Friday Schedule

Friday, March 15
 

6:00am-7:00am
 

Yoga/Meditation
 

7:00am-7:00pm
 

Registration

7:00am-8:00am
 

Continental Breakfast in Expo Hall
 

7:00am-8:00am
 

Springer Breakfast Meeting - Editorial Board
 

8:00am-9:00am
 

Exhibitor Demonstration: Cambridge Brain Sciences

CEUs: 0

Interested in measuring and tracking the cognitive function of your patients? In this entertaining and informative demonstration, you will see how CBS Health quickly and effectively quantifies key aspects of a patient’s cognition, such as memory, reasoning, concentration, and verbal ability. CBS Health tasks are directly linked to distinct brain regions and networks, perfectly complementing neurofeedback treatment sessions and qEEG outputs. Learn more and benefit from the opportunity of a free 1-week trial.

ORAL1 Practical Applications of HRV Biofeedback Research – Four 15 Minute Presentations

CEUs: 1

An Overview of Antidepressant Effects on Heart Rate Variability Measurements

Level: Advanced
Focus: Clinical and Research
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Who should attend: Clinicians and researchers who measure and train HRV in clients who use antidepressants.

Speakers:
Mr. Zachary Meehan, BS Psychology, Truman University

Clinicians and researchers who utilize heart rate variability (HRV) often assume that antidepressants uniformly suppress HRV time- and frequency-domain measurements. This oral paper synthesizes studies of the effects of tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) and serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) to describe their respective effects on HRV and the strength of the experimental evidence..

Learning Objectives:

  • be able to explain the purpose of HRV time-domain and frequency-domain measurements.
  • be able to describe the mechanisms of tricyclic and serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors.
  • be able to describe the effects of tricyclic and serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors on time- and frequency-domain measurements of HRV.

Confirmation that Rhythmical Skeletal Muscle Tension (RSMT) Can Increase Heart Rate Variability

Level: Introductory
Focus: Research
Track: Basic Science
Who should attend: Clinicians and researchers who utilize HRV biofeedback training

Speakers:
Ms. Hannah Urban, BS Psychology, Truman University
Mr. Nicholas Gravett, BS Biology and Psychology, Truman University

Evgeny Vaschillo, Bronya Vaschillo, and Paul Lehrer have demonstrated that rhythmical stimulation, by displaying pictures and rhythmical skeletal muscle tension (RSMT), can stimulate the baroreceptor reflex like resonance frequency breathing and increase time- and frequency-domain measures of heart rate variability (HRV). In their RSMT study, 16 participants placed in a semi-recumbent position rhythmically contracted their hands and feet 3, 6, and 12 times per minute. RSMT only produced high-amplitude oscillations in blood pressure, heart rate, and vascular tone at the 6-contractions-per-minute (0.1 Hz) rate. The present study replicated this design with 45 undergraduates. A Thought Technology ProComp Infiniti ™ system monitored ECG, HRV, EMG, and respiration. Active ECG electrodes were placed on the upper chest below the sternum and the reference centered on the xiphoid process. A respirometer was positioned over the navel in order to measure abdominal excursion and respiration rate. Active EMG electrodes were centered over the flexor carpi ulnaris for a manipulation check of rhythmic skeletal muscle contraction. Participants were randomly assigned to one of six different orders of 3, 6, and 12 muscle contractions per minute, separated by 3-minute buffer periods. Participants received verbal prompts when to perform a 3-second contraction but did not receive feedback. Following manual artifact removal, data were transformed using a natural log transformation and were analyzed using a General Linear Model Repeated Measures ANOVA. Participants contracted their hands and feet at the prescribed frequencies and respiration rate was equivalent across all three conditions. The 6-contractions-per-minute condition produced the greatest increases in time- and frequency-domain, and nonlinear HRV. These findings partially replicate the Vaschillo, Vaschillo, and Lehrer data and suggest that RSMT offers an alternative method by which clients can increase HRV.

Learning Objectives:

  • be able to explain the baroreceptor reflex.
  • be able to describe several methods to stimulate the baroreceptor reflex to increase HRV.
  • be able to explain the effects of 0.1 Hz rhythmic skeletal muscle contraction on heart rate and time-, frequency-domain, and nonlinear HRV measurements.

Limits of Agreement (LoA) Determination of Minimum Epochs for Estimating 5-Min Ultra-Short-Term (UST) Heart Rate Variability Measurements

Level: Introductory
Focus: Clinical and Research
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Who should attend: Clinicians and researchers who utilize heart rate variability in their practice.

