Wednesday Schedule

 

Wednesday, April 1, 2020

Time: 7:00am-7:00pm
Registration

 

Time: 7:00am-8:00am
Workshop Attendee-only CONTINENTAL Breakfast

 

WS01 BCIA Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback Certificate of Completion Workshop - Part 1
Time: 8:00am-5:30pm
CE Credits: 7.5
Track: Basic Science
Level: Introductory
Session Focus: 50% Clinical/50% Research
Target Audience: Biofeedback/neurofeedback practitioners, psychologists, clinical counselors, clinical social workers, marriage and family therapists, nurses, physicians, and other healthcare professionals and academicians interested in utilizing heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback in their practice or research.

This workshop is designed for biofeedback/neurofeedback practitioners, psychologists, clinical counselors, clinical social workers, marriage and family therapists, nurses, physicians, and other healthcare professionals and academicians interested in utilizing heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback in their practice or research. This workshop will cover 7.5 hours of the BCIA HRV Biofeedback Certificate of Completion Blueprint and will cover cardiac anatomy and physiology, respiratory anatomy and physiology, autonomic nervous system anatomy and physiology, heart rate variability, HRV instrumentation, and HRV measurements. Attendees will review the cardiac, respiratory, and autonomic anatomy and physiology that underlies HRV biofeedback. They will discuss the central role of breathing in diverse disorders like anxiety, hypertension, and chronic pain. Last, they will explain how HRV biofeedback restores autonomic balance and why this is important to health and performance. Attendees will be able to discuss the meaning and sources of HRV, and the correlates of low, normal, and high HRV. The presenters will explain the relationship between aging, disease, and reduced HRV. Attendees will be able explain how to properly use HRV instruments and interpret signals from blood volume pulse, electrocardiogram, and respirometer sensors. The presenters will survey the major artifacts that contaminate recordings from these sensors and show how to prevent or minimize them. Attendees will be able to describe and interpret HRV time and frequency domain measurements.

Learning Objectives:

·       learn how to explain the meaning of HRV, sources of HRV, factors that influence HRV, correlates of low and normal HRV, and the benefits of increased HRV.
·       learn how to explain the physiological basis of HRV and the blood volume pulse (BVP), electrocardiogram (ECG), and respirometer signals.
·       learn how BVP, ECG, and breathing sensors operate, how to perform tracking tests, and how to identify and control artifacts.
·       learn BVP and ECG sensor placements with regard to cultural sensitivity.
·       learn how to explain HRV time-domain and frequency-domain measurements.

Speaker(s):

·       Fredric Shaffer, PhD, BCB, Professor of Psychology, Truman State University: Fredric Shaffer, PhD, BCB is a biological psychologist and professor of Psychology and former Department Chair at Truman State University, where he has taught since 1975 and has served as Director of Truman’s Center for Applied Psychophysiology since 1977. In 2008, he received the Walker and Doris Allen Fellowship for Faculty Excellence. In 2013, he received the Truman State University Outstanding Research Mentor of the Year award. Dr. Shaffer was the principal co-editor of Evidence-Based Practice in Biofeedback and Neurofeedback (3rd ed.) and authored 12 of its chapters. He was a co-editor with Donald Moss of Foundations of Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback: A Book of Readings. He co-authored with Mark S. Schwartz a chapter on entering the field and assuring competence in Biofeedback: A Practitioner's Guide (4th ed.). He co-authored with Donald Moss, a chapter on biofeedback in the Textbook of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (2nd ed.). He co-authored with Rollin McCraty and Christopher Zerr, the Frontiers in Psychology review article "A healthy heart is not a metronome: An integrative review of the heart's anatomy and heart rate variability." He is a contributing editor for the journal Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback. He is a BCIA-accredited educator for Biofeedback, HRV Biofeedback, Human Physiology, Physiological Psychology, and Psychopharmacology. His current research focuses on techniques to increase heart rate variability. Dr. Shaffer is a BCIA Senior Diplomate in Biofeedback. Dr. Shaffer is the Chair of the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance (BCIA), director of its Biofeedback and HRV Biofeedback Task Forces, and member of its Neurofeedback Task Force, and Treasurer for the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback (AAPB).

·       Donald Moss, PhD, BCB, BCN, Saybrook University: Donald Moss, PhD, BCB, is Dean, College of Integrative Medicine and Health Sciences, at Saybrook University, Oakland, CA. There he has built training programs in biofeedback, clinical hypnosis, integrative mental health, wellness coaching, and integrative/functional nutrition. Dr. Moss is the Education Chair of the Society for Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis (SCEH). He is also the ethics chair and international certification chair for the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance. He has served as president of Division 30 (hypnosis) of the American Psychological Association, SCEH, and the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback (AAPB).

