Thursday Schedule

 

Thursday, November 5, 2020

Time: 6:00am-7:00am
Yoga/Meditation

Time: 7:00am-8:00am
Continental Breakfast

Time: 7:00am-7:00pm
Registration
 

EXDEMO1 Exhibitor Demo 1: Cambridge Brain Sciences
Time: 8:00am-9:00am
CE Credits: 0

 

BOS01 Client Experiences of a Brief Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback Protocol
Time: 8am-9am
CE Credits: 1
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Introductory
Session Focus: 50% Clinical/50% Research
Target Audience: Psychologists and psychology trainees interested in using biofeedback interventions to help clients with stress management.

We conducted a qualitative study of clients’ experiences of a brief biofeedback protocol. The protocol features heart rate variability biofeedback (HRVB) with electromyography (EMG), skin conductance (SC), and hand temperature (HT) as adjunct biofeedback modalities. It is therefore called the HRVB+ protocol. The goals of the HRVB+ protocol are to (1) build clients’ awareness of their physiological symptoms of stress and (2) provide clients with knowledge and skills that will help them improve their ability to regulate stress by teaching them to breath diaphragmatically at their resonant frequency (RF).     This study is a novel contribution because very few studies have attempted to investigate clients’ experiences of any kind of biofeedback intervention.  Fifteen clients were be interviewed and the data analyzed according to the methods of Consensual Qualitative Research (CQR; Hill, 2012). CQR relies on the use of group consensus to construct representations of participant experiences and categorize themes within the data and is suitable to answer the research question of how clients experience the HRVB+ protocol.    We will discuss the findings of the present study that are of practical use to biofeedback clinicians. This will include discussion the role of common factors in biofeedback treatment. Additionally, we will bring research assistants (not participants) who have experienced the HRVB+ protocol to comment and answer questions.

Learning Objectives:

· Understand client motivations and expectations for biofeedback
· Understand what clinician characteristics are perceived as beneficial by biofeedback clients
· Understand aspects of biofeedback interventions that clients may perceive as unhelpful or negative
· Understand the role of common factors in biofeedback interventions

Speaker(s):

· Sheilagh Fox, M.S., Brigham Young University: Sheilagh is a doctoral candidate in clinical psychology at Brigham Young University. Her research interests include psychological intervention outcome and process.
· Eric Ghelfi, MS, Brigham Young University: Eric Ghelfi is a doctoral candidate in clinical psychology at Brigham Young University. His research interests include psychotherapy.
· Hannah Erickson, N/A, Brigham Young University: Hannah Erickson is an undergraduate research assistant studying psychology.
· Kellsie Giras, N/A, Brigham Young University: Kellsie Giras is an undergraduate research assistant studying psychology.
· Vernie DeMille, N/A, Brigham Young University: Vernie DeMille is an undergraduate research assistant studying psychology.
· Elizabeth Kenning
· Ty Johnson
· Ashlie Thacker
· Melissa Goates-Jones, PhD

 

BOS02 Neurofeedback in Healthy Elderly at Risk of Cognitive Decline
Time: 8am-9am
CE Credits: 1
Track: Basic Science
Level: Intermediate
Session Focus: 25% Clinical/75% Research
Target Audience: Clinicians that incorporate NFB into their practice and wish too expand their knowledge on evidence-based protocols.   Clinical researchers who wish to learn of the incorporation of neurobiological tools for the evaluation of NFB outcomes.

There has been an increase in the incidence of neurocognitive disorders in the last decades as a consequence of the increase of life expectancy, since aging is the main risk factor for these pathologies. An excess of theta activity determined by a quantitative and normative electroencephalography analysis (qEEG) has been considered a risk factor for the development of cognitive decline in healthy elderly.  Taking this idea into account, we present the results of several experiments comparing two populations of healthy elderly: 1) those with normal qEEG and 2) those with abnormally high values of theta absolute power. These experiments include the use of different neurobiological tools such as event-related potentials (ERPs), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and salivary cortisol analyses, as well as neuropsychological batteries in order to better characterize the subclinical pathological process that might be developing in the latter population.  Moreover, the efficacy of two z-neurofeedback (NFB) protocols (i.e., surface NFB and sLORETA NFB) was evaluated. The main objective is to provide an evidence-based rationale for the development of these two protocols, as well as to highlight the importance of the use of neurobiological tools for the assessment of treatment outcomes. This will allow the field of neurofeedback to gain more credibility among the scientific community and may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the cognitive and behavioral improvement that follows NFB interventions.  This contributes to the idea that normalizing an abnormal excess of theta activity might have beneficial effects on cognition in this elderly subpopulation. Furthermore, this risk for developing cognitive decline is typically not detected until the clinical syndrome is established, regardless of its ethiology. For this reason, detection by means of qEEG, which constitutres a low-cost technique, may lead to early interventions that might even delay the onset of the symptoms.|

Learning Objectives:

· Analyze the value of qEEG in the identification of subclinical pathological processes.
· Explain the mechanisms underlying cognitive decline during aging.
· Discuss the importance of evidence-based and neurobiology-focused development of NFB protocols.
· Discuss the possible neural mechanisms underlying NFB.

