Saturday Schedule

Saturday, March 16
 

6:30pm-7:30pm
 

Yoga/Meditation

7:00am-8:00am
 

Continental Breakfast in Expo Hall
 

7:00am-2:00pm
 

Exhibits Open
 

7:00am-6:30pm
 

Registration

8:00am-9:00am
 

ORAL4 Presentations – Four 15 Minute Presentations
 

CEUs: 1

Stress Management for Freshmen: Personality Dimensions and Relaxation Methods

Level: Introductory
Focus: Clinical and Research
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Who should attend: Teachers and practitioners of stress management methods.

Speakers:
Dr. Paul Lehrer, PhD, Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

Various stress management methods were taught and personality dimensions measured in a Freshman course on the Biology of Stress Management. Students were taught progressive muscle relaxation, autogenic training, mindfulness, hypnosis, cognitive restructuring, and heart rate variability biofeedback. We measured life stressors, hypnotizability, defensiveness, coping strategies, and daily stress before and after daily home relaxation practice.     With normal distributions, life stress scores tended to be high (Mode=600), with average hypnotizability on the Stanford Clinical Scale, and average defensiveness (mode=13.5 on the Crowne Marlowe scale). Daily stress decreased significantly after practicing all relaxation methods. In preference ratings, progressive relaxation was highest and autogenic training lowest, but the distribution was wide. Hypnotically susceptible students gave higher ratings to hypnosis and autogenic training than did others. Although there were no significant changes over weeks in pre-relaxation differences in daily stress or bad vs. good coping methods, having more bad coping methods was associated with greater pre-relaxation stress, defensiveness was significantly correlated (r=.63) with decreases in pre-relaxation stress, pre-post relaxation changes during hypnosis practice were significantly correlated with hypnotizability (r = .52). Number of life stressors was positively correlated with improvement in pre-relaxation tension ratings (r - .53) and with pre-relaxation tension ratings (r = .57), number of stress symptoms (r = .56), and greater proportion of bad to good coping strategies (r = .47).     We concluded that there are 'different strokes for different folks', and that  the most effective stress management methods will differ among people, that people with a lot of life stressors might particularly benefit from learning these methods, and that all methods had beneficial effects.

Learning Objectives:

  • Know the relative preferences among relaxation techniques in a class of college freshmen
  • Know the relationship between number life stressors andamount of stress symptoms
  • Know the relationship between number of stress symptoms and response to stress management methods
  • Know how hypnotizability, defensiveness, and having bad vs good coping strategies relates to stress and response to coping strategies

Burnout and Resiliency in 5 Medical Specialties

Level: Intermediate
Focus: Research
Track: Hot Topics
Who should attend: Psychologists, Physicians, Trainees, Students

Speakers:
Dr. Angele McGrady, PhD, University of Toledo
Dr. Julie Brennan, University of Toledo
Dr. Amy Riese, MD, University of Toledo

Reports of burnout in medical residents has drawn the attention of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and decreased personal accomplishment) has consequences for residents’ health and negatively affects performance. In contrast, resiliency is less studied and programs designed to build this characteristic in residents are sparse. The purpose of this study was to compare measures of burnout and resiliency across specialties. Methods: The protocol was approved by the IRB, and all participants signed the consent form. 121 residents completed these inventories: MBI (Maslach burnout inventory), PQOL (professional quality of life), perceived stress, resiliency and mindfulness. There were 43 women and 77 men of average age 30.4 (4.4) years. Residents completed the assessments in the early fall prior to the beginning of a resiliency intervention program. Data was analyzed by multivariate ANOVA. Results: Comparison of the dependent variables by gender showed that men scored higher on depersonalization and mindfulness and lower on perceived stress. Comparison of the dependent variables among the residents from different programs showed: (1) PQOL: psychiatry, family medicine, neurology residents were higher in compassion satisfaction than internal medicine (p < 0.0001). Family medicine residents scored higher than internal medicine, emergency medicine and psychiatry in secondary traumatic stress. Burnout was lowest in psychiatry residents compared to all others. (2): MBI: residents from internal medicine and emergency medicine scored higher than psychiatry and neurology in emotional exhaustion. Emergency medicine residents scored higher than all other residents in depersonalization (0.0001). There were no differences among residents in perceived stress, resiliency or mindfulness. Conclusion: Residents from different programs have higher or lower rates of burnout, and professional quality of life. Faculty charged with developing programs aimed at increasing resiliency and decreasing burnout need to adapt to specific needs of residents in different disciplines.