·       Inna Khazan, PhD, BCB, Harvard Medical School: Inna Khazan, PhD, BCB is a faculty member at Harvard Medical School and a clinical psychologist specializing in health psychology and performance excellence training using biofeedback and mindfulness-based approaches. Dr. Khazan is recognized as a pioneer in the area of mindfulness-based biofeedback. She teaches nationally and internationally, including at institutions such as the US Navy Special Warfare, US Army Special Forces, and the Stuttgart Opera and Ballet Company. Dr. Khazan is a member of the board of directors for the Institute for Meditation and Psychotherapy (IMP), Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback (AAPB), and Biofeedback Certification International Alliance (BCIA), where she is currently chair elect. Dr. Khazan is the author of numerous journal articles and 2 books: Clinical Handbook of Biofeedback: A Step-by-Step Guide to Training and Practice with Mindfulness and Biofeedback and Mindfulness in Everyday Life: practical solutions for improving your health and performance.

 

WS02 Neurofield Advanced Course - Part 1
Time: 8:00am-5:00pm
CE Credits: 7
Track
Level: Advanced
Session Focus:
Target Audience: Advanced Practitioners familiar with the Neurofield system.

The NeuroField Neuromodulation Advanced Training is designed to enhance your skills in EEG and QEEG assessment, analysis, map interpretation, neuromodulation and treatment planning in the NeuroField64 software platform, as well as Independent Components Analysis via EEGlab and WinEEG. Case studies are welcome. This training is for intermediate to advanced neurotherapy clinicians.

NeuroField64 combines Pulsed Electro Magnetic Field stimulation (pEMF), transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS), and transcranial random noise stimulation stimulation (tRNS), and transcranial Advanced Pink Noise Stimulation (tAPNS) modalities with both Z-score and Amplitude EEG neurofeedback for the purpose of enhancing treatment effectiveness.

Dr. Dogris and Dr. Thompson will lecture regarding the application of NeuroField64 on various clinical diagnoses including (but not limited to) Autism, ADHD, Mood Disorders, Substance Abuse, Sleep Issues, TBI, and Concussion, as well as Peak Performance. Dr. Dogris and Dr. Thompson will conduct live demonstrations of NeuroField64 and provide participants the opportunity to experience these modalities during the training.

Learning Objectives:

·       Attendees should be able to identify different pathologies associated with EEG and QEEG presentations.
·       Attendees should be able to administer neuromodulation protocols, such as pEMF, tACS, tDCS, tRNS, and Pink Noise Stimulation
·       Attendees should be able to use the neurofield system, including the synchronized application of stimulation and NEUROFEEDBACK.
·       Attendees should be able to list the mechanism of action for neurostimulation procedures.

Speaker(s):

·       Nicholas Dogris, PhD, QEEG-D, BCN, NeuroField: Dr. Nicholas Dogris is a psychologist who has been working in the EEG field for over 25 years.  He is a licensed psychologist who runs a clinic in Santa Barbara and Bishop California.  He is board certified in neurofeedback and also holds a QEEG-D certification.  Dr. Dogris was originally trained in neurofeedback by Margaret Ayers in the 1990’s and would go on to learn many different EEG platforms over the years.  In 2007 he co-founded NeuroField, Inc with Brad Wiitala and developed the first EEG synchronized pEMF stimulation that utilized z-score data analysis and real time feedback. Dr. Dogris and Brad Wiitala went on to develop many other innovations over that past 12 years including synchronized tDCS/tACS/tRNS/tAPNS/pEMF in the new NeuroFiedl64 software platform.

·       Tiff Thompson, PhD, R.EEG.T, BCN, QEEG-D, MFT, NeuroField: Tiff is a board certified neurotherapist, licensed psychotherapist, and Quantitative EEG Diplomate who owns and runs a neurotherapy clinic in Santa Barbara. She is a Registered EEG Technician, a medical credential bestowed by the American Society of Neurodiagnostic Technicians; she has worked in neurology clinics, as well as clinical settings, and has taught in kindergarten to university settings. Tiff has served as the Executive Director of the Western Association of Biofeedback and Neuroscience. She holds two Masters degrees, one in Depth Counseling Psychology and another in Rhetoric. She has a PhD in Psychology; her dissertation was on the intersection of psychodynamic psychology model of the psyche and electroencephalography (EEG).

She teaches neuromodulation and neurofeedback courses nationally and internationally for NeuroField, Inc. with her husband, Nicholas Dogris. She also organizes and hosts an annual conference for Neurofield in Santa Barbara for NeuroField users. She is in the process of finalizing an online educational platform: The School of Neurotherapy, which will run three separate curricula: QEEG Didactic training, BCIA Didactic training, and NeuroField Education. Tiff regularly delivers public and trade organization lectures on Quantitative EEGs, the psychodynamics of EEG, neurotherapy, and induced meditative states at various organizations.

 

WS03 Foundational Breathing Training Beyond Biofeedback
Time: 8:00am-5:00pm
CE Credits: 7
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Introductory
Session Focus: 100% Clinical
Target Audience: Anyone who teaches respiration or HRV biofeedback or has an interest in breathing and posture.

