Thursday Schedule

Thursday, March 14
 

7:00 am-7:00 pm
 

Registration

 

7:00 am-8:00am
 

Continental Breakfast - Workshop Attendees ONLY
 

8:00am-5:00pm
 

WS15 Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback (HRVB): How To Do It, Why it Works, and For What - Part 2
 

PLEASE NOTE: This session ends at 5:30pm
CEUs: 7.5                                                     
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Introductory                                   
Focus: Clinical and Research
Who should attend: Biofeedback/neurofeedback practitioners, psychologists, clinical counselors, clinical social workers, marriage and family therapists, nurses,
physicians, and other healthcare professionals and academicians interested in utilizing heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback in their practice or research.

Speakers:
Dr. Paul Lehrer, PhD
Dr. Richard Gevirtz, PhD

This workshop is designed for biofeedback/neurofeedback practitioners, psychologists, clinical counselors, clinical social workers, marriage and family therapists, nurses, physicians, and other healthcare professionals and academicians interested in utilizing heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback in their practice or research. This workshop will cover 7.5 hours of the BCIA HRV Biofeedback Certificate of Completion Blueprint and will cover cardiac anatomy and physiology, respiratory anatomy and physiology, autonomic nervous system anatomy and physiology, heart rate variability, HRV instrumentation, and HRV measurements. Attendees will review the cardiac, respiratory, and autonomic anatomy and physiology that underlies HRV biofeedback. They will discuss the central role of breathing in diverse disorders like anxiety, hypertension, and chronic pain. Last, they will explain how HRV biofeedback restores autonomic balance and why this is important to health and performance. Attendees will be able to discuss the meaning and sources of HRV, and the correlates of low, normal, and high HRV. The presenters will explain the relationship between aging, disease, and reduced HRV. Attendees will be able explain how to properly use HRV instruments and interpret signals from blood volume pulse, electrocardiogram, and respirometer sensors. The presenters will survey the major artifacts that contaminate recordings from these sensors and show how to prevent or minimize them. Attendees will be able to describe and interpret HRV time and frequency domain measurements.

Learning Objectives:

  • learn how to explain the meaning of HRV, sources of HRV, factors that influence HRV, correlates of low and normal HRV, and the benefits of increased HRV.
  • learn how to explain the physiological basis of HRV and the blood volume pulse (BVP), electrocardiogram (ECG), and respirometer signals.
  • learn how BVP, ECG, and breathing sensors operate, how to perform tracking tests, and how to identify and control artifacts.
  • learn BVP and ECG sensor placements with regard to cultural sensitivity.
  • learn how to explain HRV time-domain and frequency-domain measurements.      

WS16 Stress: Molecules, Manifestations and Management: ISMA Certificate Course Part 2 - CANCELLED DUE TO LOW REGISTRATION

 

WS17 Using Biofeedback, Neurofeedback and Mindfulness to Treat Developmental Trauma
 

CEUs: 7                                          
Track: Hot Topics
Level: Intermediate                    
Focus:
Who should attend: This is a presentation to professionals who treat and interact with clients. The impact of developmental trauma is wide ranged, and throughout life. Understanding, be aware of, and learning different approaches to treat it, has shown to positively impact

Speakers:
Dr. Ainat Rogel, PhD, MSW, BCN, LICSW, Founder and Director of Boston Neurodynamics; Affiliate with the Trauma Center and The Trauma Research Foundation
Dr. Diana Martinez, MD, PhD, BCN, Founder and Director of Boston Neurodynamics
Dr. Bessel van der Kolk, MD, Founder of the Trauma Center and the Trauma Research Foundation
Dr. Inna Khazan, PhD, BCB, Clinical Psychologist, Harvard Medical School/Boston Center for Health Psychology

Developmental Trauma (DT) ) or complex childhood trauma is arguably one of the most important public health challenges in the United States. It has a negative impact on the mental and neurobiological functioning, leads to a lower quality of life and creates a substantial financial burden for the individuals affected, their families, and the healthcare system as a whole. The purpose of this workshop is to deepen the participants’ understanding of developmental trauma and its treatment using Biofeedback, Neurofeedback, and Mindfulness.