Speakers:
Mr. Nicholas Gravett, BS Biology and Psychology, Truman University
Ms. Hannah Urban, BS Psychology, Truman University

The present study used Altman and Bland's (1983) limits of agreement (LoA) technique to establish minimum epochs for estimating 5-min resting ultra-short-term (UST) time domain, frequency domain, and nonlinear heart rate variability (HRV) measurements for healthy undergraduates. A Thought Technology ProComp™ Infiniti system monitored ECG and respiration. Active ECG electrodes were located on the lower torso. A respirometer was positioned over the navel to measure abdominal excursion and respiration rate. Subjects were stabilized for 5 min and then monitored for 7 min sitting upright, with eyes open, no feedback, and instructions to breathe normally. The investigators extracted 10-, 20-, 30-, 60-, 90-, 120-, 180-, and 240-s segments from 5-min resting ECG recordings of 100 healthy undergraduates, 50 men and 50 women, ages 18 to 23. Following manual artifacting, data were normalized using a natural log transformation. A LoA analysis (allowable difference = ± 5% of the range) was used to determine the minimum sample required to estimate 5-min time domain (heart rate, HR Max – HR Min, HRV triangular index, NN50, pNN50, RMSSD, SDNN, and TINN), frequency domain (absolute VLF, LF, and HF power, normalized LF and HF power, and LF/HF ratio) and nonlinear (SD1, SD2, ApEn, SampEn, D2, detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) indices ɑ1 and β1, and recurrence plot analysis (RPA) indices DET and ShanEn) HRV measurements.

Learning Objectives:

  • be able to explain Bland and Altman's Limits of Agreement (LOA) criterion.
  • be able to explain why the LOA criterion is more rigorous than linear correlation.
  • be able to recognize the minimum epochs required to estimate 5-min resting HRV time domain, frequency domain, and nonlinear metrics.

Updated Heart Rate Variability Norms for Healthy Undergraduates

Level: Introductory
Focus: Clinical and Research
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Who should attend: Clinicians and researchers who utilize heart rate variability in their practice.

Speakers:
Mr. Nicholas Gravett, BS Biology and Psychology, Truman University
Ms. Hannah Urban, BS Psychology, Truman University

The current study calculated heart rate variability (HRV), respiration, and accessory surface EMG norms for 100 healthy undergraduates (50 men and 50 women) 18 to 26 years of age to aid clinicians and researchers. The calculation of norms for 9 nonlinear HRV measurements for this age group addressed an important deficiency in the literature. A Thought Technology ProComp™ Infiniti system monitored ECG, respiration, and accessory SEMG. Active ECG electrodes were placed about 2 inches above the navel and 4 inches to the left and right of the midline and the reference electrode was centered over the angle of the sternum. A respirometer was positioned over the navel to measure abdominal excursion and respiration rate. SEMG active electrodes were placed over the belly of the right trapezius and scalene muscles, with the reference electrode over the spine. Subjects were stabilized for 5 minutes and then monitored for 5 minutes sitting upright, with eyes open, no feedback, and instructions to breathe normally. Data were artifacted within CardioPro and then detrended in Kubios 3.0 using a smoothness priors procedure. Frequency domain analysis utilized a Fast Fourier Transformation-based Welch’s periodogram procedure and autoregressive analysis. Means and standard deviations were calculated for HRV time domain measures (heart rate, HR Max – HR Min, HRV triangular index, NN50, pNN50, RMSSD, SDNN, and TINN), frequency domain measures (absolute VLF, LF, and HF power, normalized LF and HF power, and LF/HF ratio), and nonlinear measures (SD1, SD2, ApEn, SampEn, D2, detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) indices ɑ1 and β1, and recurrence plot analysis (RPA) indices DET and ShanEn), respiration measures (respiration amplitude and rate, and end-tidal CO2), ECG-respiration phase angle, and accessory SEMG.

Learning Objectives:

  • be able to describe seven heart rate variability time domain measurements
  • be able to explain Fast Fourier and autoregressive analysis of heart rate variability data
  • be able to describe six heart rate variability frequency domain measurements
  • be able to describe 9 heart rate variability nonlinear measurements

BOS01 Using The qEEG To Help Coaches Enhance Player Performance
 

CEUs: 1
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Intermediate
Focus: Clinical and Research
Who should attend: Clinicians/Practitioners, individuals working with athletes, coaches, athletes

Speakers:
Dr. Stuart Donaldson, PhD, Myosymmetries

In working with the coaching staff of junior A hockey players in Alberta, the qEEG has been used to assist coaches in designing strategies to help enhance player performance. The qEEG is used to assess each player before the hockey season starts not only for sconcussion, but for any sites that are flagged as impaired. Those flagged sites are noted and used to show the coach the different learning styles of the players, the learning strategies for the player that may help them succeed and perform at an optimal level, and to assist the coach in learning if the player is for example a practice player versus a game player and the reasons in the brain as to why the player is the way they are. The qEEG is also used to show the coach the level of mental fatigue throughout the game for a player (if the player performs better in the first two periods compared to the third period). In working with the coach, we work together to find strategies to help the player perform at their best knowing what to work on for each player, whether it is treatment or strategic coaching.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn how to utilize the qEEG for performance enhancement
  • Learn how different sites are used to determine learning styles and strategies for athletes/hockey players
  • Recognize the impacts a qEEG has on coaching athletes/hockey players

BOS02 Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback for Pain, Stress, Fatigue, and Depression among Veterans
 

CEUs: 1
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Intermediate
Focus: Clinical and Research
Who should attend: Physicians, clinical psychologists, research scientists, clinical HRV biofeedback specialists, and students.