Functional breathing involves more than paced breathing. Decompensated physical posture can compromise the musculoskeletal system, creating major obstacles to functional breathing. While biofeedback sensors can generate awareness about breathing rate, rhythm and fluidity as well as muscle tension, it fails to provide information about proper alignment in seated or standing positions, nor suggests exercises to strengthening weakened muscles that influence breathing.    During this day-long workshop, the anatomy and physiology of respiration will be briefly reviewed, and location and function of accessory muscles will be addressed. Attendees will learn how to visually assess respiration in seated and standing posture through inspection as well as basic palpation skills. Simple postural adjustments will be introduced to help clients immediately experience changes in effortlessness of breathing. Seated and standing corrective therapeutic exercises will be demonstrated and practiced during this session to help cultivate postural alignment, and instructional handouts will be provided.    Finally, since many clients and athletes are using a wide array of breathing practices, a review of common breathing exercises will be examined, including pranayama techniques, chanting, Wim Hof breathing, Holotropic breathing, and Buteyko.

Learning Objectives:

·       Review anatomy of respiration
·       Learn how to visual assess breathing Learn how to manually assess breathing through palpation
·       Teach clients subtle postural adjustments to create effortless breathing
·       Practice corrective therapeutic exercises to help cultivate postural alignment
·       Recognize various breathing techniques commonly used by patients

Speaker(s):

·       Brad Lichtenstein, ND, BCB-HRV, Associate and Clinic Professor / Bastyr University: As a licensed naturopathic physician in private practice and an associate and clinical professor at Bastyr University, Dr. Lichtenstein has helped people embody the lives they want to live. His approach integrates naturopathic medicine, mind-body medicine and biofeedback, depth & somatic psychology, Eastern contemplative practices, yoga and movement, and end-of-life care. He serves as an Attending Physician for the Mind-Body Medicine and Chronic Pain Clinics at the Bastyr Center for Natural Health where he established their ongoing mind-body medicine and biofeedback shifts with a strong clinical and teaching focus on developing psycho-emotional-spiritual health while dealing with chronic, life-challenging illnesses. His approach to care was profoundly shaped by his participation in a joint research study between the University of Washington and Bastyr University where he provided over 500 guided meditations to hospice patients.    Dr. Lichtenstein has written many publications, including articles in STEP Perspective, Caregiver Quarterly, Naturopathic Doctors News and Review (NDNR), and the Huffington Post, and he has contributed a chapter on Mind-Body Medicine for the Textbook of Naturopathic Medicine, as well as a chapter on Mind-Body Medicine and Men’s Health in Integrative Men’s Health. He continues to present nationally on a wide array of topics including mindfulness and meditation as a healing modality, determining the appropriate mind-body technique for healing, and the use of breathwork, HRV and biofeedback to increase resiliency. He hosts monthly Death Cafes around the greater Seattle area, and has lead countless Advanced Directives parties, encouraging people to become more comfortable with the inevitable reality that faces us all, and to discuss preparation for the future, should one no longer be able to make decisions for oneself.

 

WS04 Rapid ClinicalQ Assessment and Braindriving
Time: 8:00am-5:00pm
CE Credits: 7
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Introductory
Session Focus: 80% Clinical/20% Research
Target Audience: Licensed health care professionals wishing to add neurotherapy to their practices.

Neurotherapy is rapidly evolving into a primary care option for many disorders.  Problems with mood, anxiety, sleep quality, learning, cognitive processing, pain, addictions, anger management, and age-related memory are all amenable to rapid assessment and treatment.  The assessment procedures are simple and straight forward involving assessment of a limited number of brain sites.  Treatment options other than neurofeedback have been developed to markedly accelerate neurotherapy.  Primary among these treatment options is the braindriving procedure. These complementary techniques markedly facilitate neurotherapy as a viable primary care alternative to dangerous and often ineffective pharmaceuticals.

Learning Objectives:

·       Learn rapid diagnostic procedures
·       Interpret QEEG data
·       Identify common QEEG signatures for disorders
·       Recognize EEG patterns for trauma
·       Identify simple disorders for rapid treatment

Speaker(s):

·       Paul G. Swingle, PhD, FCPA, RPsych, Swingle Clinic: Paul G. Swingle, Ph.D. R.Psych. was Professor of Psychology at the University of Ottawa prior to moving to Vancouver where he is now Director of the Swingle Clinic. A Fellow of the Canadian Psychological Association, Dr. Swingle was Lecturer in Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and during the same time period was Associate Attending Psychologist at McLean Hospital (Boston) where he also was Coordinator of the Clinical Psychophysiology Service. He is a Registered Psychologist in British Columbia, certified in Biofeedback and Neurotherapy. He has several recent books: Biofeedback for the Brain (2010, Rutgers University Press); Adding Neurotherapy to Your Practice (2015, Springer); When the ADHD Diagnosis is Wrong (2015, Praeger). The Management of Power (Reissued, Routledge, 2018).