Speaker(s):

Mauricio González-López, BCN, Institute of Neurobiology, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México: Mauricio González-López, BCN is a licensed clinical psychologist specializing in applied psychophysiology using biofeedback and neurofeedback, along with cognitive-behavioral therapy. He has worked as assistant researcher in the Laboratory of Psychophysiology in the Institute of Neurobiology of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México where he currently works in his PhD dissertation.  His research is focused on cognitive aging, using different neurobiological tools in order to characterize a population of healthy adults at risk of cognitive decline. The main objective is to develop a Neurofeedback protocol to enhance cognitive performance in this population.  He has served as speaker in multiple national and international conferences and meetings. He is a member of the Board of Directors for the Mexican Society of Bio and Neurofeedback and an international member of the International Society for Neurofeedback Research.

 

BOS03 Multi-Cultural and Diversity in Practice and Research Settings
Time: 8am-9am
CE Credits: 1
Track: Basic Science
Level: Introductory
Session Focus: 50% Clinical/50% Research
Target Audience: Clinicians, Researchers and Administrators

This proposed short course identifies considerations related to multi-cultural and diversity training useful for research, education and clinical professionals.  The short course presents current models and terminology which can extend educator and clinician awareness about multicultural diversity.      Participants will learn three basic models of multicultural diversity focusing on cultural a) competence, b) efficacy and, c) humility; as well as a continuum of organizational development as described by the National Center for Cultural Competence (NCCC).  For example, the publication Towards a Culturally Competent System of Care asserts cultural competence occurs on a continuum of stages identified as: 1) cultural destructiveness (e.g. attitudes, policies and practices that are undermining of a cultural group);  2) cultural incapacity (e.g. lack of ability to respond to culturally and linguistically diverse groups);  3) cultural blindness (e.g. treating all people as the same without resources for acquiring knowledge about diverse cultures); 4) cultural pre-competence (e.g. commitment to supporting civil and human rights however without a plan for achieving organizational or individual multi-cultural diversity training);  5) cultural competency (e.g. dedicated resources for ongoing training and support of multi-cultural diversity); 6) cross-cultural efficacy and proficiency (e.g. active pursuit of social justice and advocacy for disadvantaged diverse multi-cultural experiences); and,   7) cultural humility (e.g. engaging in regular self-evaluation).

Learning Objectives:

· Summarize three basic models used in Multicultural diversity training
· Identify stages of awareness about multicultural diversity within health education and healthcare organizations
· State methods for implementing multicultural diversity awareness training curriculums for individuals and organizations.

Speaker(s):
Rick Harvey, PhD, San Francisco State University: Richard Harvey, Ph.D.  Associate Professor, Institute of Holistic Health Studies and   Department of Recreation, Parks and Toruism  Education: Doctorate in Health Psychology from University of California, Irvine    Field of Specialization: Holistic Health, Hardiness Training, Technology Related Disorders, Stress Psychophysiology.    Current Projects: His research includes developing stress-reduction interventions teaching psychological courage and hardiness to reduce strain reactions, including technology-related disorders, as well as tobacco cessation and health promotion interventions for high-risk youth. He has published in all of these areas.  Before coming to SF State, he ran a UC Biofeedback and Stress Management Program and worked as an Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health (MCAH) Epidemiologist in Orange County, California. Professional associations include the: American Psychological Association (APA), American Public Health Association (APHA), Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback (AAPB), the Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM), Society for Research on Nicotine and tobacco (SRNT), and the Western Association for Biofeedback and Neuroscience (WABN).

 

BOS04 Overcoming Anxiety and Negative Thoughts for High Performance
Time: 8am-9am
CE Credits: 1
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Advanced
Session Focus: 70% Clinical/30% Research
Target Audience: Clinicians and researchers interested in optimizing human health and performance.

As students or athletes experience physical as well as emotional anxiety, whether related to a health or performance goal, there is a tendency for accelerated negative thinking.  Sometimes, the individual will experience a cascade of doubts before engaging in a competitive moment.  Others may have difficulty screening out negative thoughts while performing.  The ability to turn off the mind and stay positive following performance is critical for recovery.  Many peak performers, ranging from medical doctors to elite athletes, experience a cardiovascular response with their heart rate pounding in their chest or unconsciously communicate feelings of defeat to their brain through their reclined posture.  The purpose of this one-hour joint presentation is to explore frequent challenges that high performers face in controlling their thoughts such as rigid thinking, feeling trapped or stuck, and negative self-talk.  Presenters will then introduce specific physiological strategies, for addressing these challenges, which are based on research and clinical experiences, working around the world with high-performance individuals in music, the arts, business, and sports. Through an interactive, experiential based presentation, participants will learn clinically useful skills for not only conquering anxiety but to improve cognitive functioning during critical moments.

Learning Objectives:

· Discuss concepts of posture, breathing, and mindfulness and their relevance to cognitive functioning
· Identify frequent cognitive challenges that high performing individuals face before, during, and after competitions.
· Observe and experience specific postural and HRV biofeedback techniques for reducing rigidity and increasing openness of thoughts and emotions.
· Experience how these biofeedback-based skills can be used to effectively and quickly improve cognitive agility.
· Learn how to apply these skills in training high performing individuals to your own practice.