Learning Objectives:

  • Define burnout and resiliency
  • Discuss the differences in burnout rates in 5 different medical specialties
  • Apply the results from the screening of medical residents to design of programs to build resilience

Integrating Mindfulness and Biofeedback for Optimal Performance: The B.E.S.T. Approach

Level: Introductory
Focus: Clinical
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Who should attend: Any practitioners interested in optimal performance.

Speakers:
Dr. Margaret Dupee, PhD, BCB, CPO, Psychophysiologist

The sport psychology literature suggests that two of the key aspects of optimal performance include self-awareness and self-regulation (Anderson, 2014). Further to this, research utilizing bio-neurofeedback training has shown that this form of intervention can enhance one’s self-awareness and self-regulation abilities (Dupee et al., 2016).  Alternatively, there is compelling evidence that meditative practices can significantly influence cognitive and emotional processes with various benefits on physical and mental health (Soler et al., 2014). Specifically, Tang et al. (2015) identified three core mechanisms of mindfulness meditation that interact closely to constitute a process of enhanced self-regulation. These include awareness, emotion regulation and. attention control/regulation.    Monterio & Musten’s (2014) second-generation mindfulness-based intervention identifies four essential elements for developing mindfulness. These four elements are awareness of the body, emotions, sensations, and thoughts (B.E.S.T.), which are all anchored through the awareness of the individual’s breath. The integration of bio-neurofeedback techniques to enhance awareness and self-regulation of one’s body, emotions, sensations, and thoughts during mindfulness meditation exercises provides an innovative approach to assist those seeking to learn to perform to their potential more consistently.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the key components of optimal performance
  • Recognize the similarities between mindfulness and biofeedback with respect to optimal performance
  • Summarize the B.E.S.T. approach to mindfulness
  • Explain how biofeedback training can be utilized to enhance awareness of the body, emotions, sensations, and thoughts during mindfulness meditation exercises

Randomized Trial of Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback for Improved Cognitive Function

Level: Intermediate
Focus: Clinical and Research
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Who should attend: Physicians, research scientists, clinical HRV biofeedback specialists, and students.

Speakers:
Mr. James Winstead, MPAS, APA-C, RN

Over-modulation of the sympathetic nervous system and reduced heart rate variability (HRV) are commonly overlooked components of poor cognition, which includes decreased attention, recall, and cognitive processing. HRV biofeedback (HRVB) training induces HRV coherence to balance the autonomic system. Paced breathing (~6 breaths/minute) increases HRV coherence.   This randomized, sham-controlled intervention trial will test the hypothesis that HRVB can improve HRV coherence and cognitive function. Patients are randomized to previously established HRVB or sham protocols (n=40 each, total planned enrollment N=80). Each participant completes a baseline assessment, 6 weekly training sessions, a post-training assessment, a booster training session and assessment (1-month post-training), and a follow-up assessment (2-months post-training). Outcomes include: 15-minutes resting HRV recordings (HRV Coherence Ratio), Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised (HVLT-R), Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT), and Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT). To date, 68 patients completed their baseline assessment, 45 completed the post-training assessment, and 37 completed the entire protocol. In preliminary analyses (all p’s two-tailed), patients in the HRVB group had elevated HRV Coherence Ratios at post-training assessment relative to baseline (0.27±0.27 vs 0.77±0.94, respectively, n=23 p<0.001), whereas no differences were observed among controls (0.22±0.18 vs 0.21±0.18, n=22, p=0.83). Among all participants at baseline (pre-HRVB training) log HRV Coherence Ratios were modestly correlated with mean PASAT (r=0.22, p=0.07) and median reaction time PVT (r=0.22, p=0.06), and negatively correlated with number of PVT lapses (r= -0.25, p=0.05). Furthermore, PVT lapses were negatively correlated with PASAT (r= -0.27, p=0.03). Non-pharmacological therapies that improve cognition would benefit Veterans. Preliminary results indicate that participants with naturally high HRV Coherence Ratios before HRVB training had better sustained attention and more response inhibition, indicated by higher working memory performance on PASAT with greater reaction time and fewer lapses on PVT. HRVB is a valid, quantifiable, easily-implemented intervention. Results from mixed effects statistical models testing study hypotheses concerning cognitive tests will be presented at the meeting.