 

WS05 Understanding and Treating Chronic Pain
Time: 8:00am-5:00pm
CE Credits: 7
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Introductory
Session Focus: 80% Clinical/20% Research
Target Audience: Practitioners who want to learn more about treating pain from a biopsychsocial perspective.

Chronic pain significantly impacts millions of people around the world and across the lifespan, negatively affecting productivity, health, interpersonal relationships and quality of life. At the same time disability and health care costs are astronomical (estimates range from $560-$635 billion per year in the United States).     According to the NIH, between 11% and 40% of adults in the United States experience chronic pain, making it one of the most common health issues. For example, one out of every six Americans (over 55 million people) experience migraines or a severe headache disorder. It is safe to posit that chronic pain has or will impact all of our lives or the lives of people we know. Chronic pain results from complex interactions among biological, psychosocial, family, and socio-cultural factors. For all intents and purposes, each individual’s pain experience is unique. Therefore, it is imperative to tailor treatment in the context of a preventative, multidisciplinary, culturally sensitive, and supportive framework. Unfortunately, this is not typically the case. Westernized medicine tends to focus on biomedical intervention, an approach that is, at best, moderately successful. In fact, our reliance on biomedical approaches leads to additional problems, such as the opioid epidemic, over-use of invasive or pharmacological intervention, and the dismissal of potentially safer and effective non-biomedical interventions. In this workshop, we present a biopsychosocial model of chronic pain treatment, emphasizing psychophysiological approaches. We discuss pragmatics of treating chronic pain including formulation, planning, patient buy-in, intervention, adherence, and discharge. This approach is necessarily integrative, multiculturally sensitive, collaborative, and personalized. We incorporate the latest understanding of complex pain that focuses on the patient’s ability to modulate and change their pain experience. Case material drawn from diverse settings illustrates each aspect of treatment, including specific interventions, what to expect, and troubleshooting.

Learning Objectives:

·       Summarize a functional, biopsychosocial model of chronic pain
·       Utilize bio- and neurofeedback training to mitigate chronic pain
·       Engage with patients in a collaborative approach to treatment
·       Recognize their role in a multidisciplinary approach to treating chronic pain

Speaker(s):

·       Saul Rosenthal, PhD, BCB, BCB-HRV, BCN, Licensed Psychologist: Saul Rosenthal is a developmental and clinical psychologist in the Boston area. Over the past twenty years he has built expertise in integrating approaches to health, primarily drawing from Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Mindfulness, Motivational Interviewing, Biofeedback, and Neurofeedback. He works with patients across the lifespan, helping them manage health and stress related issues. He is particularly interested in the complex biopsychosocial factors involved in conditions like chronic pain.    Dr. Rosenthal has worked in a variety of health care settings, including serving as Training Director and Biofeedback Coordinator of Behavioral Medicine at the Cambridge Health Alliance. He also oversaw the biofeedback program at the Edith Nourse Rogers Veterans Medical Center in the Primary Care Behavioral Health service. In addition to his clinical work, Dr. Rosenthal presents to a wide variety of audiences on topics related to biofeedback and applied psychophysiology. He is also involved in training, supervision and biofeedback mentoring.

·       Katie Fleishman, PhD, LP, Boston Children's Hospital: Katie Fleischman, Ph.D is a pediatric psychologist at the Boston’s Children’s Hospital’s Department of Neurology Headache Program/Brain Injury Program and an Instructor at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Fleischman specializes in research, assessment, and treatment of children and adolescents with acute and chronic medical conditions, with a particular focus on pain. Currently, she is conducting research, teaching and providing consultation, psychotherapy, and biofeedback to youth with migraines, headaches, vestibular and post concussive syndromes.  Dr. Fleischman has published and presented on various topics of pediatric illness, pain, headaches and associative symptoms at numerous institutions and conferences.

 

WS06 Biofeedback and Neurofeedback Interventions for Stress, Anxiety and Depression
Time: 8:00am-5:00pm
CE Credits: 7
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Intermediate
Session Focus: 90% Clinical/10% Research
Target Audience: Psychologists, psychiatrists, mental health counselors, social workers, sport psychologists and other professionals who work in clinical settings addressing, stress, anxiety and depression

Biofeedback and Neurofeedback Interventions for Stress, Anxiety and Depression

Learning Objectives:

·       Participants will be able to identify several appropriate psychophysiological interventions that can be used stress, anxiety and depression
·       Participants will be able to demonstrate appropriate application of specific psychophysiological modalities in stress, anxiety and depression interventions
·       Participants will be able to provide at least three examples of how psychophysiological interventions can be integrated in stress, anxiety and depression remediation
·       Participants will be able to list the some of the core elements of stress, anxiety and depression and how they relate to their intervention
·       Participants will be able to identify at least five psychophysiological characteristics as they relate to stress, anxiety and depression