Speaker(s):

· Leah Lagos, Psyd, BCB, Dr. Leah Lagos, LLC: Speaker Bio: Leah Lagos, PsyD, is a clinical and sport psychologist and BCIA Board Certified biofeedback provider in Manhattan, New York. She earned a doctorate in clinical psychology, with a specialization in sport psychology, from Rutgers University. During her senior year of graduate school, Dr. Lagos was appointed  as a faculty member of the Center of Alcohol Studies at Rutgers University to create and operate a biofeedback center for Rutgers' athletes. Highlights of her work with athletes include conducting interviews for NFL teams, as part of Professional Sports Consultants, for more than 9 years. Dr. Lagos has served as a consultant to PGA tour players to provide on-site support at tournaments such as the Masters' Tournament in Augusta, GA. Dr. Lagos has also served as a consultant to US Olympians providing consultation and on-site support at venues such as the London Olympics. As a consulting psychological expert for the media, Dr. Lagos has appeared on the Today Show, NBC Nightly, MSNBC, CNN, CBS, Fox, Sports Illustrated News and ESPN. She is a consulting editor for Biofeedback Magazine: Clinical Journal and was the Guest Editor of the 2015 spring issue. She is the Co-Chair of the Optimal Performance Section of the American Association of Physiology and Biofeedback. Dr. Lagos is also an appointed biofeedback provider for athletes and patients of several hospital programs in the New York metro area.

· Erik Peper, PhD, BCB, San Francisco State University: Erik Peper, PhD., is an internationally known expert on holistic health, stress management, and biofeedback. He is a professor at San Francisco State University, where he was instrumental in establishing the Institute for Holistic Health Studies, the first holistic health program at a public university in the U.S. He is president of the Biofeedback Federation of Europe (BFE) and former president of the Association for Applied Psychophysiology. He has received numerous awards such as the State of California Governor’s Employee Safety Award in 2004 for his contributions to improving workplace health for computer users, the 2005 Sheila Adler Award from AAPB for his efforts to support and encourage student participation, and the 2011 Recipient of the Biofeedback Foundation of Europe Educator Award. He is an author of numerous scientific articles and books: Biofeedback Mastery, Muscle Biofeedback at the Computer, Make Health Happen Training: Yourself to Create Wellness, De Computermens and Fighting Cancer-A Nontoxic Approach to Treatment. He has a biofeedback practice at BiofeedbackHealth in Berkeley, California (www.biofeedbackhealth.org) and publishes a blog The peperperspective: Ideas on illness, health and well-being (www.peperperspective.com). He has been an invited speaker at international conference in the United States, Europe and Asia and is recognized expert on holistic health, stress management and workplace health. His research interests focus upon strategies to optimize health, illness prevention, holistic health, healthy computing, and respiratory psychophysiology.

 

BOS05 What Our QEEG May be Missing in Children’s Brains: Ethical Considerations for Practice
Time: 8am-9am
CE Credits: 1
Track: Hot Topics
Level: Intermediate
Session Focus: 50% Clinical/50% Research
Target Audience: This presentation is targeted for all of those who treat children and adolescents even if they do not do qEEGs or NEUROFEEDBACK.

Children and adolescents are very difficult to treat, both with medication and therapies including neurofeedback. Efforts to treat based solely on the presenting symptoms too often fail. There may be neurological abnormalities that the quantitative electroencephalogram (qEEG) is unable to discern. During this of rapid brain growth, as puberty approaches and hormonal surges occur, we see a variety of ever-changing symptoms. Stimulants that address challenges with focus, attention, and hyperactivity are prescribed first. Antidepressants are prescribed to treat anxiety. With the onset of puberty, behavioral issues are commonly treated with antipsychotics. All stimulants, antidepressants, and antipsychotics lower seizure threshold and increase the likelihood of brain instability. At least a third of children and adolescents who have had a negative response to past medication trials have isolated epileptiform discharges (IEDs). In a recent study of 772 children and adolescents without epilepsy, we identified 286 (37%) to have IEDs. In the last decade, multiple studies have found a high prevalence of IEDs across multiple diagnoses. As neurofeedback clinicians, we often see children on multiple medications and, if they have IEDs, we are trying to counter factors that the medication is making worse. QEEG brain mapping fails to identify IEDs for two reasons. First, the qEEG artifacting process removes or averages out IEDs. Second, only a board certified electroencephalographer has the training to detect subtle abnormalities.  Without this interpretation, protocols to address the IEDs cannot be made from just the qEEG data alone as they will remain unidentified. Psychiatrists need to be made aware of IEDs. Having a report from an MD who is a board certified electroencephalographer goes a long way to a working relationship with treating psychiatrists.

Learning Objectives:

· What brain abnormalities can be made worse by commonly prescribed medications for children
· What is a very common EEG abnormality in children and adolescents.
· Why it is important to have the EEG read by an MD board certified in electroencephalography
· Why it is ethically important for clinicians not to comment on what abnormalities they see in the EEG
· Be able to identify the two reasons the qEEG is unable to identify isolated epileptiform discharges

Speaker(s):

· Ronald J. Swatzyna, PhD, LCSW, Director of Electro-Neuro Analysis Research, The Tarnow Center: Ronald J. Swatzyna, PhD received his MSSW and PhD from The University of Texas Arlington. He is the Director of Electro-Neuro Analysis Research and Director of Neurotherapy at the Tarnow Center in Houston, Texas. Dr. Swatzyna is a LCSW, and is board certified in neurofeedback and biofeedback by the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance (BCIA). For the past 22 years, he has analyzed and treated the most diagnostically challenging cases. Fifteen years ago, he started using EEG and qEEG data to assist psychiatrists in medication selection and titration. As a researcher, he has presented and/or published 80 peer-reviewed papers on brain dysfunction and psychotropic medication at national and international conferences and now is a member of the Neuropsychiatric Electrophysiology Section of the World Psychiatric Association. Dr. Swatzyna is a US Air Force veteran of Vietnam and the first Gulf War and, he is a retired professional firefighter-EMT.