Learning Objectives:

  • Summarize the role of reduced HRV as an indicator or overall cognitive scores
  • Recognize the relationship between resonant frequency breathing and HRV coherence
  • Apply the role of HRV coherence as an indicator of balanced autonomic activity

 

BOS17 Building Resilience and Happiness through Self-Regulation: A Compassionate Approach to Mind Mood and Pain - CANCELLED DUE TO SPEAKER CANCELLATION

 

BOS18 Old Wine in New Bottles: How Mindfullness, Walk-Talk Therapy and Progressive Relaxation Intersect
 

CEUs: 1                                          
Track: Hot Topics
Level: Intermediate
Focus: Clinical
Who should attend: Those with an interest in clinical, educational or researcoh applications of Mindfulness Meditation, Progressive Relaxation and/or Walk -Talk Therapy.

Speakers:
Dr. Wes Sime, PhD, MPH, Professor Emeritus

Mindfulness meditation (MM) has become the new hot topic in research, clinical and educational settings.  The research supporting it's effectiveness is building exponentially as widely varied applications are studied, some of which include stress management.  Many of those conducting the research and clinical outcomes do not use the extensive psychophysiology technology to document the mechanisms by which it is effective.  Progressive relaxation (PR) is a long standing adjunctive method of treating many medical and psychological maladies.  The original methods of Jacobson have gone by the wayside as new thinkers apply truncated and abridged versions of the concept of "tension control" which omit the finite gradations and progressively dimineshing levels of muscle activity.  Similarly, many conducting research and clinical outcomes fail to use EMG measures to document the decay curve of muscle activity.  Walk-Talk Therapy (Sime, 1988) has been shown to treat depression as well or better than medication or CBT alone.  In this presentation, MM, PR and Walk-Talk therapy will be discussed and debated along with brief demonstrations of effectiveness of each method by introspection. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Review the history of the traditional progressive relaxation ala Edmund Jacobson noting comparisons to modern methods
  • Demonstrate the oncept of "tension control" with finite gradations and progressively dimineshing levels of muscle activity.
  • Summarize the applications of functional relaxation in the real world as a transfer of training outcomes of progressive relaxation (PR)
  • Discuss the theories and application of Walk Talk Therapy which are contrasted with CBT and personal training in exercise
  • Discuss the comparisons in mind state and psychophysiology outcomes from Mindfulness versus PR and Walk Talk     

BOS19 Performance Anxiety Interventions for Classical Musicians
 

CEUs: 1
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Introductory                                   
Focus: Clinical
Who should attend: Clinicians, those who work with athletes, musicians, or individuals in high stress occupations.

Speakers:
Ms. Tara Austin, MS, Brigham Young University
Dr. Patrick Steffen, PhD, Brigham Young University

Performance anxiety and stress are forefront problems for performers in the music industry.  Professional musicians exhibit significantly higher levels of physiological and psychological distress than the average person, including elevated cortisol levels pre and post performance, as well as high levels of self-reported depression and anxiety. Within music training programs, these problems are particularly debilitating, with students concerned both about performance situations and also their personal lives.  Additionally, those who report high levels of performance related anxiety, regardless of performance outcomes, report higher levels of occupational strain and lower abilities to control impulsive behavior, including substance use. This presentation will begin with data from a recent meta-analysis, comparing the effects of cognitive, physiological, and combination interventions for musicians. It will present data from two follow up studies.  The first pilot study compared biofeedback and a sham biofeedback condition to examine the practicality and acceptability of an intervention with student musicians. The final study will present preliminary objective and subjective data from 45 musicians at both Brigham Young University and the Royal College of Music in London, with approximately half in an HRV biofeedback condition and half in the compassion focused therapy group. Objective measures are taken pre and post performance, presenting the first study looking at outcomes in a live performance affecting their position in the program.

