2020 Virtual PROGRAM OF EVENTS - Dec 9

*Sessions subject to change

Wednesday, December 9

Time: 11:00 AM Eastern/10:00 AM Central/9:00 AM Mountain/ 8:00 AM Pacific

Meditation Session

Duration: 30 minutes                   CE Credits: 0

 

Time: 11:30 - 12:30 PM Eastern/10:30 - 11:30  AM Central/9:30 - 10:30 AM Mountain/ 8:30  - 9:30 AM Pacific

KEYNOTE ADDRESS: Whither Happiness? When, How, and Why Might Positive Activities Boost vs. Undermine Well-Being

Presented by: Sonja Lyubomirsky, PhD

Duration: 60 minutes                   CE Credits: 1

Track: Basic Science

Level: INTRODUCTORY: Content is designed for psychologists who may have little to no background in a specialized skill or content area.  Through this level of programming, the learner can become acquainted with the theoretical underpinnings, principles, methods, and perspectives of a content area. An introductory level program also may serve as the foundation for subsequent intermediate and advanced learning. Introductory level programming may also be related to an emerging area of knowledge or practice. Although this content can be used as a foundation for more advanced learning, an introductory level program may simply focus on breadth, enrichment or general knowledge.

Focus: 50% Clinical/50% Research

Target Audience: All

Session Description: Happiness not only feels good; it is good. Happy people have more stable marriages, superior health, and higher incomes. Fortunately, experiments have shown that people can intentionally increase their happiness. In this presentation, I will describe my work on the “how” of happiness — that is, when and why such practices as gratitude or kindness work “best,” and how small and simple activities can transform people into happier and more flourishing individuals. I will introduce the positive activity model (Lyubomirsky & Layous, 2013), which describes when and why positive activities are more (or less) successful at boosting well-being, and propose several ways by which engaging in presumably happiness-increasing activities may actually backfire.

PRESENTER BIO(s): Sonja Lyubomirsky (AB Harvard, summa cum laude; PhD Stanford) is Distinguished Professor and Vice Chair of Psychology at the University of California, Riverside and author of The How of Happiness and The Myths of Happiness, published in 36 countries. Lyubomirsky’s research focuses on the benefits of happiness, why some people are happier than others, and how happiness can be durably increased. Her work have received many grants and honors, including the Diener Award for Outstanding Midcareer Contributions in Personality Psychology, the Distinguished Research Lecturer Award, a Templeton Positive Psychology Prize, and the Faculty of the Year award (twice). She has four kids, ages 6 to 20, and lives in Santa Monica, California.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will describe one empirical research example showing how the experience of frequent positive emotions benefits relationships, work, and health.
  • Participants will list three intentional activities that have been shown to increase happiness, and describe at least one study that supports the efficacy of each of these three activities.
  • Participants will list three factors that moderate (or impact) the success of activities aimed at increasing happiness.
  • Participants will identify one empirical research example of how positive activities improve not only happiness but other areas of life.

 

Time: 1:00 - 2:00 PM Eastern/12:00 - 1:00 PM Central/11:00 - 12:00 PM Mountain/ 10:00 - 11:00 AM Pacific

VL02: Practical Steps to Improve Sleep During a Zombie Apocalypse

Presented by: Fredric Bruce Shaffer, PhD, BCB, BCB-HRV

Duration: 60 minutes                   CE Credits: 1

Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance

Level: INTRODUCTORY: Content is designed for psychologists who may have little to no background in a specialized skill or content area.  Through this level of programming, the learner can become acquainted with the theoretical underpinnings, principles, methods, and perspectives of a content area. An introductory level program also may serve as the foundation for subsequent intermediate and advanced learning. Introductory level programming may also be related to an emerging area of knowledge or practice. Although this content can be used as a foundation for more advanced learning, an introductory level program may simply focus on breadth, enrichment or general knowledge.

Focus: 50% Clinical/50% Research

Target Audience: Clinicians and optimal performance professionals who train clients impacted by insomnia and sleep deprivation.

Session Description: This session will review the latest findings from neuroscience of sleep and their implications for biofeedback and neurofeedback practice. We will review the limitations and dangers of sleep medications, simple behavioral interventions to improve sleep, and the efficacy of biofeedback and neurofeedback for insomnia.