· Robert P. Turner, MD, MSCR, BCN, QEEG-D, Network Neurology: Robert P. Truner, MD is a board certified in Psychiatry and Neurology, Pediatrics, Electrodiagnostic Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology, Epileptology, Neurorehabilitation, Neurodevelopmental Disabilities, Neurofeedback and qEEG-D. He is the director of Network Neurology, Charleston, South Carolina. Dr. Turner is also an Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics & Neurology, University of South Carolina School of Medicine & Palmetto Health Richland Children's Hospital, Columbia, South Carolina, Department of Pediatrics Community Faculty, Bon Secours Roper-St Francis Hospital System, Charleston, and Associate Researcher, MIND Research Institute, Irvine, California. Recently, he just joined Clinical NeuroAnalytics and is doing their qEEGs.

 

BOS35 Cognition and Quality of Life in Pediatric Focal Epilepsy: An Exploratory Randomized Double-blinded Sham-controlled 3-parallel-arm Trial of Neurofeedback
Time: 8am-9am
CE Credits: 1
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Intermediate
Session Focus: 50% Clinical/50% Research
Target Audience: Physicians, psychologist,  researcher, students

Current conventional epilepsy treatments are not always considering to improve epilepsy comorbidities. The effectiveness of the treatment is not necessary to keep a state of seizure-free, but rather an improvement in functions to help people who suffer from epilepsy to become more independent and productive in life. There is an urgent need to explore non- pharmaceutical/non-invasive interventions that can help in that regard. The earlier patients are treated with this condition, the more likely it is to prevent severe disabilities over time. Neurofeedback is a self-modulatory brain activity oscillatory intervention that previous researchers have found to reduce seizure frequency in patients with epilepsy. The aim of this presentation is to showed the results of a recent publication that is about to be published comparing two Neurofeedback techniques that have shown some efficacy in improving symptoms in epilepsy.  The novelty of this study is to explore further and included clinical, neurophysiological and cognitive outcomes in order to assess in more detail the effectiveness of epilepsy comorbidities.

Learning Objectives:

· Understand epilepsy and their comorbidities in order to have a better clinical approach.
· Understand the two neurofeedback modalities studied to be effective treating epilepsy
· Understand the importance of clinical assessments to evaluate progress in epilepsy
· NFB can improve cognitive performance in pediatric participants with pharmacoresponsive focal epilepsy.

Speaker(s):

· Diana Martinez, MD PhD, Boston Neurodynamics: Diana is a medical doctor with a specialty in Neurorehabilitation. She received her medical degree from University of Aguascalientes, Mexico in 2002, Fellowship in Neurological Rehabilitation from IAHP, Philadelphia, USA in 2006; M.Sc in Neurological Rehabilitation in 2009, Fellowship in Neurophysiology from University Hospital, Cleveland, USA in 2012 and PhD from De Montfort University from Leicester, UK in 2018. She has 15 years of experience treating severe brain injured patients in United States, Mexico, Spain, Italy, China, Brazil, Colombia and Honduras. She developed, along with other professionals, an integrative intervention to rehabilitated neurological conditions including neurofeedback and other non-invasive brain stimulation techniques. She is the CEO (since 2012) of Neocemod (Neuromodulation Center), Mexico City and Aguascalientes, Mexico, with experience treating patients with epilepsy, learning disorders, behavioral disorder, mood disorders, sleep disorders, TBI and CP. She has extensive experience in neurophysiology, EEG/qEEG/ERP interpretation. Also, she is an international consultant for Neurofeedback professionals and currently she combines clinical work, and research; which lead to study the effects of Neurofeedback in epilepsy for her PhD thesis. She continues received invitations to give lectures and workshops for ISNR, BFE, NRBS and SMNB (Mexican Neurofeedback society) and other international neurological and neurophysiology societies. In 2017 she became the Director of Neurofeedback Clinic at Trauma Center at JRI in Boston and currently she is cofounder of Boston Neurodynamics offering high quality training and consulting for neurophysiological evaluations, neurofeedback,biofeedback and noninvasive brain stimulation interventions. She is the current president of the Mexican NEUROFEEDBACK Society.

 

ORAL1 Oral Presentations - Session 1
Time: 8am-9am
CE Credits: 1
Track: Hot Topics
Level: Intermediate
Session Focus:
Target Audience: All

1. Transcending Bio and Neurofeedback: Clinical Process in the Applied Neuropsychophysiological Paradigm (A Transdisciplinary, Evidence Based Approach), David Arroyo, Psic.Npf, BCB, Universidad del Valle de Mexico, Hospital StarMedica Queretaro, Sociedad Mexicana de Bio y Neurorretroalimentación

The clinical process in health sciences aims to gather, organize and interpret sufficient data that makes possible for us to make an adequate evaluation of a given situation and to develop and implement a truly effective treatment plan or intervention to help our patient or client. Nowadays, the paradigm in which clinical process is currently based has proved to be insufficient to achieve those goals successfully as it may because it usually underutilizes the full capacity of the resources that modern scientific and technological advances can provide, or otherwise, it may rely too much on these developments and dismiss the human dimension of the patient or client and most of the factors and variables that play a key role in attaining a real state of wellbeing, when that’s possible. Transdisciplinarity connotes a philosophical foundation and a practical strategy that crosses many disciplinary boundaries to create a comprehensive approach that helps understand situations and solve problems in a way where a “one-way approach” may be insufficient. Because of it´s transdisciplinary nature, the Applied Neuropsychophysiology Paradigm requires the consideration of the human being in all of his physical, mental, social - and even spiritual - dimensions in a holistic manner, taking into account a great number of intrinsic and extrinsic variables that can alter its health status and relying on the latest technology to thus be able to accomplish a much more effective clinical process, from the potential to obtain more accurate multifactorial diagnoses -that even allows us to assess objectively what is traditionally considered subjective-; to help us implement treatment programs that could complement other conventional treatments increasing their effectiveness or to replace them with new options which can be less intrusive with fewer undesirable side effects with a higher rate of success improving the life´s quality and functional capacity.