Learning Objectives:

  • Summarize basic interventions for performance anxiety.
  • Understand the differences between physiological and cognitive interventions for performance anxiety.
  • Understand how compassion focused therapy compliments HRV biofeedback.

BOS20 Agonism and antagonism among the shoulder muscles: an SEMG approach
 

CEUs: 1
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Intermediate
Focus: Clinical and Research
Who should attend: All audiences are welcome, beginners, intermediate and advanced.

Speakers:
Gabriel E. Sella, MD, BSC, MSc, MPH, PhD(c), Alecto Medical Services

Muscular agonism (synergism) and antagonism is a long standing principle of muscular action. The concept is held to be true by many generations of scientist without actual proof except the anatomic position of the muscles of a joint. With the advent of the SEMG functional investigation of joint range of motion (ROM) it was possible to devise statistical documentation of the existence of agonism and antagoinsm of the muscles of any joint. In this presentation the author will document the presence and relative values of the agonistic and antagonistic relationships of most muscles of the shoulder joint.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learning of the definitions of muscular agonism (synergism) and antagonism
  • Learning to utilize SEMG dynamic studies to generate correlation coefficient statistics necessary to document inter-muscular relationships
  • Learning to document the agonistic and antagonistic muscular relationships of the shoulder joint through the ROM
  • Learning to utilize the knowledge above in the clinical and ergonomic fields, including athletics

BOS21 Practical Protocols
 

CEUs: 1
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Introductory                                   
Focus: Clinical
Who should attend: Beginning and intermediate Biofeedback clinicians who are seeking practical training protocols to use to build their clinical training approach.

Speakers:
Ms. Jinny Jay LaRock, RN, BCB, Sr. Fellow, Denver Biofeedback Clinic, Inc.

This talk will provide you with very practical tools for understanding, designing and implementing a systematic biofeedback training protocol.  We will discuss the goals of biofeedback training and how focus on this systematic training in four areas meet these goals and move your clients towards success in self-awareness and self-regulation.  The areas of focus will include Breath, Mind, Muscle and Autonomic Nervous System training.  We will discuss use of instrumentation and also successful transfer of skills to daily life.  I will have materials available including a home training CD and a book that is instrumental in client home training.  You will learn how to provide training and tools to your client which will help them to understand the mechanism of stress and their own symptoms as well as skills to modify and manage stress which can be drawn upon in the months and years ahead.

Learning Objectives:

  • Summarize basic goals of Biofeedback clinical training
  • Recognize the benefit of an organized goal-driven approach to session protocols
  • Design a plan for systematic clinical training that includes EMG, TEMP and GSR instrumentation      

BOS22 Wearables and the Quantified Self
 

CEUs: 1
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Introductory                                   
Focus: Clinical and Research
Who should attend: Any practitioners

Speakers:
Dr. Richard Harvey, PhD, San Francisco State University

Wearable devices used in conjunction with cell phones is the future of Bio/Neurfeedback.    This workshop covers the frontier of this emerging field and will include a variety of experiential examples with actual devices.    Wearable and portable devices that monitor modalities such as heart rate, breathing, posture, as well as brain or muscle activity make it easier than ever to learn about our physiological reactions to various situations.      This presentation introduces strategies for using existing technologies that help people shift from attentional awareness of frequency, intensity and time duration of reactions to intentional choices reflecting deliberate, planned actions.      Educating clients and patients how to extend what they learn from a practitioner into everyday living situations requires holistic planning that address fundamental questions – What, When, Where, Who, Why, How, If/Then –  that enable greater precision when implementing personalized plans that address dynamically changing circumstances.      Whether working to ameliorate symptoms of chief complaints that are physical or mental in nature, or developing enhancement to performance that facilitate moving faster, jumping higher or building stronger bodies (e.g. the Olympic motto of ‘Citius, Altius, Fortius’), wearable and portable technology may be employed to benefit all users.  Relevant Bio/Neurofeedback principles will be infused during the workshop with the practitioner in mind.  