PRESENTER BIO(s): Fredric Shaffer, PhD, BCB, BCB-HRV, is a Biological Psychologist and professor of Psychology at Truman State University where he has taught since 1975. Dr. Shaffer is a veteran instructor and consultant in Physiological Psychology and Psychopharmacology. In 2008, he received the Walker and Doris Allen Fellowship for Faculty Excellence. In 2019, Dr. Shaffer received AAPB's Distinguished Scientist award. He was the principal co-editor of Evidence-Based Practice in Biofeedback and Neurofeedback (3rd ed.) and authored 12 of its chapters.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to explain the functions of sleep and consequences of sleep deprivation.
  • Participants will be able to discuss the limitations and dangers of over-the-counter and prescription sleep medication.
  • Participants will be able to describe simple behavioral interventions to improve sleep.
  • Participants will be able to evaluate the efficacy of Biofeedback and Neurofeedback in insomnia.

 

Time: 2:30 - 3:30 PM Eastern/1:30 - 2:30 PM Central/12:30 - 1:30 PM Mountain/ 11:30 - 12:30 PM Pacific

BOS39: Pediatric EEGs: Neurobiological Development and the Impact and Treatment of Trauma

Presented by: Tiff Thompson, PhD, R.EEG.T, BCN, QEEG-D, MFT

Duration: 60 minutes                   CE Credits: 1

Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance

Level: INTRODUCTORY: Content is designed for psychologists who may have little to no background in a specialized skill or content area.  Through this level of programming, the learner can become acquainted with the theoretical underpinnings, principles, methods, and perspectives of a content area. An introductory level program also may serve as the foundation for subsequent intermediate and advanced learning. Introductory level programming may also be related to an emerging area of knowledge or practice. Although this content can be used as a foundation for more advanced learning, an introductory level program may simply focus on breadth, enrichment or general knowledge.

Focus:

Target Audience: All neurotherapists and students should attend

Session Description: This talk looks at neurobiological development and EEG in instances of abuse and neglect, relative to healthy upbringing. Both nature and nurture, or lack thereof, create the human brain as it evolves through early life. From an evolutionary perspective, the reptilian brain is fully functional at birth and the second layer—the limbic system—is prepared for the organizational experiences of early life. While the neuronal development of the brain’s first and second layers are virtually complete at birth; soon after birth “wiring” (the branching of dendrites) and creation of oligodendrocytes (myelination) begins to occur from the limbic structures into the cortex. It is this third layer that allows for self-conscious awareness, among other qualities. Most of our significant early emotional and intellectual experiences, those that shape our later perceptions and reactions, occur when the limbic and reptilian structures are in dominance. Thus, many of our social-emotional reactions and behaviors are literally programmed beneath the surface of our consciousness.

PRESENTER BIO(s): Tiff Thompson is a board certified neurotherapist, licensed psychotherapist, and Quantitative EEG Diplomate who owns and runs a neurotherapy clinic in Santa Barbara. She is a Registered EEG Technician, a medical credential bestowed by the American Society of Neurodiagnostic Technicians; she has worked in neurology clinics, as well as clinical settings, and has taught in kindergarten to university settings. Tiff has served as the Executive Director of the Western Association of Biofeedback and Neuroscience. She holds two Masters degrees, one in Depth Counseling Psychology and another in Rhetoric. She has a PhD in Psychology; her dissertation was on the intersection of psychodynamic psychology model of the psyche and electroencephalography (EEG). She teaches neuromodulation and neurofeedback courses nationally and internationally for NeuroField, Inc. with her husband, Nicholas Dogris. She also organizes and hosts an annual conference for Neurofield n Santa Barbara for NeuroField users. She is in the process of finalizing an online educational platform: The School of Neurotherapy, which will run three separate curricula: QEEG Didactic training, BCIA Didactic training, and NeuroField Education. Tiff regularly delivers public and trade organization lectures on Quantitative EEGs, the psychodynamics of EEG, neurotherapy, and induced meditative states at various organizations.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees should be able to: list the physiological developmental changes in the brain the correspond with development in utero
  • Attendees should be able to: describe the process of alpha peak frequency speeding up with developmental age
  • Attendees should be able to: describe the changes in the brain caused by environmental stress.

