Wednesday Schedule

 

Wednesday, November 4, 2020


Registration
Time: 7:00 am-7:00 pm

 

Continental Breakfast - Workshop Attendees ONLY
Time: 7:00 am-8:00am

 

WS08 Practical Interventions to Improve Health and Well Being in Adult Learners
Time: 8:00am-12:00pm
CE Credits: 4
Track: Hot Topics
Level: Intermediate
Session Focus: 75% Clinical/25% Research
Target Audience: Psychologists, Physicians, Trainees, Students

The major contemporary chronic physical and emotional illnesses are strongly influenced by the choices that people make, and the actions resulting from those choices. Most of these illnesses are associated with poor quality of life and significant burden of disease. Lifestyle habits develop during the teenage developmental stage and symptoms, such as headache, anxiety and gastrointestinal distress frequently emerge. However, these issues are rarely addressed, until the person demonstrates clinically significant problems later in life. Then, medical and psychiatric resources are expended to treat diagnosed conditions which may have been preventable or modifiable in their earlier stages. The adult learning atmosphere is an ideal environment for students and future health care professionals to increase self-awareness, gain skills to manage subclinical conditions and improve lifestyle habits. The use of social norms and personal feedback will be demonstrated as tools to motivate students to modify their behavior and decrease over reactivity to stress. Building resiliency, the ability to bounce back and to grow through adversity is critical to educational success at the undergraduate and graduate level. Students who are in good health physically and emotionally are able to use their intellectual abilities to the fullest. Similarly, resilient trainees make fewer errors, and are less likely to drop out of the healthcare workforce. The information and case examples which will be presented in this workshop is based on the presenters’ extensive experience in the undergraduate and graduate education environment. We will provide evidence-based models, practical examples and concrete instructions on implementing change strategies to improve lifestyle, decrease symptoms and improve overall well-being in adult learners. Educators/clinicians can implement these practical models in their universities or clinics to provide people with life-long skills to maintain well-being and prevent disease.

Learning Objectives:

· Provide detailed educational health promoting and stress reduction programs that educators/clinicians can implement in their university or clinics
· Describe the structure of a 14 session stress management program for college students
· Provide examples of lifestyle changes that can be accomplished by future healthcare providers in 10 weeks
· Summarize the importance of self-care pro-health practices to prevent illness onset
· Demonstrate applications of student programs to clinical settings

Speaker(s):

·  Angele McGrady, PhD, University of Toledo: Dr. McGrady received her BS from Chestnut Hill College, her Masters in Physiology from Michigan State University, her Ph.D. in Biology and her M. Ed in Counseling from the University of Toledo. She is a licensed counselor, certified by the Biofeedback Certification Institute of America and is a certified sports counselor. Currently Dr. McGrady is a professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Toledo Medical Center (UTMC), where she maintains a practice in counseling and biofeedback. Her professional activities include: Past President of the AAPB and current member of the editorial board of “Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback”. Dr. McGrady has experience in many levels of teaching: medical, nursing, physician assistant, graduate and residency. She has designed wellness programs for medical students, medical residents and college athletes. Her curriculum vita lists 85 peer reviewed articles and book chapters. She and Dr. Donald Moss have co-authored two books. “Pathways to Illness, Pathways to Health” and “Integrative Approaches to Chronic Illness” (2018) were published by Springer. Inc.

·  Erik Peper, PhD, Institute for Holistic Health Studies: Erik Peper, PhD. BCB, is an international authority on biofeedback and self-regulation and since 1971 he has been researching factors that promote healing. He is Professor of Holistic Health Studies / Department of Health Education at San Francisco State University. He is President of the Biofeedback Foundation of Europe and past President of the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback. He has a biofeedback practice at BiofeedbackHealth (www.biofeedbackhealth.org). He is an author of numerous scientific articles and books such as Muscle Biofeedback at the Computer, Make Health Happen, Fighting Cancer-A Nontoxic Approach to Treatment, and Biofeedback Mastery. He publishes the blog, the Peper perspective-ideas on illness, health and well-being (www.peperperspective.com). He is a recognized expert on holistic health, stress management and workplace health. His research interests focus on psychophysiology of healing, illness prevention,, respiratory psychophysiology and optimizing health with biofeedback.

 

WS13 Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback (HRVB): How To Do It, Why it Works, and For What - Part 2
Time: 8:00am-5:30pm* (PLEASE NOTE THIS CONCLUDES AT 5:30PM)
CE Credits: 7.5
Track: Basic Science
Level: Introductory
Session Focus: 50% Clinical/50% Research
Target Audience: Biofeedback/neurofeedback practitioners, psychologists, clinical counselors, clinical social workers, marriage and family therapists, nurses, physicians, and other healthcare professionals and academicians interested in utilizing heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback in their practice or research.