Learning Objectives:

  • Assess the viability of wearable monitoring and biofeedback devices
  • Develop a plan for utilizing portable devices in everyday situations
  • Compare the strengths and limitations of wearable devices

9:30am-10:30am
 

KEY06 Distinguished Scientist Lecture: It Takes a Village to Increase HRV: A Celebration of My Colleagues’ Inspiring Ideas

CEUs: 1
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level:                               
Focus:
Who should attend: Clinicians, educators, and optimal performance professionals concerned with optimal performance, resilience, stress, and autonomic dysregulation, and who are interested in heart rate variability for training and/or measurement.

Speakers:
Dr. Fredric Shaffer, PhD, BCB-HRV, Truman University

Dr. Shaffer will celebrate the seminal contributions of our amazing colleagues to the emerging science of heart rate variability (HRV). He will trace HRV biofeedback’s development, highlight revolutionary ideas that can transform our understanding of health, disease, and healthcare delivery, and describe concrete applications of our “village’s” discoveries.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will be able to explain why a healthy heart is not a metronome.
  • Attendees will be able to describe how resonance frequency breathing and rhythmic muscle contraction can “exercise” the baroreflex and increase heart rate variability.
  • Attendees will be able to explain why overbreathing threatens the success of HRV biofeedback and how to overcome this problem.
  • Attendees will be able to describe effective home practice assignments to increase HRV biofeedback training success.

10:30am-11:00am
 

Networking Break / EXHIBITOR DRAWING
 

11:00am-12:30pm
 

BOS23 Brain-Computer Interface Technology for Rehabilitation and Brain Assessment
 

CEUs: 1.5
Track: Hot Topics
Level: Advanced
Focus:
Who should attend: Neurologists, Therapists, Neuroscientists

Speakers:
Dr. Christoph Guger, CEO, g.tec medical engineering GmbH

Brain-Computer Interface systems can be used for many different applications. The talk will show two high impact applications: (i) motor recovery of stroke patients and (ii) consciousness assessment and communication. Newest validation results of a BCI system for stroke rehabilitation from research in Austria, Japan, China and the USA will be shown. Assessment and rehabilitation strategies for patients with disorders of consciousness and communication with locked-in patients will be explained.

Learning Objectives:

  • How can a BCI system be used for stroke rehabilitation
  • How can a BCI system be used for the assessment of patients with disorders of consciousness
  • How can a patient with disorders communicate with the environment
  • Which principles are important for BCI based stroke rehabilitation
  • What is important to get significant improvements in BCI based stroke rehabilitation

BOS24 Heart Rate Variability and Parasympathetic Health: The Importance of Sleep
 

CEUs: 1.5
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Intermediate
Focus: Clinical and Research
Who should attend: Physicians, sleep specialists, research scientists, clinical HRV biofeedback specialists, students.

Speakers:
Dr. James Burch, PhD, University of South Carolina
Dr. Phyllis Stein, PhD, Washington University, School of Medicine HRV Laboratory
Dr. Ron Gharbo, DO