 

Time: 4 - 5:30 PM Eastern/3:00PM -4:30 PM Central/2:00pm -3:30 PM Mountain/ 1:00PM - 2:30 PM Pacific

BOS30: The Myths and Misconceptions of Heart Rate Variability

Presented by: Inna Khazan, PhD, BCB; Brad Lichtenstein, ND, BCB; Richard Gevirtz, PhD

Duration: 90 minutes                   CE Credits: 1.5

Track: Hot Topics

Level: INTERMEDIATE: Content builds upon the learner's foundational knowledge, familiarity with the literature and/or experience in a content area. Programming at this level includes more depth than at a beginning level program. It could also serve as a refresher course for individuals who have background in a content area and are interested in learning more contemporary applications.

Focus: 50% Clinical/50% Research

Target Audience: Anyone who is interested in gaining a deeper understanding of heart rate variability and hear rate variability biofeedback.

Session Description: Heart rate variability is powerful indicator of the body’s ability to self-regulate. Heart rate variability biofeedback has been empirically shown to be an effective intervention for a variety of psychophysiological disorders, such as anxiety, chronic pain, hypertension, and depression. However, heart rate variability is a complicated concept, oftentimes not understood deeply enough by practitioners. This makes heart rate variability biofeedback difficult to explain to patients and, even more importantly, conduct properly with effective results. The purpose of this symposium is to describe and address the most common misconceptions about heart rate variability and heart rate variability biofeedback, providing participants with deeper understanding of the concept and the biofeedback technique.

PRESENTER BIO(s): Inna Khazan, PhD, BCB is a faculty member at Harvard Medical School and a clinical psychologist specializing in health psychology and performance excellence training using biofeedback and mindfulness-based approaches. Dr. Khazan is recognized as a pioneer in the area of mindfulness-based biofeedback. She teaches nationally and internationally, including at institutions such as the US Navy Special Warfare, US Army Special Forces, and the Stuttgart Opera and Ballet Company. Dr. Khazan is a member of the board of directors for the Institute for Meditation and Psychotherapy (IMP), Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback (AAPB), and Biofeedback Certification International Alliance (BCIA), where she is currently chair elect. Dr. Khazan is the author of numerous journal articles and 2 books: Clinical Handbook of Biofeedback: A Step-by-Step Guide to Training and Practice with Mindfulness and Biofeedback and Mindfulness in Everyday Life: practical solutions for improving your health and performance.

Brad Lichtenstein, ND BCB BCB-HRV. believes in the power of breath to restore health and balance. As a naturopathic physician in private practice and a professor at Bastyr University for over two decades, Dr. Lichtenstein has helped people embody the lives they want to live. His approach integrates naturopathic medicine, mind-body medicine and biofeedback, depth & somatic psychology, Eastern contemplative practices, yoga and movement, bodywork and end-of-life care. He participated in a joint research study between the University of Washington and Bastyr University where he provided over 500 guided meditations to hospice patients. Dr. Lichtenstein received his doctorate of naturopathic medicine from Bastyr University. His articles have appeared in several publications and journals and he speaks nationally on topics ranging from stress-reduction, mindfulness and health, mind-body approaches to healing trauma, and issues surrounding end-of-life.

Dr. Richard Gevirtz is a Distinguished Professor of Psychology at the California School of Professional Psychology at Alliant International University in San Diego. He has been in involved in research and clinical work in applied psychophysiology and biofeedback for the last 30 years and was the president of the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback, 2006-2007. His primary research interests are in understanding the physiological and psychological mediators involved in disorders such as chronic muscle pain, fibromyalgia, and gastrointestinal pain. In this vein, he has studied applications of heart rate variability biofeedback for anxiety, pain, gastrointestinal, cardiac rehabilitation and other disorders.  He is the author of many journal articles and chapters on these topics. He also maintains a part time clinical practice treating patients with anxiety and stress related disorders.

Learning Objectives:

  • Define the concept of heart rate variability
  • Describe the most common ways to measure heart rate variability and ways to track progress in heart rate variability biofeedback
  • Explain resonance frequency breathing
  • Differentiate between measurements used at baseline and training phases of heart rate variability biofeedback
  • Explain the difference between clinical and sport use of HRV

 

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