This workshop is designed for biofeedback/neurofeedback practitioners, psychologists, clinical counselors, clinical social workers, marriage and family therapists, nurses, physicians, and other healthcare professionals and academicians interested in utilizing heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback in their practice or research. This workshop will cover 7.5 hours of the BCIA HRV Biofeedback Certificate of Completion Blueprint and will cover cardiac anatomy and physiology, respiratory anatomy and physiology, autonomic nervous system anatomy and physiology, heart rate variability, HRV instrumentation, and HRV measurements. Attendees will review the cardiac, respiratory, and autonomic anatomy and physiology that underlies HRV biofeedback. They will discuss the central role of breathing in diverse disorders like anxiety, hypertension, and chronic pain. Last, they will explain how HRV biofeedback restores autonomic balance and why this is important to health and performance. Attendees will be able to discuss the meaning and sources of HRV, and the correlates of low, normal, and high HRV. The presenters will explain the relationship between aging, disease, and reduced HRV. Attendees will be able explain how to properly use HRV instruments and interpret signals from blood volume pulse, electrocardiogram, and respirometer sensors. The presenters will survey the major artifacts that contaminate recordings from these sensors and show how to prevent or minimize them. Attendees will be able to describe and interpret HRV time and frequency domain measurements.

Learning Objectives:

· Explain the meaning of HRV, sources of HRV, factors that influence HRV, correlates of low and normal HRV, and the benefits of increased HRV.
· Explain the physiological basis of HRV and the blood volume pulse (BVP), electrocardiogram (ECG), and respirometer signals.
· learn how BVP, ECG, and breathing sensors operate, how to perform tracking tests, and how to identify and control artifacts.
· learn BVP and ECG sensor placements with regard to cultural sensitivity.
· learn how to explain HRV time-domain and frequency-domain measurements.

Speaker(s):

· Richard Gevirtz, PhD
· Paul Lehrer, PhD

 

WS14 Neurofield Advanced Course - Part 2
Time: 8:00am-5:00pm
CE Credits: 7
Track
Level: Advanced
Session Focus:
Target Audience: Advanced Practitioners familiar with the Neurofield system.

The NeuroField Neuromodulation Advanced Training is designed to enhance your skills in EEG and QEEG assessment, analysis, map interpretation, neuromodulation and treatment planning in the NeuroField64 software platform, as well as Independent Components Analysis via EEGlab and WinEEG. Case studies are welcome. This training is for intermediate to advanced neurotherapy clinicians.

NeuroField64 combines Pulsed Electro Magnetic Field stimulation (pEMF), transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS), and transcranial random noise stimulation stimulation (tRNS), and transcranial Advanced Pink Noise Stimulation (tAPNS) modalities with both Z-score and Amplitude EEG neurofeedback for the purpose of enhancing treatment effectiveness.

Dr. Dogris and Dr. Thompson will lecture regarding the application of NeuroField64 on various clinical diagnoses including (but not limited to) Autism, ADHD, Mood Disorders, Substance Abuse, Sleep Issues, TBI, and Concussion, as well as Peak Performance. Dr. Dogris and Dr. Thompson will conduct live demonstrations of NeuroField64 and provide participants the opportunity to experience these modalities during the training.

Learning Objectives:

· Attendees should be able to identify different pathologies associated with EEG and QEEG presentations.
· Attendees should be able to administer neuromodulation protocols, such as pEMF, tACS, tDCS, tRNS, and Pink Noise Stimulation
· Attendees should be able to use the neurofield system, including the synchronized application of stimulation and NEUROFEEDBACK.
· Attendees should be able to list the mechanism of action for neurostimulation procedures.

Speaker(s):

· Nicholas Dogris, PhD, QEEG-D, BCN, NeuroField
· Tiff Thompson, PhD, R.EEG.T, BCN, QEEG-D, MFT, NeuroField

 

WS15 Brain Connectivity Assessment and Treatment
Time: 8:00am-5:00pm
CE Credits: 7
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Intermediate
Session Focus: 50% Clinical/50% Research
Target Audience: Professionals interested in QEEG and neurofeedback advanced approaches and are involved in treatment clinical populations.

Over the past several years, we have seen advancements in the ways we assess coherence and connectivity that provide great insights into brain functioning. This understanding has led to approaching coherence in a multivariate fashion that enhances it's accuracy. Multivariate autoregressive statistical tools have become critical to this endeavor. Such techniques enable us to measure effective connectivity in a source localized fashion such that we can now image reciprocal causality and interactions. This accuracy in depicting neural networks gets us closer to the real signals in the brain. This has led to an enhancement in how we do neurofeedback training which now uses four sensors and trains coherence in a multivariate fashion. This workshop will present methods of measuring effective connectivity and conducting multivariate coherence training. We will review the empirical evidence supporting this approach in various clinical populations.