Speakers:
Dr. Jim Burch, PhD, University of South Carolina

Pain is often accompanied by signs and symptoms that include stress, sympathetic activation, fatigue, and depression. Heart rate variability biofeedback (HRVB) training can induce a state of ‘HRV coherence’ that facilitates cardiorespiratory homeostasis, reduces sympathetic activity, maximizes HRV, and ameliorates pain and related symptoms. This randomized, sham-controlled, intervention trial will test the hypothesis that HRVB can improve HRV coherence and alleviate pain, stress, fatigue and depression among chronic pain patients. Participants are randomly assigned to either an active HRVB training group or a sham condition (target n=40 per group, total planned enrollment N=80). The primary outcomes include: a 15-minute resting HRV recording (HRV Coherence Ratio), and questionnaires for pain and stress. Secondary outcomes include symptoms of: pain catastrophizing, fatigue, and depression. Each patient completes a baseline assessment, 6 weekly training sessions (HRVB or sham), a post-training assessment, a booster training session and assessment (1-month post-training), and a follow-up assessment (2-months post-training). Each participant is provided with a portable, data-logging HRVB or sham (squeeze ball) device to evaluate treatment compliance and sustainability. To date, 68 patients completed their baseline assessment; 45 completed their post-training assessment, and 37 completed the entire protocol. In preliminary analyses, HRVB patients had elevated mean HRV Coherence Ratios at the post-training assessment relative to baseline (0.24±.27 at baseline vs. 0.77±0.94 post-training, n=23, p<0.001), whereas no differences were observed among controls (0.22±0.18 vs. 0.21±0.18, n=22, p=0.83). Among all participants at baseline, scores for pain, stress, pain catastrophizing, fatigue, and depression were intercorrelated (Pearson pair-wise correlation coefficients [r]=0.34 to 0.87, n=68, all p<0.01). Elevated HRV Coherence Ratios at baseline were correlated with lower (better) symptom scores for pain severity (r=-0.23, n=68, p=0.05), and stress (r=-0.24, n=68, p=0.05; other correlations p>0.05). Results from mixed effects statistical models testing the efficacy of HRVB to address study hypotheses in the targeted sample will be presented at the meeting. At baseline, pain, stress, fatigue, and depression formed a distinct symptom cluster. Preliminary results indicate receipt of intervention among HRVB participants studied to date. Non-pharmacological therapies to improve pain and related symptoms may benefit patients with injuries or other disorders.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the role of reduced heart rate variability (HRV) as an indicator of stress, poor health, and increased mortality risk.
  • Understand the relationship between resonant frequency breathing and HRV coherence.
  • Understand the role of HRV coherence as an indicator of balanced autonomic activity.

BOS03 MultiCultural Diversity Supports Healing Justice
 

CEUs: 1
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Introductory
Focus: Clinical
Who should attend: Practitioners and administrators who need to update their training programs to address current best practices related to Multi-Cultural and, healing justice content

Speakers:
Dr. Richard Harvey, PhD, San Francisco State University

This presentation identifies considerations related to multi-cultural and diversity training useful for research, education and clinical professionals. The one-hour introduction presents current models and terminology which can extend educator and clinician awareness about multicultural diversity. Participants will learn three basic models of multicultural diversity focusing on cultural a) competence, b) efficacy and, c) humility; as well as a continuum of organizational development as described by the National Center for Cultural Competence (NCCC). For example, the publication Towards a Culturally Competent System of Care asserts cultural competence occurs on a continuum of stages identified as: 1) cultural destructiveness (e.g. attitudes, policies and practices that are undermining of a cultural group); 2) cultural incapacity (e.g. lack of ability to respond to culturally and linguistically diverse groups); 3) cultural blindness (e.g. treating all people as the same without resources for acquiring knowledge about diverse cultures); 4) cultural pre-competence (e.g. commitment to supporting civil and human rights however without a plan for achieving organizational or individual multi-cultural diversity training); 5) cultural competency (e.g. dedicated resources for ongoing training and support of multi-cultural diversity); 6) cross-cultural efficacy and proficiency (e.g. active pursuit of social justice and advocacy for disadvantaged diverse multi-cultural experiences); and, 7) cultural humility (e.g. engaging in regular self-evaluation about power-imbalances between service providers and receivers). Curricular concepts for training include descriptions of a ‘CRASH’ course for multicultural diversity training with the following emphases: “(a) consider Culture, (b) show Respect, (c) Assess and affirm differences, (d) show Sensitivity and self-awareness, and (e) provide care with Humility where each component subdivides into various learning objectives. For example, when providing care with Humility, the trainee must follow a LEARN model (cf. Berlin & Fowles, 1983) that values Listening with sympathy and understanding; Explaining points of view in understandable, non-technical language; and Acknowledging similarities and differences in the approach to education and treatment; Recommending a mutually acceptable course of action; and, Negotiating other aspects of care.