The workshop will provide an overview of the impact of DT on health and well-being, and research on the effectiveness of biofeedback, neurofeedback, and mindfulness treatment modalities. We will specifically focus on the challenges therapists may encounter when working with individuals with DT, and ways to integrate traditional therapy with biofeedback, neurofeedback, and mindfulness in overcoming those challenges.

The second part of the workshop focuses on physiomarkers and neuromarkers as a way of assessing clients’ baseline functioning, providing guidance for treatment, and tracking progress.   Overall, this workshop will provide participants with a more complete understanding of DT and ways to improve treatment outcomes through at integrative approach.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify developmental trauma
  • Discuss the impact of developmental trauma on the individual, family and health care system
  • Discuss research about the impact of neurofeedback, biofeedback, and mindfulness in treating individuals with developmental trauma
  • Utilize skills in working with the challenges of implementing biofeedback, neurofeedback and mindfulness with individuals with developmental trauma
  • Apply physiomarkers and neuronmarkers to assess the condition of the individual, suggest course of treatment and track progress

WS18 The Use of Neurostimulation and QEEG in Clinical Practice: Part 2
 

CEUs: 7                                          
Track: Basic Science
Level: Intermediate                    
Focus: Clinical
Who should attend: Anyone interested in Neuromodulation techniques in clinical practice.

Speakers:
Dr. Nicholas Dogris, PhD, QEEG-D, BCN, NeuroField

The purpose of this class is to develop an understanding regarding the use of tDCS, tACS, tRNS, pEMF and synchronized Neurofeedback in clinical practice.  An overview of each neuromodulation modality along with clinical research will be presented.  An overview of the NeuroField software platform will be conducted that will demonstrate how to utilize these modalities in clinical practice.  Participants will get a “hands on” experience with tDCS, tACS, tRNS and pEMF modalities.  Participants will learn the mechanisms of action in regards to tDCS, tACS, tRNS and pEMF and the research supporting these modalities in clinical practice.

Learning Objectives:

  • Develop a basic understanding of tDCS, tACS, tRNS and pEMF mechanisms of action.
  • Develop a basic understanding of the impact of tDCS, tACS, tRNS and pEMF on the EEG
  • Develop a basic understanding of QEEG analysis as it is applied to neuromodulation.
  • Develop a basic understanding of how neurostimulation compares to neurofeedback.
  • Develop a basic understanding of how neuromodultation reduces symptoms of depression and anxiety.

8:00am-12:00pm
 

WS19 Application of HBI database for defining functional EEG/ERP/ERD-based neuromarkers and constructing protocols of neuromodulation
 

CEUs: 4                                          
Track: Hot Topics
Level: Intermediate                    
Focus: Clinical and Research
Who should attend: Clinical neuroscientists, psychologists

Speakers:
Dr. Yury Kropotov, USSR State Prize Winner, Doctor Honoris Causa of Academy of Gdansk, N.P. Bechtereva Insstitute of the Human Brain of Russian Academy of Sciences

The workshop presents a recently emerged neurotechnology based on the advanced methods of neuroscience.  The neurotechnology is divided into diagnostic/monitoring and neuromodulation parts. The diagnostic/monitoring part of the paper describes methods of extracting functional neuromarkers from spontaneous multi-channel EEG, event-related de/synchronization, and event-related potentials (ERP) by means of blind source separation approaches, methods for constructing normative and patient databases, methods for comparing the extracted individual parameters with the normative data, and methods of pre-post treatment comparison.  Solid research of clinical neuroscience for demonstrating high test-retest reliability of the functional neuromarkes, high level of specificity and sensitivity for defining dysfunctions in ADHD, schizophrenia, OCD, autism, depression, and dementia is presented. The neuromodulation part of the workshop describes different types of neurofeedback (discrete and continuous infra-low frequency neurofeedback, conventional EEG frequency biofeedback), conventional and high definition tDCS, conventional and deep TMS, deep brain stimulation.  A special focus of the paper is on applications of the diagnostic neurotechnology for prescribing protocols of neuromodulation.