Learning Objectives:

· Define coherence
· Understand multivariate approaches to coherence and connectivity
· Learn about procedures involved in granger causality connectivity analysis
· Learn about 4 channel multivariate coherence training as a neurofeedback modality
· Learn about the empirical efficacy of this approach

Speaker(s):

· Robert Coben, PhD, CoDirector, Integrated Neuroscience Services: Robert Coben, PhD, received his doctoral degree in 1991 and has been a licensed psychologist in the state of New York since 1994 and Arkansas since 2016. He is the Director and Chief Neuropsychologist of NeuroRehabilitation and Neuropsychological Services and CoDIrector of Integrated Neuroscience Services. Dr. Coben is a member in good standing of the American Psychological Association, International Neuropsychological Society, International Society for Neurofeedback and Research, and the American Association of Psychophysiology and Biofeedback. He is an associate editor for the Journal of Neurotherapy and Frontiers in Child Health and Human Development. He is also a editorial reviewer for the following journals: Journal of Neurotherapy, Neuroregulation, Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, Frontiers in Child Health and Human Development, Clinical Neurophysiology, Neuroimage, and Journal of Psychophysiology. He has edited special issues of journals on EEG Connectivity and more recently as a special topic editor for Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. He was the chief editor on two issues on Applied Neuroscience, Neuromodulation and Neurofeedback. These special issues covered topics related to seizures disorders and autism spectrum disorder. He has also edited a book entitled “Neurofeedback and Neuromodulation Techniques and Applications.” His research interests include the study of Neuropsychology and Neurophysiology in the understanding of childhood neurodevelopmental disorders, especially autism, and treatment applications for the same. Dr Coben has served as the President of the International Society for Neurofeedback and Research as well as the President of the International Board of Quantitative Electrophysiology.

· Anne W Stevens, PhD, CoDirector, Integrated Neuroscience Services: Anne Stevens, PhD, received her doctoral degree from the University of Memphis in 1995. She has held a license to practice Psychology in the state of Tennessee and currently is licensed in Arkansas, and has practiced in Fayetteville since 1989. Since 2016, Dr. Stevens has been the President of Integrated Neuropsychological Services, with an expertise in head injury and other disorders related to brain functioning. Her practice encompasses neuropsychological and Quantitative EEG Assessment, as well as treatment, primarily through neurofeedback. She has earned board certification through BCIA in Neurofeedback and the QEEG Certification Board for QEEG Technologist. In addition to her private practice, Dr. Stevens serves on the Scientific Advisory Committee of Neurotopia and the Head Trauma Committee at the University of Arkansas Athletic Department. In 2001, she was also the co-founder of ContreQ, specializing in the assessment and treatment of sport-related concussion. Dr. Stevens is a member of good standing with the American Psychological Association, the National Academy of Neuropsychology and the International Society of Neurofeedback and Research. Additionally, Dr. Stevens also served on the Board of Directors for the International Society of Neurofeedback and Research from 2008 until 2012.

 

WS16 Everything You Need to Know About EEG, but Were Afraid to Ask: Caps, Equipment, Software, Room, Chairside Manner, Reading in the Raw… EEG, Artifacting & Interpretation
Time: 8:00am-5:00pm
CE Credits: 7
Track: Basic Science
Level: Introductory
Session Focus: 70% Clinical/30% Research
Target Audience: This workshop is intended for those interested in getting into full-head EEG recordings and qEEG analysis plus those who have been doing EEG and qEEG, but never had good training or guidance and would like to confirm if one is doing it right. Further insights on how to read a raw EEG is something that everyone can improve on. Also, many examples of the signatures of a variety of clinical conditions will be shown.

Brain waves are a reflection of EVERYTHING in your life. This includes organ function, nutrition, sleep, stress and your moment by moment thoughts. Collecting the best brain activity that you can trust for making good clinical decisions is exceptionally difficult. Unfortunately, the ratio of poor brain maps done in relation to good clinically useable brain maps are likely in the order of 5-1. When observing an abnormal EEG, is that abnormal EEG being caused by a brain issue or nutritional, hormonal, lifestyle issues? Reading the raw EEG is critical to identify dynamic events. Even EMG, the frequency of EMG and the frequency of EMG events are valuable biomarkers. The wrinkling of a forehead or blinking of an eye can be biomarkers for anxiety or theta/paroxysmal bursts, which can easily be observed with the naked eye (no equipment). Making good recordings begins with good equipment and the ability to properly use that equipment. Then there is the ART of artifacting. Bad artifacting easily produces false negatives and positives. A clinical diagnosis is never better than the data it is founded upon. Finally, there is Fourier analysis, breaking out the frequency spectra and network relationships of phase, comodulation and coherence. This workshop is delving into all the nitty-gritty details that are absolutely necessary for making a good recording.