Learning Objectives:

  • Summarize three basic models used in Multicultural diversity training
  • Identify stages of awareness about multicultural diversity within health education and healthcare organizations
  • State methods for implementing multicultural diversity awareness training curriculums for individuals and organizations.

9:15am-10:30am
 

KEY02 Our Roots, Our People, and Our Journey: Why, Where, Who, What, When

CEUs: 1
Track: Hot Topics
Level: Introductory
Focus:
Who should attend: All attendees

Speakers:
Dr. Mark Schwartz, PhD, Emeritus, Mayo Clinic

This presentation will discuss many, diverse, influential, and interactional components of the origins of the Biofeedback Research Society, the Biofeedback Society of America, and then the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback. I will include how the BSA created the BCIA (originally Biofeedback Certification Institute of America and now Biofeedback Certification International Alliance), its history and its importance. Included will be discussion of many truly pioneering people, early events, and many of the people that followed in the early and middle years of the organization. We will observe recognitions and remembrances to those departed major contributors to our field and organization, and recognitions and thanks for those who are still with us.

The presentation will include the importance of learning about history, some of the controversies, challenges and problems faced by this organization, some of the frustrations and disappointments, some of the myths and facts, as well as some of the solutions and achievements.

Part of the presentation will reflect the presenter’s personal views and experiences. Remembering and learning about the history of this field, the professional organization, the issues and challenges, and perspectives, and notable people are needed for competent students, practitioners, educators, and historians to know and understand to be considered erudite.

Some history of the presence of diversity will be noted and the presentation will note the importance of formally recognizing and supporting continuing and expanding on multiple types of diversity.

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss many, diverse, influential, and interactional components of the origins of the BRS, BSA, and AAPB.
  • Recall many truly pioneering people, early events, and many of the people that followed in the early and middle years of the organization.
  • Explain how the BSA created the BCIA, its history and its importance.
  • Discuss the controversies, the challenges and problems faced by this organization.
  • Explain some history of the presence of diversity in the organization and the value of formalizing diversity and supporting expanding on multiple types of diversity.

10:30am to 11am
 

Break (Refreshments)
 

11:00am-12:30pm
 

Exhibitor Demonstration: Thought Technology

CEUs: 0
Be the first to see Thought Technology’s first! The exhibitor demo will showcase the new TPS Clinical system. The first product that links the wireless sensors of TPS and Biograph Infiniti, to provide elaborate statistics and modifiable protocols not capable with a simple app. Join Frank DeGregorio and experience it!

BOS04 The Future of Biofeedback Education and Research in Academia
 

CEUs: 1.5
Track: Hot Topics
Level: Intermediate
Focus:
Who should attend: Practitioners, educators, academic administrators and students

Speakers:
Dr. Carmen V. Russoniello, PhD, LRT/CTRS, LPC, BCB, BCN, Professor and Director for the Center for Applied Psychophysiology
Dr. Matthew Fish, PhD, LRT/CTRS, BCB, East Carolina University
Ms. Christina M. Brown-Bochicchio, PhD(c), MS, CTRS, Visiting Instructor, Florida International University
Dr. Tami Fragedakis, PhD, LRT/CTRS, LPC, BCB, Adjunct Instructor/LPC, Capital Biofeedback, Inc.
Ms. Judy Crawford, Executive Director, BCIA
Alexis Maxwell, BS
Aaron Craven, BS, LRT/CTRS
John Locke, BS, LRT/CTRS
Bai Barry, BS

Background: Psychophysiology and Biofeedback will have either a small or very significant impact within the upcoming tsunami of technological advances in connected health, mobile technologies, predictive analytics, virtual reality, health-related science, technology, engineering, art and mathematics (STEAM) education and outcomes research. Academic preparation of future practitioners and researchers is essential for psychophysiology and biofeedback to flourish in this new reality. A need exists for innovative approaches to education and research that include individualized education, experiential and entrepreneurial opportunities, multi-disciplinary collaborations and affiliations, and experimental and applied research and development experiences.

Method: This session will cover processes to help propel psychophysiology and biofeedback into the future by expanding its footprint in academia through the establishment of collaborations between students, practitioners, academic researchers, non-profit organizations, and private industry. An education model is summarized that involves a graduate certificate in biofeedback, on-line biofeedback course modules, and effective teaching strategies for sustainability.

Results: The examples presented will include beneficial collaborations among psychophysiological research, biofeedback education, performance enhancement, clinical intervention, and a health-related, STEAM education program for college students. Additional valuable content covered for the changing environment include the role of certifications and specializations as well as the need for standardization. For demonstration purposes, we will explore the rise of East Carolina University’s Center for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback from a “closet,” in one department, to a thriving and independent center in the College of Health and Human Performance.

Discussion: Preparing for the further integration of biofeedback education and research in academia, combined with strategies that maximize current and future opportunities in health care and performance enhancement are critical to the future success of psychophysiology and biofeedback. Participants will be engaged in a discussion to explore methods to increase academic practices to maximize clinical effectiveness. We will disseminate the ideas and concerns generated to the leadership of AAPB and BCIA.