Heart Rate Variability (HRV) parameters reflect the functioning of the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system.  Improvements in HRV, reflecting increased parasympathetic and decreased sympathetic activity, have emerged as reliable markers of emotional resilience, stress reduction, optimal cognitive functioning, improved physical performance, better symptom management and improved health. Elevated HRV has been associated with greater longevity.  The goal of promoting “parasympathetic health” is to provide behavioral modification strategies that reduce unhealthy coping behaviors and shift individuals towards self-directed health practices that promote resilience, improve autonomic balance, reduce stress, and promote optimal performance and self-actualization. These interrelated health-enhancing practices are likely to both promote and benefit from optimal sleep, because sleep itself is strongly influenced by the autonomic nervous system.     The purpose of this symposium is to provide an overview of healthy autonomic activity during sleep; and relate HRV to sleep and sleep disorders including: insomnia, unrefreshing sleep, short sleep, and sleep-disordered breathing.  Practices that can improve sleep and health by improving autonomic functioning during sleep will be presented.  This symposium will include specific information about how to measure the functioning of the autonomic nervous system using HRV, how to acquire and interpret HRV measures obtained during sleep, and research findings about the beneficial effects of HRV biofeedback on sleep.  We also propose that cardiorespiratory phase synchronization, a phenomenon that occurs during restorative deep sleep, likely serves as an underlying process that fosters parasympathetic health.  Research that provides further details about the autonomic profiles seen in healthy people and those with abnormal sleep, as well as changes in these profiles resulting from practices that improve parasympathetic health, will be presented.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the role of reduced heart rate variability (HRV) as an indicator of stress, poor health, and mortality risk.
  • Understand how to measure autonomic nervous system function using HRV.
  • Understand how to acquire and interpret HRV measures obtained during sleep.
  • Understand the role of HRV coherence as an indicator of balanced autonomic activity, and the potential benefits of HRV biofeedback on sleep.

BOS25 History of Coherence-based Neurofeedback
 

CEUs: 1.5
Track: Basic Science
Level: Intermediate
Focus: Clinical and Research
Who should attend: All those interested in the benefits of neurofeedback.

Speakers:
Dr. Robert Coben, PhD, Neuropsychologist
Dr. Anne Stevens, PhD, 12:00:00 AM

Coherence neurofeedback training has at it's goal the enhancement of brain synchronization to optimize performance and reduce symptoms. The history of coherence training dates back 20 years or more to the work of Joe Horvat and Jonathan Walker (Walker, 2007). Early pioneers included Jonathan Walker and Kirtley Thornton. Over the past several years, we have seen advancements in the ways we assess coherence and connectivity that provide great insights into brain functioning (Coben, Rezazadeh & Cannon, 2014). This understanding has led to approaching coherence in a multivariate fashion that enhances it's accuracy (Kus, Kaminshi & Blinowska, 2004). Multivariate autoregressive statistical tools have become critical to this endeavor. This led to an enhancement in how we do neurofeedback training which now uses four sensors and trains coherence in a multivariate fashion (Coben et al., 2018). This presentation will review the empirical evidence supporting this approach in various clinical populations. We have shown it to be more efficient in changing power and coherence than two channel coherence training. In fact, in this large sample in excess of 170 subjects coherence changed with four channel training by more than four times that of those that received two channel training. In a study of learning disability, this method has shown an advantage of at least 33% over other neurofeedback methods. We have also conducted a project applying it to major depression with significant findings in a crossover design with a two year follow-up as well. Our seizure project has also shown an increase in neurofeedback efficacy of close to 50% compared to SMR training and two channel coherence training. In studies with children with autism it has had shown higher efficacy levels as well. And lastly, we will present new data applying this technique to neurofeedback training to survivors of developmental trauma.

Learning Objectives:

  • Define coherence
  • Appreciate the difference between pairwise and multivariate measures of coherence
  • Understand multivariate approaches to coherence and connectivity
  • Understanding advancements in coherence training

BOS26 New Advances in Electrical NeuroImaging to Evaluate EEG Sources, Brain Networks and Neurofeedback Protocols
 

CEUs: 1.5
Track: Basic Science
Level: Introdcutory
Focus:
Who should attend: Students, clinicians and researchers