2. The Skin Temperature Feedback, Len Ochs, PhD, Private Practice

There's a great deal more to know about Skin Temperature Feedback than has been recognized in the field. Thoughts of placement restrictions and useful benefits have historically been limited. We can go far beyond helping people with migraines, Reynaud's Syndrome and warming of the hands to improving mood, cognition, and an untapped limit to pain elimination. With a new understanding of the breadth and impact of the vasculature, sensors can be placed just about anywhere. The effects are intermingled, unspecific to placement and unique to the person being treated. For example, when placed for elimination of pain, mood and cognitive gains are also observed.

3. Neurorehabilitation Program Using Bio-photo/Electromagnetic Stimulation Wearable , Victoria L. Ibric, MD, PhD, BCN,President/ Neurofeedback and NeuroRehab Institute, Inc; Michele Owes, BS, BCN, Research Associate/ Neurofeedback and NeuroRehab Institute, Inc; Liviu G. Dragomirescu, PhD, Biostatistician/ Neurofeedback and NeuroRehab Institute, Inc

Twenty-four clients, 10-86 y/o, volunteered for this study: participants, previously diagnosed and treated by their own physicians or psychologists for a variety of conditions such as, ADHD, LD, fibromyalgia and other pain syndromes, sleep disorders, post stroke, post-concussion syndrome, asthma, COPD and memory dysfunctions. Before the study commenced, a battery of subjective tests (DSM-5, Amen ADD questionnaires) were completed and medical history collected. Prior to the beginning of the study, clients were evaluated cognitively with the IVA-QS continuous performance test.  In most cases, parents, spouses or close family members completed bi-weekly evaluations, to monitor the specific changes in client’s overall health condition and progress.  After each session participants completed a questionnaire. Neuro-stimulation sessions were offered three times per week, half an hour each session, for 20 – 40 consecutive sessions. The cognitive functions were re-evaluated with the same IVA-QS battery, as used at the start of the study, after 20 and after 40 consecutive sessions of Neuro-Stimulation. Majority of the participants benefited from the Neuro-Stimulation program obtaining remarkable physical, emotional and cognitive improvements. Objectively the IVA-QS showed significant and continuous improvements. No negative side effects have been reported from this training. Conclusion: The Neurodynamic Activator™, as a unique standalone brain trainer, shown to be a useful device that benefited all the participants and the benefits obtained and reported at the end of the study, continued to be sustained 18 months later, after the completion of the Neuro-Stimulation. Other light/bio-photo-stimulation methods will be discussed.

 

KEY02 Whither Happiness? When, How, and Why Might Positive Activities Boost vs. Undermine Well-Being
Time: 9:15am-10:30am
CE Credits: 1
Track
Level
Session Focus
Target Audience: All

Happiness not only feels good; it is good. Happy people have more stable marriages, superior health, and higher incomes. Fortunately, experiments have shown that people can intentionally increase their happiness. In this presentation, I will describe my work on the “how” of happiness — that is, when and why such practices as gratitude or kindness work “best,” and how small and simple activities can transform people into happier and more flourishing individuals. I will introduce the positive activity model (Lyubomirsky & Layous, 2013), which describes when and why positive activities are more (or less) successful at boosting well-being, and propose several ways by which engaging in presumably happiness-increasing activities may actually backfire.

Learning Objectives:

· Participants will describe one empirical research example showing how the experience of frequent positive emotions benefits relationships, work, and health.
· Participants will list three intentional activities that have been shown to increase happiness, and describe at least one study that supports the efficacy of each of these three activities.
· Participants will list three factors that moderate (or impact) the success of activities aimed at increasing happiness.
· Participants will identify one empirical research example of how positive activities improve not only happiness but other areas of life.

Speaker(s):

· Sonja Lyubomirsky, PhD, Distinguished Professor and Vice Chair, University of California, Riverside: Sonja Lyubomirsky (AB Harvard, summa cum laude; PhD Stanford) is Distinguished Professor and Vice Chair of Psychology at the University of California, Riverside and author of The How of Happiness and The Myths of Happiness, published in 36 countries. Lyubomirsky’s research focuses on the benefits of happiness, why some people are happier than others, and how happiness can be durably increased. Her work have received many grants and honors, including the Diener Award for Outstanding Midcareer Contributions in Personality Psychology, the Distinguished Research Lecturer Award, a Templeton Positive Psychology Prize, and the Faculty of the Year award (twice). She has four kids, ages 6 to 20, and lives in Santa Monica, California.