Learning Objectives:

  • List three benefits of practitioner-student relationships
  • Identify two ways practitioners and academic researchers can collaborate.
  • List two ways biofeedback certification enhances education and practice
  • Identify two barriers to biofeedback’s success in academia and two methods to overcome them

BOS05 Children's Section Symposium – The Future of Biofeedback for Children
 

CEUs: 1.5
Track:
Level: Introductory
Focus: Clinical
Who should attend: Clinicians, educators, and researchers interested in an updating review of biofeedback in children and setting an agenda for enhancing biofeedback in children.

Speakers:
Dr. Lynda Thompson, PhD, ADD Centre
Dr. Michael Thompson, MD, ADD Centre
Dr. Richard Gevirtz, PhD, CSPP, Alliant International University
Dr. Jeff Bolek, PhD, Cleveland Clinic Staff Emeritus
Dr. Ethan Benore, PhD, BCB, ABPP, Head, Pediatric Psychologist, Cleveland Clinic

The Children's Section of AAPB seeks to education clinicians and the public about the benefit of biofeedback in children, as well as support innovative research to enhance the field and definitive research that validates treatment protocols. This session will review the current state of knowledge for several modalities, giving a case example to demonstrate the application of biofeedback in children. First, Dr. Gevritz will present on the combination of Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback (HRVB) and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Kids (ACT for Kids) for children with functional gastrointestinal underpinnings of FGIDs and the promising treatment protocols his team is developing. Then, Dr. Towne will summarize the breadth of evidence supporting biofeedback to treat pediatric Urinary Incontinence, Enuresis and Encopresis. She will review concepts of pelvic floor muscle retraining for maintaining continence and voluntary control. Next, Drs. Lynda and Michael Thompson will present on the application of NEUROFEEDBACK for ADHD, helping us to interpret the wealth of research in the field as well as the application to the individual child. Finally, Dr. Bolek will address the role of surface electromyography (SEMG) as a method that can help children ages two and older regain lost motor function (e.g., cerebral palsy, cerebral infection/stroke, head injury). Dr. Bolek will also introduce the progress made with QSEMG and the promise it holds for treating these children. Dr. Benore will then guide the panel discussion and large group discussion, clarifying the role of biofeedback for children and the direction AAPB should take to further this important work.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the underlying psychophysiology of Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (FGID).
  • Describe the Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback (HRVB) protocol to treat Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (FGID).
  • Describe the psychophysiology of pediatric Urinary Incontinence, Enuresis and Encopresis.
  • Explain the application of a SEMG biofeedback protocol for a pelvic floor dysfunction.
  • Describe the pathophysiology of ADHD as it relates to NEUROFEEDBACK.
  • Explain the application of a NEUROFEEDBACK protocol for pediatric ADHD.
  • Describe the pathophysiology of acquired loss of motor functioning in several pediatric conditions.
  • Explain the role of QSEMG and SEMG for motor control in children who have lost motor function.

BOS06 Optimizing Health and Performance with Mindfulness, Compassion and Biofeedback
 

CEUs: 1.5
Track: Hot Topics
Level: Introductory
Focus: Clinicial
Who should attend: Anyone who is interested in incorporating mindfulness and compassion strategies into their biofeedback practice in clinical and optimal performance settings.

Speakers:
Dr. Inna Khazan, PhD, BCB, Harvard Medical School

Biofeedback is a powerful treatment modality shown to be effective in improving clients’ health and performance. Biofeedback provides a way to work with challenging conditions in cases for which other interventions have been unsuccessful, such as chronic pain, anxiety, headaches, and trauma. Biofeedback helps improve performance for athletes and professionals when they feel hopeless in making progress. At the same time, biofeedback treatment itself can stall, leaving the client and the therapist feeling frustrated and unsure of how to proceed. These challenges include situations when the client is highly anxious about his/her physiological symptoms, feels pressure to “do things right,” becomes easily overwhelmed with emotional stimuli, or is simply too distracted to attend to the computer screen for more than a few minutes at a time. Oftentimes, these challenges are due to the clients’ unhelpful efforts to control the fundamentally uncontrollable aspects of their internal experience. Mindfulness and compassion based approach to biofeedback can help people experience change through mindful, non-judgmental awareness and compassion, providing the therapist and the client a way to work with what gets in the way of biofeedback success. In this talk, participants will learn how to apply mindfulness and compassion-based skills to their biofeedback practice in order to help their clients reap the benefits of biofeedback without getting stuck in unproductive attempts to control their internal experience.