Learning Objectives:

· Learn the importance of selecting a good cap, equipment and software.
· Learn how to set up the room and good chairside manner.
· Learn the basics on how to read the raw EEG and the clinical relevance of artifact.
· Learn about artifacting the EEG.
· Learn about quantitatively processing the data and using databases.

Speaker(s):

· Dave Siever, CET, Mind Alive Inc.: Dave graduated in 1978 as an engineering technologist. He later worked in the Faculty of Dentistry at the University of Alberta designing TMJ Dysfunction related diagnostic equipment and research facilities. He organized research projects, taught basic physiology and the advanced TMJ diagnostics course. Dave had noted anxiety issues in many patients suffering with TMJ dysfunction, prompting him to study biofeedback, which he applied to the patients and then later, Dave designed biofeedback devices. In 1984, Dave designed his first Audio-Visual Entrainment (AVE) device – the “Digital Audio-Visual Integration Device,” or DAVID1. Since this time, through his company, Mind Alive Inc., Dave has been researching and refining AVE technology specifically for use in relaxation, boosting academic and sports performance and treating anxiety, depression, PMS, ADD/ADHD, FMS, SAD, pain, cognitive decline and insomnia, which he presents about primarily at various conferences and for special interest medical/psychology groups. In 2105, Dave made an exciting discovery in identifying a unique type of TBI that is prevalent throughout society and overlooked by the medical community. Surprisingly, he also found that AVE can restart the brain within 20 minutes. Further research has found that AVE generates large amounts of lactate, which in turn fires up both glia and neurons. Dave also designs Cranio-Electro Stimulation (CES) products and is a leading provider of transcranial DC stimulation (tDCS) and devices. As a result of Dave’s commitment to research, Mind Alive Inc. now owns three patents involving neurotechnology. Dave continues to conduct research, perform a quantitative EEG service and designs new products pertaining to enhanced performance and mental wellness.   

· John LeMay, MA, MFT, PhD student at Saybrook University, Oakland CA: John received his Masters degree in 1993 in Marriage and Family Therapy and is the owner of LeMay Counseling and Consulting, LLC., in Nevada. Having good technical ability and a never-ending love of neurophysiology, John co-founded Cerebotix, a research and development institute for the scientific and clinical exploration of the ramifications of the brain-computer interface seeking both basic discoveries and new applications to improve the human mind and to assist humanity’s spiritual journey.    John is working on the Cerebotix robotic interface to establish communication capabilities in autistic children; identification of non-synaptic cerebro-cortical activity in humans and the relationship of this activity to spiritual awareness; interpersonal brain wave effects in couples and their ability to cooperate; impact of induced resonant frequencies on generalized cerebral efficiency and personal growth; impact of 3-dimensional graphical user interfaces on enhanced brain-training systems. John has developed several courses, including those in improving marriage, using biofeedback, qEEG and ERP.    

 

WS17 Working with Screen Dependence, Obsession and Addiction: Effects on Health, Wellness and Development
Time: 8:00am-5:00pm
CE Credits: 7
Track: Hot Topics
Level: Intermediate
Session Focus: 50% Clinical/50% Research
Target Audience: Any primary interventionist: Practicing therapists or medical professionals (e.g., bio & neurofeedback providers, MD's Psychologists).  Any direct secondary interventionist: Nurses, teachers, school counselors etc.

Rethinking Screen Time: Working with Screen Dependence, Obsession and Addiction. An in-depth workshop exploring the primary effects of excessive and otherwise non-complimentary screen/i-tech use on the (developing) brain and behaviour … And what clinicians can do about it! For well over 30 years now we have been assimilating interactive technologies in all aspects of our lives (work, play, parenting and education) without any attention or functional understanding of the potential impact on our health and wellness. Specifically, we did not explore, or otherwise ignored, effects on our biology other than those involved in product development or designed to capitalize on sales and usage patterns. In this in-depth workshop Dr. Mari Swingle will present her ground-breaking research mapping the effects of excessive or otherwise inappropriate usage of technologies on the adult brain and the developing person.  She will explore active clinical data as well as 30+ years of progressive archival data. Participants will look at universal alterations in biological priming & the rewiring or hijacking of biological systems as well as specifics in the socio-emotional and cognitive development of infants (e.g. attachment), children (e.g., vestibular system), adolescents (e.g., psycho-sexual development), youth (e.g., failure to launch) and adults as well as individual liabilities and epigentetic vulnerabilities that are client/person specific. To this end she will discuss variations by exposure patterns relative to chronological age, age of exposure and nature of exposure. Cases will be presented, diagnostic flags and treatment protocols reviewed. All screen (process) addictions including gaming addiction, social media addiction, pornography addiction, scholastic perfectionism and ‘screen workaholism’ are not insular; tending to be culturally or environmentally accepted or supported. They are also often co-morbid or co-occurrent with other expressed pathology or subclinical illness (or otherwise masked metal health issues). Thus Dr. Swingle will also explore major and minor attitudinal hurdles and environmental/cultural obstacles that must be crossed to ensure successful treatment outcome.