 

ORAL2 ORAL PRESENTATIONS - Session 2
Time: 11am-12:30pm
CE Credits: 1.5
Track: Hot Topics
Level: Intermediate
Session Focus:
Target Audience: All

1. Breathing is not always in phase with heart rate variability during resonance frequency breathing, Paul Lehrer, PhD, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

Previous research on young people has found that the  phase relationship between heart period (HP) and breathing is approximately 180 degrees (or for heart rate, 0 degrees) during resonance frequency breathing. We analyzed this phase relationship for 5-min periods  among 26 adults from a recent study of heart rate variability biofeedback to treat adults with mild to moderate currently symptomatic asthma, ages between 18 and 75. We calculated rate variability for all frequencies in the low frequency range (0.05-0.15 Hz). For the frequency with the highest HRV amplitude, usually close to 0.1 Hz, we calculated coherence, transfer function, and phase between cardiac interbeat interval and the respiration curve, using the WinCPRS program . Among records with coherence > 0.8, we found a phase relationship of 95 degrees with HPl, or about 51 degrees with heart rate, with heart rate preceding breathing. We computed Spearman correlation coefficients between phase and various subject characteristics, partialling out age, gende and  height.. We found no relationship between phase and gender, height, or asthma symptoms. However, when controlled for gender and height, we found a significant correlation between phase and age, with younger participants having values closer to 180 degrees, r = 0.47, p < 0.03.   Cardiovascular characteristics of older people may affect the phase relationship. Despite the deviation from the in-phase relationship, particularly among older individuals, breathing nevertheless presumably stimulated the baroreflex, as shown by high-amplitude heart rate oscillations. In this case, heart rate appeared to have been stimulated in the middle of its swing in each direction, but not at the extremes of each swing. Implications are discussed for treatment of lung diseases, as well as for HRV biofeedback training protocols.


2. Boosting CO2 to Stop Migraines, Chris Gilbert, PhD, Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, UCSF; Inna Khazan, PhD, BCB, Faculty, Harvard Medical School

In addition to medication, vagal nerve stimulation, trans-cranial stimulation, surgery, and acupuncture, treatment of chronic migraines using biofeedback has had some success. A promising new self-regulation approach involves increasing the  blood concentration of CO2 to abort migraine at the aura stage, when cerebral hypoxia apparently occurs. Slightly higher CO2 (hypercapnia) promotes vasodilation and boosts cerebral perfusion and thus available oxygen. This approach was proved effective most recently in a well-designed Danish study using a partial-rebreathing bag to raise blood CO2 moderately above normal at the onset of migraine aura. A similar result may be achieved, however, using end-tidal CO2 biofeedback (capnometry) to train migraineurs to raise their CO2 level by slightly reducing their breathing (hypoventilation). Along with presenting the background and details of this approach, we will describe the process with a few case studies.

3. Adding heart rate variability biofeedback to a remote digital intervention for depression, Valerie Forman Hoffman, PhD, MPH, Head of Research, Meru Health Inc.

A rise in the prevalence of depression underscores the need for accessible and effective interventions. The objectives of this study were to determine if the addition of a treatment component showing promise in treating depression, heart rate variability-biofeedback (HRV-B), to our original smartphone-based, 8-week digital intervention was feasible and whether patients in the HRV-B (“enhanced”) intervention were more likely to experience clinically significant improvements in depressive symptoms than patients in our original (“standard”) intervention. We used a quasi-experimental, non-equivalent (matched) groups design to compare changes in symptoms of depression in the enhanced group (n = 48) to historical outcome data from the standard group (n = 48). Patients in the enhanced group completed a total average of 3.86 hours of HRV-B practice across 25.8 sessions, and were more likely to report a clinically significant improvement in depressive symptom score post-intervention than participants in the standard group, even after adjusting for differences in demographics and engagement between groups (adjusted OR = 3.44, 95% CI [1.28 – 9.26], P = .015). Our findings suggest that adding HRV-B to an app-based, smartphone-delivered, remote intervention for depression is feasible and may enhance treatment outcomes.

4. An Exploration of Frequency Domain Norms for Undergraduates, Marilise Stamps, Truman State University; Kimberly Ramos; Brandon Schaff; Dr. Fredric Shaffer (mentor)

This presentation provides an in-depth analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) frequency domain norms for 103 undergraduates (53 men and 50 women) 18 to 26 years of age to aid clinicians and researchers. A Thought Technology ProComp™ Infiniti system monitored ECG (electrocardiogram), respiration, and accessory surface electromyogram (SEMG). Active ECG electrodes were placed about 2 inches above the navel and 4 inches to the left and right of the midline and the reference electrode was centered over the angle of the sternum. A respirometer was positioned over the navel to measure abdominal excursion and respiration rate. SEMG active electrodes were placed over the belly of the right trapezius and scalene muscles, with the reference electrode over the spine. Participants were stabilized for 5 minutes and then monitored for 5 minutes sitting upright, with eyes open, no feedback, and instructions to breathe normally. Data were artifacted within CardioPro and then detrended in Kubios 3.0 using a smoothness priors procedure. Frequency domain analysis utilized a Fast Fourier Transformation-based Welch’s periodogram procedure and autoregressive analysis. Means, standard deviations, and confidence intervals were calculated for HRV time frequency domain measures (absolute VLF, LF, and HF power, normalized LF and HF power, and LF/HF ratio). A Principal Components Analysis of the natural logarithm of the mean values revealed interrelationships between HRV measurements.