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss the concepts of mindfulness and compassion
  • Introduce skills necessary for integrating mindfulness and compassion into biofeedback
  • Apply mindfulness and compassion skills in optimizing health and performance

BOS07 5 Slides in 5 Minutes: Psychophysiology in Sport Across 5 Decades
 

CEUs: 1.5
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Intermediate
Focus: Clinicial
Who should attend: Those interested in gaining insight into the evolution of psychophysiology in sport settings over the last five decades

Speakers:
Dr. Lindsay Thornton, EdD, Senior Sport Psychophsiologist at USOC
Dr. Viatta Sue Wilson, PhD, Retired, York University

In this 5 slides in 5 minutes format, various practitioners will share their insights from their work in sport across five decades. Practitioners from the US and Canada, who have used biofeedback and neurofeedback assessment and interventions while working with amateur, elite, professional and Olympic athletes will offer what has worked with athletes in their careers. Psychophysiology applications aimed at providing players a competitive edge in performance and recovery are more recently noted among National Olympic Committees and professional teams (Beauchamp, Harvey & Beauchamp, 2012; Blumenstein & Orbach, 2015; Dupee, Forneris & Werthner, 2016; Perry, et al., 2011). While the current attention to the field could make one think it is “new,” psychophysiology has had a long but slow maturation in sport. Presenters’ careers span from the 1970s, with technology was bulky and invastive, to present day, with an abundance of data available from wearables. ‘Early’ examples of work in biofeedback in sport (Wilson & Bird, 1979; Zaichkowsky & Fuchs, 1981) to ‘cutting edge’ prospects of QEEG data being collected during sport movements (Christie, Werthner & Bertolloe, 2018), will be reviewed in sequence, from past to present, taking the audience on an interesting and informative journey of psychophysiology in sport over five decades.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the maturation of psychophysiology in sport generally over five decades
  • Explain the limits of technology as barriers and practicalities to work in sport
  • Describe the utility of psychophysiology assessments and interventions in sport

BOS08 Effectiveness and Longitudinal Study of Light/Electromagnetic Neuro-stimulation
 

CEUs: 1.5
Track: Hot Topics
Level: Intermediate
Focus: Clinical and Research
Who should attend: Psychologists, Physicians, Physician Assistants, Social Workers, Education Therapists, Speech Therapists and Neurofeedback Therapists

Speakers:
Dr. Victoria L. Ibric, MD. PhD, Neurofeedback and NeuroRehab Institute
Michele L. Owes

Twenty-four clients, 10-86 y/o, volunteered for this study: participants, previously diagnosed and treated by their own physicians or psychologists for a variety of conditions, such as ADD/ADHD, LD, Learning Disability, pain syndromes, fibromyalgia, sleep disorders, post stroke, Post-concussion, asthma, COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, and memory dysfunctions, etc. Before the study commenced, a battery of subjective tests (DSM-V, Amen ADD questionnaires) were completed and medical history collected. Prior to the beginning of the study, clients were evaluated cognitively with the IVA-QS, Integrated Visual Auditory continuous performance test. In most cases, parents, spouses or close family members completed bi-weekly evaluations, to monitor the specific changes in client’s overall health condition and their progress. After each session participants completed a questionnaire. Neuro-stimulation sessions were offered 3 times a week, half an hour each session, for 20 – 40 consecutive sessions. The cognitive functions were re-evaluated with the same IVA-QS battery, as used at the start of the study, after 20 and after 40 consecutive sessions of Neuro-Stimulation. The majority of the participants (95%) benefited from the Neuro-Stimulation program obtaining remarkable physical, emotional and cognitive improvements. Objectively the IVA-QS showed significant and continuous improvements. No negative side effects have been reported. Conclusion: The Neurodynamic Activator™, as a unique standalone brain trainer, proved to be a useful device that benefited all the participants and the benefits obtained and reported at the end of the study, continued to be sustained 18 months later, after the completion of the Neuro-Stimulation.

Learning Objectives:

  • recognize the differences between Neurofeedback training and Neurofeedback enhancedby light stimulation
  • observe the power of light/electromagnetic stimulation at the physical, emotional and mental levels
  • utilize entrainment or dis-entrainment stimulating devices accordingly for maximum positive neuromodulatory results

12:30pm-2:00pm
 

Lunch Break (On Your Own)
 

12:45pm - 1:45pm
 

KEY03 Lunch and Learn: Turning Down the Noise: The SMR Story
 

CEUs: 1
Track: Basic Science
Level: Advanced
Focus: Clinical and Research
Who should attend: Persons with a minimum of a bachelor’s degree will benefit from this advanced introduction to our field. Those with graduate experience in Psychology and/or Neurobiology will benefit most. Physicians will discover the solid scientific basis underlying competent neurofeedback.

Speakers: Barry Sterman, PhD, Professor Emeritus, Neurobiology & Bio-behavioral Psychology