Speakers:
Dr. Robert W. Thatcher, PhD, Applied Neuroscience Research Institute

The 3-dimensional evaluation of the sources of non-ictal discharges and focal gross pathologies has recently been enhanced using advanced technology called swLORETA (weighted sLORETA (Palmero-Soler et al, 2007).   swLORETA uses Single-Value-Decomposition (SVD) to weight the lead field in order to increase lead field homogeneity and hence improved localization of deep sources.  This allows for estimates of EEG sources in different layers of the cortex.   Also, swLORETA uses a real MRI and not an average MRI with 12,270 voxels and a Boundary-Element-Method (BEM) of source localization (Wroel and Aliahadi, 2002).  Non-ictal events and gross pathologies are localized inside of 3‚Äźdimensional volumes with the aid of slice and volume cutting tools to allow one to navigate through the brain and identify dysregulated brain network hubs (Brodmann areas) and connections. Computations include Functional Connectivity (Coherence, Lagged Coherence and Phase Difference) and Effective Connectivity (Phase Slope Index) of the magnitude and direction of information flow between network hubs as well as integration with Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI).  A useful method is to also view the EEG potentials on a transparent scalp while simultaneously viewing the deeper sources of the EEG from inside the brain. Both raw scores and Z scores are used as well as the Laplacian transform of the scalp EEG. Examples of source localization in patients with gross pathologies such as epileptic foci and stroke will be presented.  Also, how to create a Neurofeedback protocol will be demonstrated.    Palmero-Soler, K. Dolan, V. Hadamschek et al., (2007). swLORETA: a novel approach to robust source localization and synchronization tomography, Physics in medicine and biology, 52: 1783-1794    Wrobel, L. C.; Aliabadi, M. H. (2002), The Boundary Element Method, New York: John Wiley & Sons, p. 1066, ISBN 0-470-84139-7

Learning Objectives:

  • Evaluate and assess brain dysregulation linked to symptoms
  • Use swLORETA to image EEG currents and connections in real-time
  • Develop Neurofeedback protocols
  • Form hypotheses and test hypotheses about likely brain networks linked to symptoms

BOS27 The Efficacy of Video Games Versus Antidepressants in Reducing Somatic Complaints
 

CEUs: 1.5
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Advanced
Focus: Clinical and Research
Who should attend: Practitioners and researchers interested in HRV biofeedback, PTS, the military and somatic symptoms.

Speakers:
Dr. Carmen Russoniello, PhD, LRT/CTRS, LPC, BCB, BCN, Center for Applied Psychophysiology, East Carolina University
Dr. Matthew Fish, PhD, LRT/CTRS, LPC, BCN, Assistant Professor, Center for Applied Psychophysiology, East Carolina University
Ms Christina Brown-Bochicchio, MS, LRT/CTRS, Center for Applied Psychophysiology East Carolina University
Obrien, K, PhD, Professor of Biostatistics, East Carolina University
Aaron Craven, BS, LRT/CTRS, Center for Applied Psychophysiology East Carolina University
John Locke, BS, LRT/CTRS, Center for Applied Psychophysiology East Carolina University
Audrey Norris, BS, Center for Applied Psychophysiology East Carolina University

This session will cover a three-phase research study that has been measuring the efficacy of prescribed video games in reducing clinical depression, anxiety and stress using psychophysiological methods. in Data from two clinical trials comparing video games with bibliotherapy and antidepressants will be reviewed. Specific focus will be on somatic changes that occurred during the studies. A model to further understand the positive health benefits of these games and their uses in therapy will be presented.

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize common somatic symptoms.
  • Compare results from a controlled clinical study.
  • Summarize characteristics of casual video games and their underlying concepts and theories.
  • Relate somatic symptom reductions with therapeutic qualities of casual video games and their side effects.
  • Summarize characteristics of antidepressants and their therapeutic qualities and side effects.

DoD Disclaimers: The views expressed in this poster presentation reflect the results of research conducted by the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Navy, Department of Defense, nor the U.S. Government.
The study protocol was approved by the Naval Medical Center Camp Lejeune Institutional Review Board in compliance with all applicable Federal regulations governing the protection of human subjects.

BOS28 Update on CPT coding and Insurance reimbursement
 

CEUs: 1.5
Track: Hot Topics
Level: Intermediate
Focus: Clinical and Research
Who should attend: Anyone interested please in CPT coding and reimbursement.

Speakers:
Mr. Mark Trullinger, Msc, BCN

This will be an update on CPT coding and insurance reimbursement efforts by AAPB/ISNR/BCIA and other interested parties.