Learning Objectives:

· Recognize symptoms of generalised i-addiction (process adddiction) as well as combined content & process adiction (e.g., gaming addiction, sexual/pornography addiction, social media addiction, FOMO, etc.) It is not all bad! Learn to differentiate between i-tech use as healthy and Integrated vs unhealthy Interference which would benefit from intervention.
· Learn and recognize (individual as well as cultural) risk factors (e.g., environmental, relational, epigenetic, etc.)
· Learn various age effects (e.g., variations in severity and treatment success outcomes based upon chronological age vs age of introduction as well as state of emmersion). Learn to identify stages and phases of critical developmental interference (e.g., 0-3, 4-6, 7-9, 9-11, 12-16, & 18+) on the developing brain/person.
· Learn how to reach & teach clients to mitigate societal factors including: Social & scholastic resistance; parental fatigue, apathy and abdication.  How to tell science from hype (e.g., read the fine print of media / PR & pseudo research by vested interest)
· Learn base biological interreference beyond the EEG (e.g., effects on melatonin production, sleep onset insomnia & circadian rhythm, erectile dysfunction, heart rate & blood pressure, etc.) & implications for biofeedback. / Learn how to read the EEG (Clinical Q) as an assessment and promising diagnostic tool

Speaker(s):

· Mari Swingle, PhD Clin Psych, Dr. of Psychology: Dr. Mari Swingle (PhD & MA Clin Psych, MA Ed), practicing (neuro)therapist, researcher, consultant, and author is a BCIA Senior Fellow BCIA, AAPB BOD, and winner of practice and authorship awards including FABBS Early Career Impact Award for her research on technology, the brain, and behavior. She works with a wide range of neurophysiological ailments including Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, OCD’s and Addiction and is well known for her work with children and families experiencing behavioral and learning difficulties (e.g., Defiance and Conduct Disorders, ADHD, Dyslexia, Processing, Written Output, & Speech Disorders and the family dynamics that often come with (e.g., Parental Fatigue, Depression, Anxiety, and Couple/Parental Dynamics). Over the years Dr. Swingle has found that that many symptoms, for which clients seek psychological services, appear to be exacerbated, if not caused by, excessive or otherwise inappropriate applications of interactive technologies (gaming, porn consumption, social media obsession etc.). This has been the primary focus of her clinical research since 2009.

 

WS18 General Introduction to Biofeedback Peripherals
Time: 8:00am-5:00pm
CE Credits: 7
Track: Basic Science
Level: Introductory
Session Focus: 100% Research
Target Audience: Licensed Health Care Professionals

This 1 day workshop is for researchers and health professionals who want to learn how to use peripheral biofeedback technology. The modalities that will be the focus of the session are Surface Electromyography (SEMG), Respiration, Temperature, Skin Conductance, Heart Rate (from blood volume pulse and electrocardiogram), and Heart Rate Variability.  A general overview of the physiological basis for each peripheral measurement will be demonstrated. Participants will participate in a "hands on" demonstration experience using the different modalities in conjunction with audio and visual multimedia biofeedback displays.

Learning Objectives:

· Increase exposure on the key features of the BioGraph Infiniti 6.6 software and hardware.
· Describe software trouble shooting and technical specifications. Software suites include Neurofeedback, Physiology, Rehab-Continence, Rehab- Muscle , HRV, and Reaction Time.
· Demonstrate how to use different sensors including Surface Electromyography (SEMG), Respiration, Temperature, Skin Conductance, Electroencephalography (EEG), Heart Rate and Electrocardiology (EKG) with audio and visual multimedia biofeedback screens, sounds and games.
· Explain what a virtual data-channel is and how it is related to the raw data from the physical sensor.  Describe when proportional and inverse-proportional feedback should be used.  Define what is artifact and why is artifact rejection necessary. Invite “hands-on” practice generating reports, review data, and learn how to modify or customize and excising screen.