I started a sequence of scientific studies in 1962 which will be reviewed here. Each new step was informed by the questions raised from the previous step. Fortunately, my search for answers was significantly aided by the application of operant conditioning, first conceived of as a tool for identifying any EEG patterns associated with trained behavioral inhibition. We labeled the pattern found as the Sensorimotor Rhythm, or SMR, which has become part of the alphabet soup of EEG jargon. By bringing neurofeedback trained behavior under laboratory control it was also possible to study the behavioral and neurophysiological significance of this EEG pattern, which turned out to be primarily related to the status of the motor system, presumably tracing the balance between relevant excitatory and inhibitory cortical inputs, and facilitating sensory, motor, and cognitive processing. We have currently developed a new software program with Thought Technology Inc. to exploit this knowledge. This new program has allowed us to conceive of a new perspective for the future of neurofeedback. When we helped to start the “Biofeedback Research Society” in 1996 the work that Joe Kamiya, Tom Mulholland, Barbara Brown, and I were doing was called EEG Biofeedback and was based on operant conditioning. Others were also taking the same approach with muscle control, temperature regulation, blood pressure control, and a few other biological variables. In reality we were all pioneers at the time and had to learn as we went. Our current model of “the forest” has provided a digestible method for obtaining difficult to conceive details concerning system status and interactions in general and during the application of neurofeedback in particular. While the “trees” will ultimately be clarified, this approach finally makes clear to me what I am actually trying to do! Accordingly, I have decided to stick with operant conditioning. This is the tool that allowed me to blend my interest in both behavioral science and neurophysiology. And I am delighted to still be at it!

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will be able to articulate the basis of the SMR EEG rhythm, as well as understand supporting research, data, and applications.
  • Attendees will learn about critical and relevant physiological principles of neurofeedback.
  • Attendees will be able to explain how SMR informs clinical neurofeedback practice.
  • Attendees will learn an appreciation for softwarecharacteristicsessential for valid neurofeedback.

2:00pm-3:30pm
 

BCIACERT BCIA Certification 101
 

CEUs: 0
Track:
Level:
Focus:
Who should attend:

Speakers:
Ms. Judy Crawford, Executive Director, BCIA

Learning Objectives:

BOS09 Improving Lives with Applied Psychophysiology: From Epilepsy to Post-concussion Syndrome
 

CEUs: 1.5
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Intermediate
Focus: Clinical
Who should attend: Clinicians who want to fine-tune their interventions by combining neurofeedback with heart rate variability training.

Speakers:
Dr. Lynda Thompson, PhD, ADD Centre
Dr. Michael Thompson, MD, ADD Centre

Epilepsy was the first condition treated with neurofeedback almost 50 years ago and there is established efficacy (Level 4) for its treatment. Looking forward, post-concussion syndrome is an increasingly common condition and neurofeedback is looking highly promising as an intervention Both epilepsy and post-concussion syndrome are brain-based conditions that are not always well managed with standard medical treatments; indeed, about a third of people with epilepsy do not have their seizures well controlled with medications and up to 30% of people who suffer a concussion do not fully recover and instead suffer from post-concussion syndrome. With approximately 1% of the population suffering from epilepsy and 500 out of 100,000 people suffering a concussion annually, both conditions represent good opportunities for neurofeedback practitioners. This presentation will (1) provide the rationale for neurofeedback training; (2) give an overview of research; (3) describe appropriate assessment; (4) outline the training procedures for these two conditions; and (5) provide case examples. Candidates for neurofeedback who have epilepsy are usually the third of patients who do not have their seizures well controlled with medications. Clients with post-concussion syndrome (PCS) typically present at least two years after suffering traumatic brain injuries, so any spontaneous recovery has already taken place. Our experience is that clients with PCS can recover within a year of starting neurofeedback combined with heart rate variability training. The comprehensive assessment that will be described utilizes not only EEG measures (both single channel and 19-channel data collection) but also measures of heart rate variability (HRV), balance, and event related potentials (ERPs). The ERPs (also called evoked potentials) are a particularly important measure because they reflect brain speed and, though they are not directly trained, processing speed does improve with neurofeedback training. ERPs provide a very objective measure of those changes and strengthens research findings. Of course, the greatest satisfaction in this work is in giving people their lives back; that is, returning them to their pre-concussion level of functioning. Regarding intervention, we will describe the direct training that brings about changes in EEG parameters, giving examples from single channel training as well as from the newer LORETA z-score training. We will also provide guidelines concerning when it is appropriate to alternate single channel neurofeedback and LORETA neurofeedback. Methods for combining HRV training with neurofeedback in the same session will be explained. Results of balance assessments will be delineated and some screens used for training balance will be shown. Finally, we will hypothesize about why neurofeedback for both epilepsy and post-concussion syndrome may eventually attain Level 5 efficacy; that is, not only equal to the current standard of care but superior in terms of outcomes that can be achieved.

Learning Objectives:

  • Become acquainted with the solid research basis for using neurofeedback in Epilepsy.
  • List the components of a comprehensive assessment for someone presenting with Post-concussion syndrome.
  • Utilize a combined neurofeedback plus heart rate variability intervention for post-concussion syndrome.
  • Describe why using neurofeedback to increase the production of sensorimotor rhythm is effective in treating epilepsy.

BOS10 Presidential Symposium on the Clinical Efficacy of Biofeedback and Neurofeedback
 

CEUs: 1.5
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Introductory
Focus: Clinical and Research
Who should attend: This symposium is intended for professionals who treat psychophysiological disorders and who train clients to achieve optimal performance.

Speakers:
Dr. Fredric Shaffer, PhD, BCB-HRV, Truman University

This symposium critically evaluates the efficacy of biofeedback and neurofeedback interventions to treat diverse disorders and promote optimal performance. The presenters will describe best practices for each application.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will be able to critically evaluate the efficacy of biofeedback for the treatment of diabetes.
  • Attendees will be able to critically evaluate the efficacy of biofeedback for the treatment of asthma.
  • Attendees will be able to critically evaluate the efficacy of biofeedback for promoting optimal performance in music.