Learning Objectives:

  • the theoretical basis of a newly developed methodology of extracting functional neuromarkers from spontaneous multi-channel EEG, event-related de/synchronization, and event-related potentials (ERP)
  • the ways application of the methodology forpredicting clinical outcome in response to pharmacological medication
  • how to construct and monitor protocols of neuromodulation on the basis of neuroscience technology

WS20 PAY ATTENTION! How to improve functioning, from ADHD to Athletes
 

CEUs: 4                                          
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Intermediate                    
Focus: Clinical and Research
Who should attend: Professionals practicing using neurofeedback in clinical practice with clients who have attention difficulties

Speakers:
Dr. Lynda Thompson, PhD, ADD Centre
Dr. Michael Thompson, MD, ADD Centre

Improving focus and the ability to sustain attention is fundamental to dealing with problems such as Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and it is also necessary for having the mental edge in sport. Neurofeedback is established as efficacious in helping those with ADHD and there is clinical support for helping with symptoms found in those with co-morbidities, such as Learning Disabilities, Asperger’s Syndrome, Autism Spectrum Disorders, Post-concussion syndrome, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Affect Disorders, and movement disorders, (Tourette’s syndrome and Parkinson’s Disease). Assessment, which is crucial to getting the intervention right, will vary depending on the presenting symptoms.     Participants will learn how to do efficient and accurate assessments, either single channel or 19-channel EEG plus other measures. The assessment guides effective intervention for children, adolescents and adults for those with ADHD, those with attentional issues and co-morbidities, and athletes wishing to optimize performance. The intervention is multimodal and combines neurofeedback (NFB) with biofeedback, especially heart rate variability training (HRV). Clients can range from children who underachieve in school through to university students, executives, and athletes. Clients can also be entrepreneurs who are successful but frustrated by never getting their paperwork done and having difficulty listening in meetings. We will share the successful approach developed at the ADD Centre & Biofeedback Institute of Toronto over the last 25 years. 

Learning Objectives:

  • List and describe appropriate assessment tools.
  • State what the most common EEG findings are in those with ADHD.
  • Outline the contributions of assessment measures to the prescription of treatment interventions.
  • Describe the rationale for increasing sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) to improve focus and attention.
  • State a method for increasing SMR in patients who are hyperactive and impulsive.         

WS21 QEEG Guided Assessment and Neurofeedback for  Children, Adolescents & Adults with ADD and Autistic Spectrum Disorder
 

CEUs: 4                                          
Track: Basic Science
Level: Introductory                     
Focus: Clinical and Research
Who should attend: Psychologists/neuropsychologists, physicians, therapists, physicians/neurologists, nurses, biofeedback/neurofeedback clinicians, students, researchers.

Speakers:
Dr. Michael Linden, PhD, Attention Learning Center

This workshop will present the advances in the diagnosis and treatment of Autism, Aspergers and ADD QEEG analysis. The use of QEEG to discover which subtype of Autistic (6), Aspergers (2) and ADD (4) will be explained. We will discuss the similarities and differences in symptoms and QEEG patterns of ADD, ADHD, Aspergers and Aspergers. We will present the use of QEEG and continuous performance tests to guide and monitor neurofeedback protocol selection.  Neurofeedback candidate selection, protocol development and treatment decisions will be explained that lead to successful outcomes.  This workshop will also review a multimodality treatment approach for patients with Autism, Aspergers and ADD.  Pre- and post-neurofeedback QEEG and CPT case study data and research studies will be presented for ADD and ASD, including significant research in these areas and recent research on the effects of Neurofeedback on MRI and DTI with Autistic students.

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss QEEG subtypes of Autism, Aspergers and ADD and how they differ and overlap.
  • Apply neurofeedback strategies and techniques for Autism, Aspergers and ADD.
  • Understand how to use CPT tests and QEEG to monitor treatment effects of medications and neurofeedback
  • Use QEEG and computerized testing to guide neurofeedback selection and protocol development               

WS22 Using Electrophysiology to Enhance Treatment OutcomesCANCELLED DUE TO LOW REGISTRATION

 

WS23 Practical Interventions to Improve Health and Well Being in Adult Learners
 

CEUs: 4                                          
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Intermediate                    
Focus: Clinical and Research
Who should attend: Psychologists, educators, Counselors, Physicians