Speaker(s):

· Raymond Yust, Training/Show Coordinator, Thought Technology:

· Frank DeGregorio, Technical Support Director ( Software IT Specialist), Thought Technology: Frank DeGregorio has a Diplome d'Etudes Collegiales (DEC) in Computer Science and Networking and a Certificate as a Programming Analyst. He has over 25 years of experience as technical, network, computer and high-level troubleshooting for Thought Technology. In addition, he has over 18 years of experience teaching BioGraph workshops with Lynda Thompson, Ph.D. and had the opportunity to attend a wide variety of workshops held by clinicians such as Dr. Barry Sterman, Dr. Tanju Surmeli, Dr. Don Moss and Dr. Richard Gevirtz, Dr. Erik Peper and Dr. Vietta Sue Wilson. Frank's extensive knowledge of all the product software and hardware offered by Thought Technology gives him the unique ability to take participants from installation of the software to using it effectively.

 

WS19 BCIA Biofeedback Certification Exam Review
Time: 8:00am-12:00pm
CE Credits: 4
Track: Basic Science
Level: Introductory
Session Focus: 50% Clinical/50% Research
Target Audience: Professionals who want to add biofeedback to their practice, preparing for the BCIA Biofeedback certification exam, or who want a comprehensive review of their knowledge.

This workshop will provide an overview of the BCIA Biofeedback certification exam and how to study for it. A multidisciplinary faculty will provide a targeted review of key knowledge areas assessed by the exam, including ethics, efficacy, research, stress, learning theory, the physiological basis of biofeedback signals, safety, instrumentation, and normal values. This workshop is designed to increase attendee confidence as they prepare for the BCIA exam, provide focused review resources, and help them consolidate their learning.

Learning Objectives:

· learn how to describe how biofeedback sensors work, how to identify and prevent artifacts, and how to mitigate infection transmission.
· learn how to ethically deliver biofeedback services.
· learn how to evaluate when physiological measurements are normal and out-of-range.

Speaker(s):

· Fredric Shaffer

· Donald Moss, PhD, Saybrook University: Donald Moss, PhD, BCB, is Dean, College of Integrative Medicine and Health Sciences, at Saybrook University, Oakland, CA. There he has built training programs in biofeedback, clinical hypnosis, integrative mental health, wellness coaching, and integrative/functional nutrition. Dr. Moss is the Education Chair of the Society for Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis (SCEH). He is also the ethics chair and international certification chair for the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance. He has served as president of Division 30 (hypnosis) of the American Psychological Association, SCEH, and the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback (AAPB).

· Inna Khazan

· Judy, Crawford

 

WS20 Group Biofeedback: What, Where, Why, and How Does It Work?
Time: 8:00am-12:00pm
CE Credits: 4
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Intermediate
Session Focus: 85%Clinicla/15% Research
Target Audience: Practitioners who want to advance their practice and have an interest in implementing group-based biofeedback services.

In many clinical settings, there is a push to increase access and optimize costs, which has led to the development and implementation of more group-based interventions. With the appropriate considerations, biofeedback can be effectively utilized in a group setting. Growing evidence suggests that group biofeedback (GBF) demonstrates efficacy in a variety of clinical and non-clinical populations, and can be used in conjunction with other clinical interventions.  However, this modality is not commonly utilized by biofeedback practitioners. In addition to more general barriers to implementing group treatment, obstacles specific to GBF may pertain to equipment issues, support staffing, or uncertainty about how to administer biofeedback in a group. Notably, the potential benefits are numerous, and include cost-effectiveness, improved patient access, and additive benefits specific to group-based treatment. The goal of this workshop is for biofeedback providers to have a theoretical and practical framework to allow for the implementation and practice of GBF for diverse populations. This workshop will provide a background on the applications of and empirical support for GBF, consider some of the special considerations for implementing this intervention, and discuss specifics of how to offer GBF in conjunction with other evidence-based treatment modalities such as mindfulness and cognitive-behavioral therapy. To make this intervention more accessible, a protocol and a variety of different ways to implement this modality will be offered.

Learning Objectives:

· Describe current level of evidence to support the use of group biofeedback in various patient populations
· Discuss ethical concerns raised by seeing patients in groups and how to address
· Explore strategies to manage common challenges in group treatment, particularly as they pertain to group biofeedback
· Delineate benefits and limitations of group services compared to individual services
· Practice and/or observe group facilitation skills to simulate a group biofeedback session

Speaker(s):

· Anu Kotay, PhD, Kaiser Permanente San Francisco: Anu Kotay is clinical health psychologist with advanced training in mindfulness, hypnotherapy, and biofeedback. She has been certified as a biofeedback provider since 2004 and is currently the Biofeedback Lead- Behavioral Health Manager at Kaiser Permanente's San Francisco Chronic Pain Management department. She has published in peer-reviewed journals and presented nationally on psychophysiological treatments of chronic medical conditions.

