social Aspects of Sport. During graduate school Chad coached and consulted with the University of Utah Swim Team and local Ski Teams.  His research focused on choking under pressure and how to best utilize mental skills to prevent under-performing. Since graduation Chad has worked as a Master Resilience Trainer, Performance Expert for the United States Army and currently works for the United States Army Special Operations Command at Fort Bragg as their Cognitive Performance Coach.

 

BOS23 Integrating the PERMA Model with Biofeedback and Neurofeedback For Optimal Performance Training
Time: 8am-9am
CE Credits: 1
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Intermediate
Session Focus: 100% Clinical
Target Audience: This presentation is appropriate for clinicians, researchers, and educators who utilize biofeedback and/or neurofeedback with athletes for the purpose of optimal performance.

Biofeedback and neurofeedback modalities are powerful tools for improving self regulation and optimal performance, but it is important to connect the measurable changes generated during the training process with the overall well-being of the client.  Biofeedback and neurofeedback training can be used In conjunction with Martin Seligman’s PERMA model to assess an athlete’s well-being and train them to improve in all 5 areas. This model, in turn, provides a framework within which to communicate ongoing progress with the client.  Dr. Seligman, often called the “Father of Positive Psychology,” breaks well-being down into Positive emotion, Engagement, Relationships, Meaning, and Accomplishment (PERMA).  This presentation is designed to discuss each of these 5 components as they relate to optimal performance, define a practical method for assessing an athlete’s ability to create each component, and explore ways in which each component of PERMA can be integrated with biofeedback and neurofeedback both from an assessment perspective and from a training perspective.  Modalities of biofeedback which will be discussed include Heart Rate Variability (HRV), Respiration, and NEUROFEEDBACK.

Learning Objectives:

·       List the 5 components of PERMA
·       Connect each component of PERMA with the goals of biofeedback training
·       Assess a client’s current ability to create well-being as defined by the PERMA model
·       Communicate progress toward training goals in biofeedback training and it’s generalization to each component of PERMA

Speaker(s):

·       D. Allen Novian, PhD, LMFT, LPC-S, BCN, Clinical Director of integrative Counseling & Neurofeedback Solutions: Allen Novian has been working in the neurofeedback and biofeedback fields since 2001.  Dr. Novian was blessed with the opportunity to use his biofeedback and counseling skills in both a therapeutic setting as well as at the VA hospital, where he was the program coordinator for the Stress Buster’s Program until 2009.  That program is now run by WellMed.  Dr. Novian has been in private practice since 2007 and has made neurofeedback and biofeedback his specialty. He has provided more than 25,000 neurofeedback and biofeedback sessions in addition to counseling individuals, couples and families, with clients ranging from 3 to 94, and diagnoses including but not limited to anxiety, depression, ADD/ADHD, bipolar, seizure disorder, ASD, and benzodiazepine withdrawal.  In 2016 he became  an adjunt professor in the St. Mary’s University Graduate Counseling program, where he has taught Theory and Practice of Neurofeedback, Seminar in Counseling: Advanced topics in Neurofeedback, and Neurofeedback Practicum.  Dr. Novian holds a PhD in Marriage and Family Therapy, and is both a Licensed Professional Counselor Supervisor and a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist.  He is board certified in Neurofeedback (BCN) by the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance.  Dr. Novian is active in the Biofeedback Society of Texas, where he has been a board member for the last 3 years, and in the International Society for Neurofeedback and Research where he has been responsible for curating the Comprehensive Bibliography of Neurofeedback Research.

·       Omar Husain, MA, LCDC, LPC-Intern, Intern/ integrative Counseling & Neurofeedback Solutions: Omar Husain is a doctoral student in counselor education and supervision at the University of Texas at San Antonio. He is an LPC-Intern and a licensed chemical dependency counselor. His research interests include peak performance in biofeedback and neurofeedback, substance abuse and process addictions, and issues related to American Muslims.

 

KEY04 Biofeedback, Positive Psychology, and Health Behavior Change for Happiness and Optimal Performance
Time: 9:15am-10:30am
CE Credits: 1
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Intermediate
Session Focus: 100% Clinical
Target Audience: Individuals interested in the applications of biofeedback, mindfulness, health habits and motivational interviewing.