Learning Objectives:

  • Know the value of Mental Health Parity related to insurance reimbursement.
  • Know how to bill and code correctly, and why.
  • Be able to differentiate between the use of biofeedback and Neurofeedack for treating a clinical condition or not.

12:30pm-2:00pm
 

Lunch Break


BOS40: Improving Patient Outcomes: Translating Bio/Neurofeedback, Photomodulation and VR from Office to Home
 

CEUs: 1.5
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Intermediate
Focus: Clinical and Research
Who should attend: Mental Health professionals and students interested in learning about cutting age technologies.

Speakers:
Dr. Robert Reiner, Ph.D., BCN, BCB (BCIA), Executive Director, Behavioral Associates

I will provide a history and scientific rationale for the use of virtual reality and other cutting-edge technologies which are now considered a gold standard for anxiety management.  The newest technology to catch our attention is home based neurofeedback (Myndlift) and how we integrate it into out-patient care.  I will also be showing how NeuroField devices like pEMF and tDCS/ACS can be implemented.  Following the presentation, attendees will have a broad understanding of available technologies and how and why they have been so successful.  I will be joined by Dr. Heather Davidson the Director of our Child and Adolescent program who will be explaining how to use these technologies with children and adolescents.

Learning Objectives:

  • To teach people the history of virtual reality.
  • Teach participations the underlying theory that supports the use of virtual reality as an exposure to all.
  • Why using biofeedback is more effective than simple extinction.
  • How to integrate home based neurofeedback (Myndlift) into out-patient care.
  • How to combine biofeedback with virtual reality.

 

12:45pm-1:45pm
 

KEY07 Lunch and Learn: Build Your Dream Business - Strategies & Systems to Ensure Sustainable Growth, Employee Excellence and Clinical Results
 

CEUs: 1
Track: Hot Topics
Level: Intermediate
Focus: Practice Management
Who should attend: Everyone. At both ISNR and AAPB an overwhelming majority of the crowd said this topic needed to be heard by everyone in the field and should be a Keynote. This includes Lynda and Michael Thompson who can vouch for the presentation.

Speakers:
Mr. Seth Conger, BCN-t, Chief Operating Officer

The safety card on any airplane instructs that in the case of disaster, you are to put your oxygen mask on first before assisting others. The same should be true for your business, however we commonly prioritize our patient’s concerns and needs over the strength and sustainability of our own businesses. We rarely take time to work ON the business because we are so busy working IN the business, and week after week, month after month we find ourselves too BUSY to plan for the future, as if we would know what to do even if the time was available…    Would life be better if you could work less hours, reward your employees better, drive the value of your business up by 2-3x, have a sustainable growth (or exit) plan and end up with better patient outcomes? Even one of those could be life changing, but all are reachable within a fairly short period of time, if you set up the right system.    There are specific business principles and strategies which apply to any field and any size business, including Neurofeedback Clinics. These principles, along with specific Neurofeedback marketing and financial strategies can help transform your business into a sustainable machine that allows you to fulfill your dreams, while providing an excellent experience and the highest level of care to your patients.    In 2014 I embarked on a journey to understand the theory and practice of Neurofeedback and I’ve spent thousands of hours, becoming BCIA technician certified, integrating Neurofeedback and Biofeedback into a successful Functional Medicine practice, and developing the business models needed to expand any clinic. You do not need an MBA to run a successful business, but you do need a strategy and you need to understand how to apply it.    To provide the best experience and achieve the greatest results with your patients, you first must build and maintain a sustainable business. Most of us do the opposite, relying on our clinical care experience, resources and technology to help patients while leaving the business as an afterthought. If you build it, they will come…right? Unfortunately, not. Luckily, it is never too late to develop the business strategies and systems to grow a successful, sustainable practice. A new amplifier, software update or protocol will not be the catalyst to sustainable growth of your business and greater personal and professional fulfillment… this course may be.

Learning Objectives:

  • Develop systems to ensure sustainable growth of your business
  • Avoid common business disasters by practicing fundamentals
  • Strategies to support the personal and professional development of your staff
  • Establish a Vision, Mission and Core Values for your business
  • Recognize the true value of the services they provide & learn how to promote that value

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