Speaker(s):

·       Santiago Brand, BA, ESP, BSP, BCN,BCB, HRV, Brand Neurofeedback: Santiago is a licensed psychologist in Colombia with a private practice. He has been using neurofeedback and biofeedback for the past 10 years and has worked in sport and clinical psychology for the past 15 years. He is a consultant for the Colombian Olympic Committee and Guatemalan Olympic Committee. Santiago is also a University professor in the areas of neurofeedback, biofeedback and neuroscience. Santiago is trained in biofeedback neurofeedback and qEEG and is BCIA board certified en both biofeedback and neurofeedback. Santiago also has a strong interest in trauma interventions and since 2016 has been trained in Brainspotting which he uses to treat trauma victims of the armed conflict in Colombia. Santiago has also done research in the field of trauma, psychophysiology and the EEG and is has authored a chapter on trauma and the EEG in the 2018 book” The Power of Brainspotting: An international Anthology. He is also a neurofeedback consultant and trainer having delivered workshops in several countries in both English and Spanish.

·       David Arroyo, Psy.D, Npf, BCB, Mindful Neuroscience Center; Hospital StarMedica Qro; Universidad del Valle de México: David Arroyo is a clinical specialist and professor with extensive experience in the fields of Clinical, Medical and Health Psychology and Applied Psychophysiology. Founding member of the Mexican Bio and Neurofeedback Society and part of its board of directors for 10 years. For 9 years he was in charge of the Medical Psychology Service of the StarMedica Hospital in Mexico City, where he established the first in-hospital applied psychophysiology service of its kind in his country, integrating it to the management of different psychological and medical disorders in an interdisciplinary manner, in addition to being appointed president of the Medical Bioethics Committee for two consecutive periods; positions he continues to hold at StarMedica Hospital now in the city of Querétaro. He´s also co-founder and CEO of the Mindful Neuroscience Center in Mexico (clinical private practice and instructor of private training programs), instructor-mentor in BCIA Accredited Didactic Programs, and international instructor of the BFE´s “Learn from the Best” formation programs.


 

WS07 Mindfulness as an Essential Complement of Bio/Neurofeedback
Time: 8:00am-12:00pm
CE Credits: 4
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Intermediate
Session Focus: 100% Clinical Focus
Target Audience: Neuro and biofeedback practitioners who want to go deeper into mindfulness and metacognitive approaches and ways of understanding neuroplasticity.

Participants will learn to apply mindful and metacognitive techniques in conjunction with specific brain training practices such as neurofeedback, HEG, HRV breathing, Cogmed, and Interactive Metronome. I will show that the MIND attitude with which they are practiced profoundly affects BRAIN development and neuroplasticity.  This will be both a didactic and an experiential workshop. Both mind and brain practices will be taught and ways of integrating them. Some research will be reviewed but the emphasis will be throughout on practical clinical skills.

Learning Objectives:

·       Demonstrate facility in using mindfulness and metacognitive strategies
·       Summarize the complementarity between brain and mind based interventions.
·       Utilize brain practices appropriate for different presenting problems.
·       Explain the complementarity between mind and braiPproaches.

Speaker(s):

·       Alfred Collins, PhD, BCN, Alaska Neuro Therapy Crnter: Al Collins holds two PhDs, in Indian Studies and Clinical Psychology. This means he is familiar with the roots of mindfulness in its original languages. He heads a 2-office clinic in Alaska approaching ADHD and ASD from two angles: the mind, using metacognitive and mindfulness strategies, and direct brain training with HRV breathing, neurofeedback, and magnetic/electrical stimulation techniques.

 

WS08 Practical Interventions to Improve Health and Well Being in Adult Learners
Time: 8:00am-12:00pm
CE Credits: 4
Track: Hot Topics
Level: Intermediate
Session Focus: 75% Clinical/25% Research
Target Audience: Psychologists, Physicians, Trainees, Students

The major contemporary chronic physical and emotional illnesses are strongly influenced by the choices that people make, and the actions resulting from those choices. Most of these illnesses are associated with poor quality of life and significant burden of disease. Lifestyle habits develop during the teenage developmental stage and symptoms, such as headache, anxiety and gastrointestinal distress frequently emerge. However, these issues are rarely addressed, until the person demonstrates clinically significant problems later in life. Then, medical and psychiatric resources are expended to treat diagnosed conditions which may have been preventable or modifiable in their earlier stages. The adult learning atmosphere is an ideal environment for students and future health care professionals to increase self-awareness, gain skills to manage subclinical conditions and improve lifestyle habits. The use of social norms and personal feedback will be demonstrated as tools to motivate students to modify their behavior and decrease over reactivity to stress. Building resiliency, the ability to bounce back and to grow through adversity is critical to educational success at the undergraduate and graduate level. Students who are in good health physically and emotionally are able to use their intellectual abilities to the fullest. Similarly, resilient trainees make fewer errors, and are less likely to drop out of the healthcare workforce. The information and case examples which will be presented in this workshop is based on the presenters’ extensive experience in the undergraduate and graduate education environment. We will provide evidence-based models, practical examples and concrete instructions on implementing change strategies to improve lifestyle, decrease symptoms and improve overall well-being in adult learners. Educators/clinicians can implement these practical models in their universities or clinics to provide people with life-long skills to maintain well-being and prevent disease.