Speakers:
Dr. Angele McGrady, PhD, University of Toledo
Dr. Erik Peper, PhD, Institute for Holistic Health Studies San Francisco State University

The major contemporary physical and emotional illnesses are strongly influenced by the choices that people make, and the actions resulting from those choices. Most of these are chronic illnesses associated with poor quality of life and significant burden of disease. Lifestyle habits develop during the teenage period and symptoms, such as headache, anxiety and gastrointestinal distress emerge as early as the college years. However, these issues are rarely addressed, until the person demonstrates clinically significant problems later in life. Then, medical and psychiatric resources are expended to treat diagnosed conditions which may have been preventable or modifiable in their earlier stages. The adult learning atmosphere is an ideal environment for students and medical trainees to increase self awareness, gain skills to manage subclinical conditions and improve lifestyle habits. The use of social norms and personal feedback will be demonstrated as tools to motivate students to modify their behavior and decrease over reactivity to stress. Building resiliency, the ability to bounce back and to grow through adversity is critical to educational success at the undergraduate and graduate level. Students who are in good health physically and emotionally are able to use their intellectual abilities to the fullest. Similarly, resilient medical trainees make fewer errors, have a better quality of life and are less likely to drop out of the healthcare workforce despite long hours and intense patient encounters. The information and examples which will be presented in this workshop is based on the presenters’ extensive experience in the undergraduate and graduate education environment. We will provide evidence based models, practical examples and concrete instructions on implementing change strategies to improve lifestyle, decrease symptoms and improve overall well being in adult learners. These models educators/clinicians can implement in their universities or clinics to provide people life-long skills to mobilize health and prevent disease.

Learning Objectives:

  • Provide detailed educational health promoting and stress reduction programs that educators/clinicians can implement in their university or clinics
  • Describe the structure of a 14 session stress management program for college students
  • Explain the implementation of short, somatic, cognitive and behavioral practice to have the student experience how to induce symptoms and prevent them
  • Summarize the importance of self-care pro-health practices to prevent illness onset
  • Provide examples of lifestyle changes that can be accomplished by medical students in 10 weeks                          

WS24 BCIA Biofeedback Certification Exam Review
 

CEUs: 4                                          
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Intermediate                    
Focus: Clinical
Who should attend: Professionals who want to add biofeedback to their practice, preparing for the BCIA Biofeedback certification exam, or who want a comprehensive review of their knowledge.

Speakers:
Dr. Fredric Shaffer, PhD, BCB-HRV, Truman University
Dr. Donald Moss, PhD
Dr. Inna Khazan, PhD, BCB, Clinical Psychologist, Harvard Medical School/Boston Center for Health Psychology
Ms. Judy Crawford, Executive Director, BCIA

This workshop will provide an overview of the BCIA Biofeedback certification exam and how to study for it. A multidisciplinary faculty will provide a targeted review of key knowledge areas assessed by the exam, including ethics, efficacy, research, stress, learning theory, the physiological basis of biofeedback signals, safety, instrumentation, and normal values. This workshop is designed to increase attendee confidence as they prepare for the BCIA exam, provide focused review resources, and help them consolidate their learning.

Learning Objectives:

  • learn how to describe how biofeedback sensors work, how to identify and prevent artifacts, and how to mitigate infection transmission.
  • learn how to ethically deliver biofeedback services.
  • learn how to evaluate when physiological measurements are normal and out-of-range.

12:00pm - 1:00pm
 

Lunch Break - ON YOUR OWN
 

1:00pm to 5:00pm
 

WS25 BCIA Neurofeedback Certification Exam Review
 

CEUs: 4                                          
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Intermediate                    
Focus: Clinical and Research
Who should attend: Professionals who are interested in becoming certified in the field of neurofeedback

Speakers:
Dr. Lynda Thompson, PhD, ADD Centre
Dr. Michael Thompson, MD, ADD Centre