5. An Exploration of Nonlinear Norms for Undergraduates, Marilise Stamps, Truman State University; Tyler Andler; Luke Holliday; Dr. Fredric Shaffer (mentor)

This presentation provides an in-depth analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) frequency domain norms for 103 undergraduates (53 men and 50 women) 18 to 26 years of age to aid clinicians and researchers. A Thought Technology ProComp™ Infiniti system monitored ECG (electrocardiogram), respiration, and accessory surface electromyogram (SEMG). Active ECG electrodes were placed about 2 inches above the navel and 4 inches to the left and right of the midline and the reference electrode was centered over the angle of the sternum. A respirometer was positioned over the navel to measure abdominal excursion and respiration rate. SEMG active electrodes were placed over the belly of the right trapezius and scalene muscles, with the reference electrode over the spine. Participants were stabilized for 5 minutes and then monitored for 5 minutes sitting upright, with eyes open, no feedback, and instructions to breathe normally. Data were artifacted within CardioPro and then detrended in Kubios 3.0 using a smoothness priors procedure. Means, standard deviations, and confidence intervals were calculated for nine HRV nonlinear measures: SD1, SD2, ApEn, SampEn, D2, detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) indices ɑ1 and β1, and recurrence plot analysis (RPA) indices DET and ShanEn. A Principal Components Analysis of the natural logarithm of the mean values revealed interrelationships between HRV measurements.

6. An Exploration of Time Domain Norms for Undergraduates, Marilise Stamps, Truman State University; Jayla Simms; Zack Irvin; Dr. Fredric Shaffer (mentor)

This presentation provides an in-depth analysis of time domain norms for 103 undergraduates (53 men and 50 women) 18 to 26 years of age to aid clinicians and researchers. A Thought Technology ProComp™ Infiniti system monitored ECG, respiration, and accessory SEMG. Active ECG electrodes were placed about 2 inches above the navel and 4 inches to the left and right of the midline and the reference electrode was centered over the angle of the sternum. A respirometer was positioned over the navel to measure abdominal excursion and respiration rate. SEMG active electrodes were placed over the belly of the right trapezius and scalene muscles, with the reference electrode ovthe spine. Participants were stabilized for 5 minutes and then monitored for 5 minutes sitting upright, with eyes open, no feedback, and instructions to breathe normally. Data were artifacted within CardioPro and then detrended in Kubios 3.0 using a smoothness priors procedure. Means, standard deviations, and confidence intervals were calculated for HRV time domain measures (heart rate, HR Max – HR Min, HRV triangular index, NN50, pNN50, RMSSD, SDNN, and TINN). A Principal Components Analysis of the natural logarithm of the mean values revealed interrelationships between HRV measurements.

 

BOS06 Ethical Principles and Practice Standards in Biofeedback and Neurofeedback
Time: 11am-12:30pm
CE Credits: 1.5
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Introductory
Session Focus: 80% Clinical/20% Research
Target Audience: Practitioners in biofeedback and neurofeedback. This workshop provides 1.5 hours of CE needed for licensure in mental health professions.

This session will review legal and ethical responsibilities of biofeedback and neurofeedback practitioners. Biofeedback professionals are governed in clinical practice by state regulations under the relevant licensing act, professional codes of ethics for his or her home profession, and the Professional Standards and Ethical Principles of Biofeedback (9th rev., May 2016) of the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance (BCIA). The workshop will provide an overview of medical ethics and a review of the most recent AAPB/BCIA Professional Standards and Ethical Principles of Biofeedback. The workshop will also review emerging standards on telemedicine for behavioral health and practice standards for neurofeedback. Violation of standards and guidelines, even when unintended, invites the risk of lawsuit, criminal prosecution, financial penalties, loss of licensure, and expensive and stressful legal and administrative reviews.

Learning Objectives:

· Attendees will review and discuss the Professional Standards and Ethical Principles of Biofeedback, published by BCIA, and their interpretation for decisions in biofeedback practice.
· Attendees will explain conflicting jurisdictions of state laws and regulations, professional codes of conduct, BCIA guidelines, and federal regulations.
· Attendees will review and discuss practice standards governing entry level competence, continuing education requirements, and scope of practice.
· Attendees will be informed about guidelines for advertising, marketing, and public statements about Biofeedback and NEUROFEEDBACK.

Speaker(s):

· Donald Moss, BCB, BCN, BCB-HRV, Licensed Psychologist, Dean, College of Integrative Medicine and Health Sciences,, Saybrook University: Donald Moss, Ph.D., BCB, is Dean, College of Integrative Medicine and Health Sciences, at Saybrook University, Oakland, CA.  There he has built training programs in biofeedback, clinical hypnosis, integrative mental health, wellness coaching, and integrative/functional nutrition. Dr. Moss is currently President of the Society for Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis. He is also the ethics chair and international certification chair for the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance.  He has served as president of Division 30 (hypnosis) of the American Psychological Association, and president of the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback (AAPB). He has a new book released with co-editor Fredric Shaffer on Physiological Recording Technology and Applications in Biofeedback and Neurofeedback (AAPB) and a second new book with co-author Angele McGrady on Integrative Pathways: Navigating Chronic Illness with a Mind-Body-Spirit Approach (Springer). He also has a book in press with co-editor Inna Khazan on Mindfulness, Compassion, and Biofeedback Practice (AAPB).