BOS11 Does Neurofeedback Work in ADHD? Results of the Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled ICAN Trial and the Role of Sleep and the Circadian Clock in ADHD as a Mediator of Treatments
 

CEUs: 1.5
Track: Hot Topics
Level: Intermediate
Focus: Research
Who should attend: Researchers, clinicians

Speakers:
Dr. Martijn Arns, PhD, BCN, QEEGD, Research Institute Brainclinics
Dr. Roger deBeus, PhD, Research Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina at Asheville, Department of Psychology

Objective: Meta-analytical data on neurofeedback (NF) in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) at the group level suggest large effect sizes for inattention and impulsivity and medium effects sizes for hyperactivity for both frequency neurofeedback and slow cortical potential (SCP) neurofeedback (Arns et al., 2009). A new meta-analysis indicates effects of neurofeedback are maintained at 3-6 months follow-up, suggesting lasting effects of neurofeedback (van Doren et al., 2018). In this study we examined whether NF has a specific benefit for ADHD beyond nonspecific benefit, including placebo response, of 38 sessions with coaching and encouragement to focus on a screen.

Methods: Children age 7-10 (N=142) at 2 sites were randomly assigned in a 3:2 ratio of active neurofeedback (3 times a week) using the Lubar-Monastra method to downtrain theta-beta ratio (TBR) vs. sham neurofeedback of equal duration, frequency, and intensity. Primary outcome (comparison of active vs. sham on parent- & teacher-rated inattentive symptoms) were analyzed by linear mixed model with repeated measures and site & siteXtreatment interaction entered. Sleep data included Children’s Sleep Habit Questionnaire as well as collecting sleep information at each visit.

Results: The planned sample was randomized by screening 329 children. Of these screens, 78% had TBRs > 4.5 by the Monastra-Lubar ADHD Suite, suggesting suitability of TBR-downtraining. Adherence to treatment was good, with 3 dropouts. There were 8 adverse events definitely related to treatment (eye pain, irritability, oppositionality, crying, self-injury), 5 probably related (headache, oppositionality, depression, crying), and 43 possibly related (both treatment arms summed). End-of Treatment blind guesses as to treatment assignment were correct 32% of time by children, 39% by trainers, and 34% by parents, none greater than expected by chance. Primary outcome (improvement in parent- and teacher-rated ADHD symptoms by randomized treatment) and sleep aspects along with other relevant findings will be presented.

Conclusions: In the first part of the presentation, primary clinical results of this NIMH-funded 2-site double-blind RCT of NF will be presented. In the second part, sleep aspects of the ICAN study will be presented as well as the role of the circadian system in pharmacological interventions.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the primary results of the ICAN placebo-controlled double-blind RCT of NF for ADHD.
  • Understand the safety and effectiveness evidence of blinding and sham control.
  • Understand the role of sleep in the etiology of ADHD
  • Understand the working mechanism of SMR and neurocircuitry involved
  • Understand the circadian pathway explaining inattentive complaints

BOS12 Addressing Opioid Addiction Using Advanced Neuromodulation Techniques
 

CEUs: 1.5
Track: Hot Topics
Level: Intermediate
Focus: Clinical and Research
Who should attend: Anyone interested in methods to enhance or improve the effectiveness of substance abuse detoxification programs. Anyone interested in neuromodulation.

Speakers:
Dr. Nicholas Dogris, PhD, QEEG-D, BCN, NeuroField

The purpose of this research was to determine if neuromodulation techniques (tDCS, tACS, tRNS and pEMF) have clinical utility on patients undergoing the first five days of a opioid rehabilitation detoxification program. 52 patients (39 males, 13 females) were in the “Stimulation Only” group and were compared to 45 patients (30 males, 15 females) in the “Neurofeedback Only” group. Patients in the stimulation only group demonstrated significantly more changes in the EEG in the alpha, beta, beta1, beta2, beta3, high beta and gamma frequency bands as compared to the neurofeedback only group that showed changes in the alpha band. The stimulation only group reported significant reduction in anxiety and improved sleep from day one to day five of the treatment program. PHQ-9 and GAD-7 Norm referenced scales showed significant improvements in both anxiety and depression symptoms. These results suggest that neuromodulation modalities have clinical utility on patients who participate in a detoxification program that utilizes neuromodulation during the first five days of detoxification.

Learning Objectives:

  • Develop a basic understanding of tDCS, tACS, tRNS and pEMF mechanisms of action.
  • Develop a basic understanding of the impact of tDCS, tACS, tRNS and pEMF on the EEG
  • Develop a basic understanding of opioid detoxification symptoms and medical interventions
  • Develop a basic understanding of how neurostimulation compares to neurofeedback in the first five days of detox.
  • Develop a basic understanding of how neuromodultation reduces symptoms of depression and anxiety in detox.

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