Happiness, positive mood states and high performance can be reached with Biofeedback assisted cognitive and physiological interventions. Given the current research on happiness, one can achieve positive mood states by practicing habits to improve physiological and psychological states. While Biofeedback allows the assessment of cognitive and physiological outcomes, positive psychology tools offer cognitive strategies that lead to wellbeing. Furthermore, poor health habits can lead to depression and decreased performance, and teaching clients to manage stress, nutrition, exercise and sleep will make it possible to experience positive mood states. In this presentation, I discuss three aspects to helping individuals thrive and improve well-being. Specifically, I will review the use of Biofeedback to measure levels of stress, and how utilizing biofeedback and stress mediating techniques can give one the perceived control to regulate both body and mind. Next, I discuss the application of mindfulness and positive psychology techniques and the adaptation of these principles for wellbeing. Finally, I review evidence of exercise, nutrition, laughter, and sleep to optimize performance. Motivational Interviewing will be used to introduce and sustain the aforementioned habits and the integration of Biofeedback therapies.

Learning Objectives:

·       To integrate Biofeedback therapies for general stress management and for health promotion and chronic medical conditions
·       To implement positive psychology techniques and mindfulness with biofeedback to facilitate optimal mood and health
·       To gain skills in health interventions like diet, exercise, sleep and nutrition to assist biofeedback therapies in achieving health and wellbeing
·       To learn tools in motivational interviewing to help clients to assess and sustain change

Speaker(s):

·       Lamees Khorshid, PsyD, BCB, BCN, Clinical Health Psychologist, Peak2Happy, Inc: Dr. Khorshid is an international Speaker and Coach, and has given presentations to fortune 500 companies, top hospitals, and various organizations.  She speaks on happiness, peak performance, health, stress management, and relationships. She is also the author of the best selling book, I Want to Be Happy. Dr. Khorshid holds a doctorate in both Clinical and Health Psychology, a Bachelor’s degree in Corporate Communications, and board certifications in Biofeedback, Neurofeedback, and Medical Hypnosis. She completed her Health Psychology postdoctoral residency at the Cleveland Clinic, a world leader in medical excellence.

 

Networking Break / EXHIBITOR DRAWING
Time: 10:30 am-11:00am

 

ORAL2 Oral Presentations - Session 2
Time: 11am-12:30pm
CE Credits: 1.5
Track:
Level:
Session Focus:
Target Audience:

 

BOS24 The Efficacy of Casual Video Games in Reducing Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety: Implications for Biofeedback Practitioners
Time: 11am-12:30pm
CE Credits: 1.5
Track: Hot Topics
Level: Intermediate
Session Focus: 20% Clinical/80% Research
Target Audience: This presentation is appropriate for biofeedback students, individuals interested in treatment alternatives for mood conditions, practitioners and researchers.

Researchers using electroencephalogram (EEG) have found a relationship between frontal alpha asymmetry and depression though results have been conflicting (Davidson &Henriques, 2000; Gotlib, 1998; Davidson, 1995). There is limited research on how casual videogames (CVG) affect alpha activity in individuals with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and other mood disorders. These following presentations will involve three clinical studies using HRV, EEG, psychological and somatic changes to determine the efficacy of video game play in reducing symptoms of depression and anxiety. In studies conducted using EEG, researchers have found a relationship between alpha activity and depression. When alpha activity improves so does depression symptoms (Davidson, 1995). There is limited research on how biofeedback integrated causal videogames (CVG) affect alpha production for individuals who are clinically depressed. The purpose of this randomized controlled study was to determine whether a regimen of prescribed CVGs improved alpha production and correlate these changes with depression symptoms. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss a three part, multi-phased study that tested the influence of a regimen of prescribed CVG play on an individual’s alpha activity and mood, anxiety and depressive symptoms. All three phases of the study including methodology and results will be discussed in this presentation.

Learning Objectives:

·       Observe CVG affect on alpha brain waves through demonstration of research protocol
·       Summarize applications of readily available CVGs on various populations
·       Apply potential applications of CVG use in other relevant populations.

Speaker(s):

·       Christina Brown-Bochicchio, PhD(c), CTRS, East Carolina University: Dr. Russoniello is the primary presenter. His contributions to psychophysiology have spanned decades. Following his service as a Marine Corps machine gunner and decorated Vietnam combat veteran. He has since focused on the using biofeedback and gaming as an alternative to medicine for people with stress-related medical disorders, including veterans and victims of Hurricane Floyd. He spends most of his time as professor in the Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies in the College of Health and Human Performance and director of ECU’s Center for Applied Psychophysiology

·       Christina Brown-Bochicchio, PhD(c), East Carolina University: Christina Brown-Bochicchio, CTRS/LRT- Instructor earned her bachelor's degree in Parks and Recreation Management with an emphasis in event planning from Northern Arizona University and a master's degree in Recreational Therapy Administration as well as a graduate certificate in Biofeedback from East Carolina University. Christina is currently a candidate in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration at East Carolina University. Prior to pursuing a career in academics, Christina was a qualified intellectual disabilities professional and recreational therapist with Angel View Inc., in Desert Hot Springs, California. Christina has worked professionally with several populations including older adults in community settings and with individuals with developmental disabilities.