 

BOS07 A Bio-psycho-social Perspective on Trauma
Time: 11am-12:30pm
CE Credits: 1.5
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Introductory
Session Focus: 70% Clinical/30% Research
Target Audience: Any clinician interested in trauma

In this symposium, we will present a broad theoretical approach to the etiology and treatment of trauma related disorders. We start with an evolutionary perspective (presented by Dr. Constance Dalenberg, a noted Trauma researcher and clinician), move to the emotional aspects involving shame and guilt (presented by Dr. Carolyn Allard, incoming president of Dvision 56 in APA) , and conclude with the biology of trauma disorders (presented by Dr. Richard Gevirtz, a noted  heart rate variability biofeedback[HRVB] researcher and clinician). In each case the background information has implications for treatment. In this vein, we try to show that HRVB may potentiate other treatment modalities because it opens up non-verbal pathways involving the autonomic nervous system. Dr Julian Thayer will then tie these threads to the Neurovisceral Theory regulating the Central Autonomic System (CAN).

Learning Objectives:

· Become familiar with the evolutionary perspective on trauma
· Learn how shame and guilt affect the processing of traumatic events
· Learn how incorporting non-verbal interventions such as HRVB can improve treatment outcome
· Learn how the Neuro-visceral Theory can inform understanding and treatment of PTSD

Speaker(s):

· Richard Gevirtz, PhD, BCB, AAPB Honorary Fellow, CSPP@Alliant International University: Dr. Richard Gevirtz is a Distinguished Professor of Psychology at the California School of Professional Psychology at Alliant International University in San Diego. He has been in involved in research and clinical work in applied psychophysiology and biofeedback for the last 30 years and was the president of the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback, 2006-2007. His primary research interests are in understanding the physiological and psychological mediators involved in disorders such as chronic muscle pain, fibromyalgia, and gastrointestinal pain. In this vein, he has studied applications of heart rate variability biofeedback for anxiety, pain, gastrointestinal, cardiac rehabilitation and other disorders.  He is the author of many journal articles and chapters on these topics. He also maintains a part time clinical practice treating patients with anxiety and stress related disorders.

· Constance Dalenberg, PhD, Alliant International University

· Carolyn Allard, PhD, APBB, Alliant International University

· Julian Thayer, PhD, University of California at Irvine: Dr. Julian F. Thayer received his B.A. with Honors from Indiana University and his Ph.D. from New York University in psychophysiology with a minor in quantitative methods. Dr. Thayer has held faculty positions at Penn State University and the University of Missouri. Before moving to the Ohio State University in 2006 as the Ohio Eminent Scholar Professor in Health Psychology, Dr. Thayer was Chief of the Emotions and Quantitative Psychophysiology Section in the Laboratory of Personality and Cognition at the National Institute on Aging. Dr. Thayer is currently Distinguished University Professor of Psychological Science at the University of California, Irvine and the Ohio Eminent Scholar Professor in Health Psychology Emeritus at the Ohio State University. He has published over 400 research papers and book chapters covering a wide range of topics including behavioral medicine, cardiology, emotion, psychopathology, bioengineering, research design and multivariate statistical techniques

 

BOS08 Common Breathing Practice - The Claims and What we Know
Time: 11am-12:30pm
CE Credits: 1.5
Track: Hot Topics
Level: Introductory
Session Focus: 100% Clinical
Target Audience: Anyone who works with optimal performance and those teaching respiratory and HRV biofeedback

More and more people are turning to breathing techniques as a way to promote physical and mental health. According to the 2007 report by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Medicine (NCCIM), deep breathing techniques were ranked as the second most commonly used form of "complementary" and "integrative" health practice (12.7%0), behind natural products (17.5%). Yet many of these individuals do not know about heart rate variability, and may never have heard of vagal tone, hypocapnia, or paced breathing. With the resurgence in popularity of psychedelics, interest and exposure is also growing in Grof's Holotropic breathwork. Furthermore, other forms of forceful, hyperventilation approaches, like Wim Hof, Holorenic breathing, and yogic pranayama techniques are being practiced without clear guidance, understanding or education. On the opposite end of the spectrum, Buteyko breathing, which involves exhaled pauses and breath holding, claiming to increase tolerance to carbon dioxide levels, is also a popular breathing practice. In this presentation, several of these approaches will be discussed, clarified and examined in light of their claims as well as what the current research shows.

Learning Objectives:

· Summarize and describe the components of the various breathing techniques
· Describe the current medical and psychological claims of the various breathing techniques
· Review the current research involved in the various breathing techniques
· Propose potential models of healing that may account for patient improvement

Speaker(s):

· Brad Lichtenstein, Naturopathic Physician, The BreathSPACE / Bastyr University: Brad Lichtenstein, ND BCB BCB-HRV. believes in the power of breath to restore health and balance. As a naturopathic physician in private practice and a professor at Bastyr University for over two decades, Dr. Lichtenstein has helped people embody the lives they want to live. His approach integrates naturopathic medicine, mind-body medicine and biofeedback, depth & somatic psychology, Eastern contemplative practices, yoga and movement, bodywork and end-of-life care. He participated in a joint research study between the University of Washington and Bastyr University where he provided over 500 guided meditations to hospice patients. Dr. Lichtenstein received his doctorate of naturopathic medicine from Bastyr University. His articles have appeared in several publications and journals and he speaks nationally on topics ranging from stress-reduction, mindfulness and health, mind-body approaches to healing trauma, and issues surrounding end-of-life.

 

BOS09 Performance Enhancement Using qEEG Scales - CANCELED DUE TO TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS
Time: 11am-12:30pm
CE Credits

Speaker(s):

· Stuart C. Donaldson, PhD, Director/Myosymmetries

 

Time: 12:30pm-2:00pm
Lunch (On Your Own)

 

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