· Carolyn Fisher, PhD, BCB, Psychologist, Cleveland Clinic Foundation: Dr. Carolyn Fisher is a staff health psychologist at the Cleveland Clinic. She obtained her doctorate in health psychology from the University of Cincinnati, and did a 2-year postdoctoral fellowship in general health psychology with a focus on biofeedback at the Cleveland Clinic. One of Dr. Fisher’s specialty areas includes providing biofeedback services to a variety of medial populations, primarily cardiovascular disease and POTS. She has started to offer group-based biofeedback services for patients with POTS in a research setting. She is also interested in the applications of biofeedback for more general mental health populations, and the integration of biofeedback and mindfulness. Dr. Fisher is hoping to add to the evidence base for group biofeedback as an efficacious treatment in a variety of emerging areas, including heart failure, POTS, and obesity.

 

WS21 The Electrophysiology of Stress: Strategies to Improve Clinical Efficacy and Compassion
Time: 8:00am-12:00pm
CE Credits: 4
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Introductory
Session Focus: 80% Clinical/20% Research
Target Audience: Clinicians including psychologists, counselors, nurses, medical providers and integrative practitioners

Compassion has emerged as a major factor in the therapeutic benefit of mindfulness-based techniques which have been integrated into mainstream healthcare. There is a growing body of evidence of the effects of compassion training on physiological, psychological and behavioral levels. Combining biofeedback with compassion practices can maximize the advantageous psychological and physical changes that are seen with both. Research findings suggest that compassion training may decrease loneliness, depressive symptoms, and sleep difficulty as well as moderate the effects of trauma.    This workshop will combine the expertise of two experienced clinical educators to create a unique set of insights into the relationships between not just therapists and their clients, but also the how the stress of daily life can impact the ability of counselors to attend to their own well-being. A clinician’s capacity to sustain a safe and ethical space in which clients can reach therapeutic goals is directly affected by their own levels of energy, health, attention and cognitive clarity. This session will review how to identify the cognitive and physiological symptoms of stress, how to address them through the framework of compassion, and introduce stress management strategies for more effectively educating and supporting clients, as well as reducing compassion fatigue and burnout in clinicians. Key topics will include biofeedback, neurofeedback, meditation, compassionate care, and clinician wellness. Attendees will leave with strategies that can be immediately applied to daily routines to reduce stress and to demonstrate and address self-care for the practitioner, we will practice compassion cultivation during the session.

Learning Objectives:

· Participants will be able to define compassion as used in clinical practice and provide two examples of potential benefits for clients.
· Participants will be able to identify 2 activities used for incorporating concepts of compassion into individual and group therapy treatment to improve mental health and lessening the impact of toxic states of mind on physical disease.
· Participants will be able to identify two common complaints or symptoms that may be addressed with the application of compassion-based practice in treatment.
· Participants will learn introductory concepts regarding how electrophysiology and emotional regulation are connected, and basic strategies for reducing unwanted stress behaviors.
· Participants will be able to identify at least two physiological habits that interfere with emotional and physiological regulation.

Speaker(s):

· Urszula Klich, PhD, My Mindful Way of Life, LLC: Dr. Urszula Klich is a clinical psychologist, speaker, and author who teaches self-regulation to maximize physical and emotional health. She is a certified meditation teacher in Cognitively-Based Compassion Training (CBCT) through Emory University and has served on various medical teams. She is board certified in biofeedback and is the president of the Southeast Biofeedback and Clinical Neuroscience Association. Her specialized program of Mindfulness-Based Biofeedback (MBB) has been published and widely applied from hospitals to classrooms based on the premise that integrating mindfulness and compassion-informed treatment with psychology fosters individuals’ healing power to improve physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being. Living mindfully is advantageous and accessible to anyone who recognizes a need for a shift in their life and sets an intention to move forward. She is a sought-after workshop leader and internationally recognized speaker in health and wellness.

· Penijean Gracefire, MA, BCN, qEEG-D, BrainStar Innovations, LLC: Penijean is a neural frequency analyst and published author who rides motorcycles, drinks tea, and designs therapeutic interventions using 3D brain imaging technology. As a licensed mental health clinician, she integrates emotional experience with electrophysiology to alter neural dynamics in real-time, helping people recover from trauma or improve brain flexibility and resiliency. Penijean’s groundbreaking work has led to industry-wide changes in neurotherapy, and is the basis for current standards in international certification. She currently co-chairs the Neuroscience Task Force for the American Mental Health Counseling Association and serves as a consultant to a number of research and development ventures in the field of neurotechnology.