·       Amelia Saul, MS, CTRS, East Carolina University: Amelia is a PhD student in Rehabilitation Counseling and a CTRS.

·       Lauren Bethune Scroggs, MS, NCC, CCMHC, LCAS-A, LPC-A, East Carolina University: Lauren is a PhD candidate in Rehabilitation Counseling and an experienced counselor.

 

BOS25 2020 Vision of EEG, Dipole and Independent Component Analysis
Time: 11am-12:30pm
CE Credits: 1.5
Track: Basic Science
Level: Intermediate
Session Focus: 40% Clinical/80% Research
Target Audience: Neurofeedback practitioners who are interested in ICA but are unsure of the validity of using ICA within a clinical environment. Neurofeedback practitioners and scientists who are interested in the relationship between brain physiology and ICA.

There has been an attempt in EEG research to establish physiological validity of independent component analysis (ICA) (Bell & Sejnowski, 1995) as applied to scalp-recorded EEG (Onton and Makeig, 2006;  Delorme et al., 2012). In the first presentation, Makoto Miyakoshi will review qualitative explanations of this claim, by re-visiting the concept of equivalent current dipole and showing how ‘dipolarity’ has been used to justify the physiological validity of ICA results. We will introduce the concept of four cortical mesosource types, namely Type I though IV (localized or distributed and temporal-stationary or non-stationary), (Nunez and Srinivasan, 2006). We will then confirm that the ‘effective cortical source model’ derived by ICA applied to the Type I source is ‘localized and temporally stationary’. Thus, we determine what type of cortical dynamics ICA can identify most efficiently. In the next presentation, Michael Villanueva will review brain diseases and disorders more commonly encountered by neurofeedback practitioners in their daily practice. These diseases and disorders will be characterized based on degree of their localization and temporal stationarity, which may predict usefulness in using ICA in evaluating and treating each disease and disorder. Finally, analogue models of these diseases and disorders in animal studies will be reviewed to provide support for the characterizations with electrophysiological evidence.

Learning Objectives:

·       Summarize what a dipole is.
·       List two brain disorders in which ICA may be reasonably used.
·       List two reasons for claiming physiological validity in ICA-decomposed EEG.

Speaker(s):

·       Michael Villanueva, PhD, Alpha Theta Center: Dr. Michael Villanueva is a Clinical Psychologist.  In 2011, he volunteered for deployment to Afghanistan as a US Army Combat Psychologist and used Neurofeedback within a combat environment. After deployment, he created a neurofeedback and research company. When one of his heroin-addicted clients entered an Ibogaine clinic in Mexico, he obtained a pre qEEG and a post treatment qEEG. Driven to understand the inexplicable changes in the EEG, he studied digital signal processing, abandoning vendor-driven commercial EEG software, engaging in collaborative, bridge-building relationships with EEG project scientists. For the past 4 years, he has clinically integrated EEG digital signaling processing methods and tools, many of which were developed by the Swartz Center for Computational Neuroscience, thus transforming the Alpha Theta Center into an advanced neurofeedback, research, and training center.

·       Makoto Miyakoshi, PhD, Project Scientist, Swartz Center for Computational Neuroscience, Institute for Neural Computation University of San Diego: Makoto Miyakoshi received his PhD in the field of experimental psychology from Nagoya University in 2011. He is currently working as a project scientist at Swartz Center for Computational Neuroscience, Institute for Neural Computation, University of California San Diego. His research interests include development and application of signal processing, statistical analyses, and data visualization for human EEG and ECoG data. He also works as a consultant and analyst as an EEG analysis expert often with psychiatrists, neurologists, and radiologists using open source as well as in-house developed tools. He is also an associate developer of EEGLAB, which is a free open-source software library which is most widely used according to Hanke and Halchenko (2011). He has authored and co-authored more than 30 academic publications that include technical papers about MRI and EEG signal processing, higher-order visual and auditory recognition, and clinical psychological and neurological studies.

 

BOS26 Crappy Cases: Should I Zig, Zag, or Drive Off the Cliff?
Time: 11am-12:30pm
CE Credits: 1.5
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Introductory
Session Focus: 70% Clinical/30% Research
Target Audience: This workshop is primarily focused on newer practitioners, but will prove useful for anyone who has experienced a treatment failure, regardless of experience.