Learning Objectives:

·       Provide detailed educational health promoting and stress reduction programs that educators/clinicians can implement in their university or clinics
·       Describe the structure of a 14 session stress management program for college students
·       Provide examples of lifestyle changes that can be accomplished by future healthcare providers in 10 weeks
·       Summarize the importance of self-care pro-health practices to prevent illness onset
·       Demonstrate applications of student programs to clinical settings

Speaker(s):

·       Angele McGrady, PhD, University of Toledo: Dr. McGrady received her B.S. from Chestnut Hill College, her Masters in Physiology from Michigan State University, her Ph.D. in Biology and her M. Ed in Counseling from the University of Toledo. She is a licensed counselor,  certified by the Biofeedback Certification Institute of America and is a certified sports counselor. Currently Dr. McGrady is a professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Toledo Medical Center (UTMC), where she maintains a practice in counseling and biofeedback. Her professional activities include: Past President of the AAPB and current member of the editorial board of “Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback”. Dr. McGrady has experience in many levels of teaching: medical, nursing, physician assistant, graduate and residency.  She has designed wellness programs for medical students, medical residents and college athletes. Her curriculum vita lists 85 peer reviewed articles and book chapters. She and Dr. Donald Moss have co-authored two books. “Pathways to Illness, Pathways to Health” and “Integrative Approaches to Chronic Illness” (2018) were published by Springer. Inc.

·       Erik Peper, PhD, Institute for Holistic Health Studies: Erik Peper, PhD.. BCB, is an international authority on biofeedback and self-regulation and since 1971 he has been researching factors that promote healing. He is Professor of Holistic Health Studies / Department of Health Education at San Francisco State University. He is President of the Biofeedback Foundation of Europe and past President of the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback. He has a biofeedback practice at BiofeedbackHealth (www.biofeedbackhealth.org).  He is an author of numerous scientific articles and books such as Muscle Biofeedback at the Computer, Make Health Happen, Fighting Cancer-A Nontoxic Approach to Treatment, and Biofeedback Mastery.  He publishes the blog, the Peper perspective-ideas on illness, health and well-being (www.peperperspective.com). He is a recognized expert on holistic health, stress management and workplace health. His research interests focus on psychophysiology of healing, illness prevention,, respiratory psychophysiology and optimizing health with biofeedback.

 

WS09 Using Components of the qEEG to Predict Concussions and Enhance Treatment
Time: 8:00am-12:00pm
CE Credits: 4
Track: Hot Topics
Level: Intermediate
Session Focus: 20% Clinical/80% Research
Target Audience: This presentation is designed to demonstrate new ways of using the qEEG to enhance performance.  Anyone who utilizes the qEEG in their practice and wants to expand their patient load should attend.

The presentation will examine the application of four qEEG scales (absolute power, coherence, phase lag & power ratios) in working in different environments.  First the work place of a charitable foundation will be studied examining the results from qEEGs (N = 28) developing individual & group profiles.  Significant deviations of the 4 scales mentioned above are used to develop these profiles.   Based upon the works by Thompson & Thompson this information is then utilized to develop training exercises for the participants.  The presentation will then discuss the use of these scales with hockey players studying the individual players and developing an individual performance enhancement program.    In each part of the presentation the results from the qEEGs will be presented   Participants will then be shown how to use newly developed feedback forms to understand areas of the brain that need strengthening and change the related behaviors to enhance performance.   In each part of the presentation case studies will be featured.

Learning Objectives:

·       gain knowledge of the use of the qEEG in different environments
·       become aware of how the different scales are diffferent in different populations
·       how to develop individual and group treatment plans
·       How to use to qEEG to enhance performance

Speaker(s):

·       Stuart C. Donaldson, PhD, Director/Myosymmetries: Stuart Donaldson received his PhD in Clinical Psychology from the University of Calgary in 1989.  He has been licensed as a psychologist in the province of Alberta since 1977.  His original interests lay in the area of surface electromyography (SEMG) studying muscle activity and low back pain.  His doctoral works lead to the development of the use of SEMG in dynamic assessment and treatment in various muscle conditions, specializing in myofascial pain syndromes.  He studied myofascial pain syndromes, carpal tunnel syndromes, low back pain and headaches.  In 1995 his work on headaches was recognized when he won the prestigious award “The Outstanding Contribution To The Interdisciplinary Pain Management Literature” as presented by the American Journal of Pain Management.    In 1995 he became interested in fibromyalgia combining the SEMG work with qEEG assessments. In 2000 Stu was appointed to the Expert Consensus Panel by the National Fibromyalgia Association and Government of Canada to study and develop a consensus document about fibromyalgia.  He has published extensively in the areas of chronic pain, myofascial pain and fibromyalgia.  He has studied the application of the qEEG in work place environments developing methods to enhance executives' performance, thus  increasing productivity.  His present interests include the use of the qEEG in evaluating concussions (mild traumatic brain injury) in the general population including Junior A Hockey players.  Presently he is conducting a 4-year study of concussions in junior hockey with 2 papers published to date.  He is director of Myosymmetries – a multidisciplinary treatment center.  The clientele seen at Myosymmetries includes mild traumatic brain injury (usually post motor vehicle accidents and sports injuries), anxiety and depression, performance enhancement and ADD.