 

Lunch Break - ON YOUR OWN
Time: 12:00pm - 1:00pm

 

WS22 BCIA Neurofeedback Certification Exam Review - CANCELED DUE TO SPEAKER TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS
Time: 1:00pm to 5:00pm
CE Credits

Speaker(s):

· Michael Thompson, MD, ADD Centre

· Lynda Thompson, PhD, ADD Centre

 

WS23 Focus on Breathing: Capnography and EMG-based Breathing Biofeedback
Time: 1:00pm to 5:00pm
CE Credits: 4
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Introductory
Session Focus: 70% Clinical/30% Research
Target Audience: Anyone interested in expanding their knowledge of breathing biofeedback

Healthy breathing is fundamental to health and well-being. Overbreathing, a common dysregulation of breathing, affects 10-25% of the US population and, if habitual, is associated with conditions such as asthma, panic disorder, anxiety, chest pain, GI distress, and chronic pain. Oftentimes, our clients report to us that the “deep breathing exercises” they’ve learned make them feel lightheaded, short of breath, and/or more anxious. Such symptoms indicate overbreathing (hyperventilation), a practice that quickly reduces carbon dioxide in the blood (hypocapnia). This can lead to emotional, cognitive, behavioral and physiological changes that may seriously impact health and performance. In addition, over-using neck and upper chest muscles for breathing can lead to chronic neck pain and headaches. In this workshop we will review some common breathing-related problems and discuss their underlying psychology, physiology, and assessment techniques. We will provide demonstrations and practical experience in using capnography (feedback of exhaled CO2 level) and EMG biofeedback to correct breathing dysregulation.

Learning Objectives:

· Discuss the concept of overbreathing and its physiological correlates
· Identify overbreathing when present in clients
· Demonstrate ways to monitor breathing and identify dysfunctional breathing using EMG sensors
· Select appropriate skills to correct overbreathing

Speaker(s):

· Inna Khazan, PhD, BCB, Harvard Medical School: Inna Khazan, PhD, BCB is a faculty member at Harvard Medical School and a clinical psychologist specializing in health psychology and performance excellence training using biofeedback and mindfulness-based approaches. Dr. Khazan is recognized as a pioneer in the area of mindfulness-based biofeedback. She teaches nationally and internationally, including at institutions such as the US Navy Special Warfare, US Army Special Forces, and the Stuttgart Opera and Ballet Company. Dr. Khazan is a member of the board of directors for the Institute for Meditation and Psychotherapy (IMP), Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback (AAPB), and Biofeedback Certification International Alliance (BCIA), where she is currently chair elect. Dr. Khazan is the author of numerous journal articles and 2 books: Clinical Handbook of Biofeedback: A Step-by-Step Guide to Training and Practice with Mindfulness and Biofeedback and Mindfulness in Everyday Life: practical solutions for improving your health and performance.

· Christopher Gilbert, PhD, BCB, Osher Center for Integrative Medicine (University of California, San Francisco): Chris Gilbert is a CA-licensed psychologist with the Osher Center for Integrative Medicine (UCSF) where he provides biofeedback services for a variety of problems, including anxiety, somatization, chronic pain, headache, stress, and psychophysiological disorders. He has worked for many years with breathing disorders using various biofeedback modalities. Publications include co-authorship of Multidisciplinary Approaches to Breathing Pattern Disorders, Recognizing and Treating Breathing Disorders, and several book chapters and articles on aspects of breathing regulation as well as biofeedback.

· Fredric Shaffer, PhD, BCB, Truman State University: Fredric Shaffer, PhD, BCB is a biological psychologist and professor of Psychology and former Department Chair at Truman State University, where he has taught since 1975 and has served as Director of Truman’s Center for Applied Psychophysiology since 1977. In 2008, he received the Walker and Doris Allen Fellowship for Faculty Excellence. In 2013, he received the Truman State University Outstanding Research Mentor of the Year award. Dr. Shaffer was the principal co-editor of Evidence-Based Practice in Biofeedback and Neurofeedback (3rd ed.) and authored 12 of its chapters. He was a co-editor with Donald Moss of Foundations of Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback: A Book of Readings. He co-authored with Mark S. Schwartz a chapter on entering the field and assuring competence in Biofeedback: A Practitioner's Guide (4th ed.). He co-authored with Donald Moss, a chapter on biofeedback in the Textbook of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (2nd ed.). He co-authored with Rollin McCraty and Christopher Zerr, the Frontiers in Psychology review article "A healthy heart is not a metronome: An integrative review of the heart's anatomy and heart rate variability." He is a contributing editor for the journal Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback. He is a BCIA-accredited educator for Biofeedback, HRV Biofeedback, Human Physiology, Physiological Psychology, and Psychopharmacology. His current research focuses on techniques to increase heart rate variability. Dr. Shaffer is a BCIA Senior Diplomate in Biofeedback.

 

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