When learning new skills, we are often told, “Making mistakes is essential to learning.”However, when it comes down to it, most case presentations, conferences, papers, and books describe successful cases, either illustrating prototypical responses to designated protocols, or highlighting the skills of the practitioner in pulling off a last-minute success. If it is true that “failures” provide the best opportunity to learn, it makes sense to carefully examine cases that do not go well. In that spirit, we propose a symposium focusing on treatment failures and what we can learn from them. Experienced clinicians will present bio- and neurofeedback cases that went wrong. Each will discuss why they think it went badly, how they managed, and what they and the audience can learn from it. This symposium has two primary goals. First, to acknowledge that change is complex and not always predictable, even with “objective” data. Applied psychophysiology reinforces the belief that there is a strong causal relation between objectively-collected data and change. This is clearly inaccurate, primarily because change is much more complex than even our most sophisticated abilities to collect data and provide feedback. It is useful to investigate cases in which treatment is done well but outcomes are still poor. The second goal of this symposium is for experienced practitioners to model a constructive response to treatment failure, including self care. We focus on what we, as therapists, can do to take care of ourselves when we make a mistake or when treatment is simply not working despite our best efforts. Audience members, regardless of their skill level, will benefit from experienced and admired members of our community discussing their own response to treatment failures. How we, as professionals, respond to problematic outcomes has vital implications for the effectiveness and longevity of our field.

Learning Objectives:

·       Recognize the practitioner, client, and treatment factors that contribute to poor treatment outcome.
·       Explain the importance of looking beyond the data to treat the patient.
·       Discuss the use of self compassion by the practitioner to cope with poor treatment outcomes, and reduce burnout and empathy fatigue.

Speaker(s):

·       Saul Rosenthal, Phd, BCB, BCB+HRV, BCN, Licensed Psychologist: Saul Rosenthal, PhD, BFB, BCN, BCB-HRV is a developmental and clinical psychologist in the Boston area. Over the past twenty years he has built expertise in integrating approaches to health, primarily drawing from Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Mindfulness, Motivational Interviewing, Biofeedback and Neurofeedback. He works with patients across the lifespan to help them manage persistent health issues. Dr. Rosenthal has also worked in a variety of medical and community health educational settings, including serving as Training Director and Biofeedback Coordinator of Behavioral Medicine at the Cambridge Health Alliance, Harvard Medical School. He also oversaw the biofeedback and training programs in the Primary Care Behavioral Health service at the Edith Nourse Rogers Veterans Medical Center. In addition to his clinical work, Dr. Rosenthal presents to a wide variety of audiences on topics related to biofeedback and applied psychophysiology. He is also involved in training, supervision and biofeedback mentoring.

·       Inna Khazan, PhD, BCB, BCB-HRV, Clinical psychologist; Harvard Medical School/Boston Center for Health Psychology and Biofeedback: Inna Khazan, PhD, BCB is a faculty member at Harvard Medical School and a clinical psychologist specializing in health psychology and performance excellence training using biofeedback and mindfulness-based approaches. Dr. Khazan is recognized as a pioneer in the area of mindfulness-based biofeedback. She teaches nationally and internationally, including at institutions such as the US Navy Special Warfare, US Army Special Forces, and the Stuttgart Opera and Ballet Company. Dr. Khazan is a member of the board of directors for the Institute for Meditation and Psychotherapy (IMP), Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback (AAPB), and Biofeedback Certification International Alliance (BCIA), where she is currently chair elect. Dr. Khazan is the author of numerous journal articles and 2 books: Clinical Handbook of Biofeedback: A Step-by-Step Guide to Training and Practice with Mindfulness and Biofeedback and Mindfulness in Everyday Life: practical solutions for improving your health and performance.

·       Ethan Benore, Phd, BCB, ABPP, Cleveland Clinic, Childrens Hospital for Rehabilitation: Dr. Benore received his PhD in Clinical Psychology from Bowling Green State University, with a focus on Child Psychology and Behavioral Medicine. He completed a residency at the Kennedy Krieger Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and a fellowship at the Cleveland Clinic. He is the current Head of the Center for Pediatric Behavioral Health at the Cleveland Clinic. Dr. Benore’s clinical and research focus is on pain and sleep in children—predominately focusing on how biobehavioral factors influence pain perception and daily functioning. He is board certified in Child and Adolescent Psychology by the American Board of Professional Psychology. He is also board certified in biofeedback and is the current President of the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback.

·       Angelika Y. Sadar, M.A. Licensed Psychologist, BCN, Sadar Psychological and Sports Center: Angelika Sadar is a licensed psychologist who is board certified in Neurofeedback and Heart Rate Variability. She has been in private practice in the greater Philadelphia area since 1985. She is a treatment coordinator at Sadar Psychological and a nationally recognized speaker providing education and offering training to other professionals in neurofeedback, biofeedback, and hypnosis. She is the Executive Director of the Northeast Region Biofeedback Society and is on the board of the Association of Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback.  

 

BOS27 Presidential Symposium on the Clinical Efficacy of Biofeedback and Neurofeedback
Time: 11am-12:30pm
CE Credits: 1.5
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Introductory
Session Focus: 50% Clinical/50% Research
Target Audience: 

 

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