·       Sohel Shivji, M.Sc, provisional psychologist: A recent graduate from McMaster University in Ontario, Canada joining the Myosymmetries practice in 2016.  Focus of post graduate learning has been in psychophysiology and the treatment of chronic health and wellness disorders.  For 4 years he has been working with junior hockey players conducting research with the qEEG on their play and learning styles working to improve their quality of play.

·       Kelsey Moss, B.Sc, psychological assistant/Myosymmetries: A recent graduate from the University of Victoria Kelsey studied neuro-psychology and cognitive processing.  She is training to become a neuro-therapist.  In addition her duties at Myosymmetries includes research, collating data and writing papers.

 

Lunch Break - ON YOUR OWN
Time: 12:00pm-1:00pm

 

WS10 Develop, Recover, Advance: A Workshop Connecting the Science and Practice of Neurophysiology to Optimize Brain Health
Time: 1:00pm-3:00pm
CE Credits: 2
Track: Basic Science
Level: Introductory
Session Focus: 60% Clinical/40% Research
Target Audience: Clinicians and practitioners who are interested in providing the best practices to help their clients create change.

Information about brain health is being published at rapid pace. Today, mental health providers are likely to be overwhelmed by the constant release of this information and may even be unsure of how to use this knowledge to inform their practice habits. Neurofeedback providers and clinicians, particularly, are in the business to assist in improving this physiology. And while this technique can improve awareness and self-regulation to make changes in the brain, other habits and factors may be implemented to optimize this change. Therefore, understanding the neurophysiology and the implications of habits and lifestyle decisions on the brain is important to optimize the speed of brain change.  This workshop will explore the neurophysiology and it’s impact on brain regulation for several factors, including sleep, nutrition, exercise, meditation, screen time, social media and mindfulness. A review of how these factors can contribute to health or disease will be discussed.

Learning Objectives:

·       Be able to name and discuss three ways in which they can assist their clients in achieving better brain health.
·       Be able to understand hurdles that prevent change in healthy habits from occurring..
·       Be able to provide positive and creative ways that can assist their clients in creating optimal brain health.

Speaker(s):

·       Anne Ward Stevens, PhD, Clinical Neuropsychologist, Integrated Neuroscience Services: Anne Stevens, Ph.D., received her doctoral degree from the University of Memphis in 1995. She has held a license to practice Psychology in the state of Tennessee and currently is licensed in Arkansas, and has practiced in Fayetteville since 1989. Since 2016, Dr. Stevens has been the President of Integrated Neuropsychological Services, with an expertise in head injury and other disorders related to brain functioning. Her practice encompasses neuropsychological and Quantitative EEG Assessment, as well as treatment, primarily through neurofeedback. She has earned board certification through BCIA in Neurofeedback and the QEEG Certification Board for QEEG Technologist. In addition to her private practice, Dr. Stevens serves on the Scientific Advisory Committee of Neurotopia and the Head Trauma Committee at the University of Arkansas Athletic Department. In 2001, she was also the co-founder of ContreQ, specializing in the assessment and treatment of sport-related concussion. Dr. Stevens is a member of good standing with the American Psychological Association, the National Academy of Neuropsychology and the International Society of Neurofeedback and Research. Additionally, Dr. Stevens also served on the Board of Directors for the International Society of Neurofeedback and Research from 2008 until 2012.

 

WS11 Identifying and Treating Brain Injury in Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence with Complex Trauma
Time: 1:00pm-5:00pm
CE Credits: 4
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Introductory
Session Focus: 75%Clinical/25% Research
Target Audience: Clinicians of any skill level interested in improving their ability to provide care for individuals who have experienced physical abuse and are struggling with impacted functionality and complex mental health symptoms.

The mental health impacts of repetitive head trauma and strangulation can be misdiagnosed or dismissed by clinicians who are unfamiliar with how symptoms of traumatic brain injury often overlap with emotional lability, cognitive dysfunction, and behavioral challenges, negatively impacting clinical care for survivors of domestic violence.  This session will discuss clinical strategies to improve provider competency in identifying and addressing traumatic brain injury in clients with histories of intimate partner violence, complex trauma and multiple mental health concerns.    In an article published this summer in the Journal of Women's Health, researchers observed that the front line service providers to individuals impacted by intimate partner violence demonstrated insufficient ability to recognize the signs of traumatic brain injury in battered women and provide effective support (Haag, 2019). Another article in Family Community Health (St. Ivany, 2016) states that a review of available literature indicated 60% to 92% of abused women have an intimate partner violence correlated traumatic brain injury. The Professional Counselor Journal states is estimated that as many as 23 million women in America are currently living with brain injuries incurred from domestic violence (Smith, 2019).     Fear, social conditioning and shame around domestic violence and abuse impact the willingness of survivors to speak up about how they acquired their injuries, but even more troubling is how frequently they report their clinical care providers never asked them specifically about a history of intimate partner violence (Zieman, 2017). Effective treatment planning for this critically under served population hinges on clinicians who can appropriately identify underlying brain trauma in women with complex symptom presentation.     During this workshop various treatment strategies will be discussed, including sensory grounding techniques and neurofeedback approaches, in the context of clinical case presentations and framed by a review of the most recently published relevant literature.

Learning Objectives:

·       Demonstrate familiarity with the current literature on the prevalence of undiagnosed brain injury in survivors of domestic violence
·       Adapt clinical intake procedures to better identify possible brain trauma in populations at risk for domestic violence
·       Apply strategies to manage personal distress and discomfort and improve clinical care skills for physically abused clients
·       Teach clients how to self-soothe using appropriate sensory grounding techniques
·       Develop treatment plans which include neurofeedback for brain injury and complex trauma

Speaker(s):

·       Penijean Gracefire, LMHC, BCN, qEEG-D, BrainStar Innovations: Penijean Gracefire is a neural frequency analyst and published author who rides motorcycles, drinks tea, and designs therapeutic interventions using 3D brain imaging technology. As a licensed mental health clinician, she integrates emotional experience with electrophysiology to alter neural dynamics in real time, helping people recover from trauma or improve brain flexibility and resiliency. Penijean’s groundbreaking work has led to industry-wide changes in neurotherapy, and is the basis for current standards in international certification. Her passions include spectral analysis, donuts, and taking things apart to see how they work.

 

WS12 Bringing Results Home: Using Portable Neurofeedback and Virtual Reality Devices to Improve Patient Treatment Adherence
Time: 1:00pm-5:00pm
CE Credits: 4
Track: Hot Topics
Level: Intermediate
Session Focus: 70%Clinical/30% Research
Target Audience: Those looking to attend should have a strong interest in learning about and using technology in clinical practice. They should have a basic knowledge of psychological disorders and conditions and common cognitive and behavioral treatment practices.

Technology has evolved over the last 30 years in clinical practice. Dr. Reiner and his team have been at the forefront of this evolution and have been integral in adapting principles of learning theory from the behaviorists to include new technology such as biofeedback, neurofeedback, virtual reality, magnetic and photic stimulation. This combined approach has provided patients with great capacity to regulate a variety of common psychological complaints from depression to anxiety with greater speed and efficiency. qEEG brain mapping has given us a tremendous ability to provide insight for patients into their psychological issues with a higher degree of specificity. We have all been amazed by the results seen by committed patients who complete a full course of neurofeedback training in the office. But with 20-­40 sessions on average necessary to maintain gains with training 2 to 3 times per week in the office this perceived cost and time expenditure can seem daunting for many. Using a modified muse headset powered by Myndlift neurofeedback software paired with an external electrode now neurofeedback can be done remotely. Similarly, Phobic anxiety is best treated by exposure therapy, but clients balk at the thought of going into an elevator or plane. Virtual reality is an immersive and portable solution. Powered by mobile phones and controlled via an online web platform the clinician can now reach beyond the limits of the office and help provide the consistency necessary for real change. In our cutting edge presentation we will take aspiring clinicians through case presentations, protocols and hands-­on demonstrations with the latest tech.

Learning Objectives:

·       Summarize history of learning theory and evolution of technology in the treatment of phobias
·       Utilize common protocols for treating adults and children using bio, neurofeedback, virtual reality and photobiomodulation.
·       Practice how to translate data obtained in the lab to deploy in home training devices

Speaker(s):

·       Robert Reiner, PhD, BCB, BCN, Psychologist, Director/Behavioral Associates: Dr. Reiner has been a pioneer in the NY tristate area in expanding the use of biofeedback into clinical practice. He is a regular instructor in BCIA certification seminars. He has been featured on local and national media outlets for his expertise in innovative virtual reality enhanced treatments for Phobias and Anxiety Disorders including National Geographic, Fox and MTV. He is the founder and CEO of Behavioral Associates, a large group practice focusing on utilizing biofeedback to treat a variety of psychological and physical conditions ranging from Chronic Pain to Video Game Addiction. He is known for integrating psychophysiological assessments with psychological and neuropsychological data to tailor treatment protocols to patients.

 

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