This workshop covers areas from the BCIA blueprint of knowledge and skills, information relevant to all neurofeedback practitioners.  Basic definitions and descriptions will be discussed. It will cover the highlights concerning the history of neurofeedback, research criteria for determining efficacy, efficacy levels of various disorders treated with NFB, basic neurophysiology & neuroanatomy (very brief) as these apply to assessment for biofeedback interventions, source of the electroencephalogram (EEG), instrumentation, procedures for assessment and intervention.     Method  This course is a didactic presentation that provides a very brief review of basic knowledge and will cover selected topics from the areas that comprise the Blueprint of Knowledge for specialty certification in EEG biofeedback developed by the BCIA. Goals are that participants will be able to answer questions on material that could legitimately be covered in a BCIA examination on EEG Biofeedback. For example, they will be able to answer questions regarding EEG data collection and instrumentation including: impedance versus resistance, differential amplifier, sampling rates, filters and so on and understand EEG assessment (one, two and 19 channels, brain maps, LORETA, data bases, EEG artifacts, normal and abnormal waveforms, common findings in disorders where neurofeedback is used). Methods for obtaining accurate data and interpreting this information will be briefly covered. Additionally, they will be able to demonstrate an understanding of how learning theory (especially operant conditioning) applies to EEG biofeedback, discuss basic neurophysiology relevant to interventions that use the EEG (including Loreta z-score NFB). Additional topics: ERPs, ethics, statistics, and so on.     Blueprint areas include:    Section I    Orientation:  Overview of Biofeedback, Neurofeedback and Learning  Section II   Basic Neurophysiology and Neuroanatomy:  Section III  Instrumentation & Electronics:  Section IV  Research:  Research Design with an emphasis on criteria for evaluating efficacy  Section V   Psychopharmacological Considerations:  Overview as it relates to assessment and training.  Section VI  Patient/Client Assessment  Section VII Developing Treatment Protocols: Fundamentals of Intervention: Choice of Electrode Placement, Channels, Bandwidths, and Adjunctive Techniques  Section VIII Treatment Implementation  Section IX   Current Trends in Neurofeedback  Section X    Ethics and Professional Conduct: very brief review    Results & Conclusions  Feedback concerning the workshop has been that it increases the confidence level and successful outcomes for people taking the BCIA examination.

Learning Objectives:

  • Outline methodology for EEG data collection and interpretation using common terms including:referential, sequential, and laplacian montages; active, reference, and ground electrodes, digital versus analogue recording, QEEG, LORETA.
  • List key facts concerning instrumentation terms including: impedance versus resistance, differential amplifier, sampling rates, high and low pass filters.
  • List and describe common artifacts including: eye movement, muscle tension, cardiac, cardioballistic, electrode movement,
  • Draw and relate key features of normal and abnormal waveforms
  • List common findings in disorders where neurofeedback is used including: Seizure disorders, ADHD, anxiety, depression, post-concussion.                            

WS26 Connectivity Assessment and Training in Developmental Trauma
 

CEUs: 4                                           
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Intermediate                    
Focus: Clinical
Who should attend: Physicians, research scientists, clinical HRV biofeedback specialists, and students.

Speakers:
Dr. Robert Coben, pHd, Neuropsychologist
Dr. Anne Stevens, PhD, Integrated Neuroscience Services

Based on the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) study (anda et al., 2006), at least one adverse type of event occurred in 64% of the sample and physical, sexual, or emotional abuse in at least 28%. The ACE study showed us that a history of developmental trauma predisposes such persons to later life problems including a greater risk of mental health, somatic, substance abuse, sexuality, memory, emotional regulation and partner violence issues. Teicher et al. (2016) have been able to show that abuse experiences alter brain development which persists into later years and that the type of abuse impacts different brain regions. This same group of researchers have demonstrated profund adverse effects on neuroplasticity and connectivity between important regions of the brain involved in emotional and social regulation. These often include regions of the limbic system, left frontal cortex and insula, and right parietal regions including the precuneus. Last year we (Armes & Coben, 2017) presented data on 69 subjects with developmental trauma using high density EEG. The findings showed significant differences with the DT group having greater power and connectivity anomalies, especially long range connectivity findings.

During this workshop we will focus on understanding these findings and brain changes that occur in children that experience these very unfortunate events. We will discuss advances in effective connectivity measurements from EEG data so that the learner will understand how such data can be processed. This will also include graph theory metrics for later pre-post comparison. From this we will present a model of coherence based neurofeedback training using four channel multivariate coherence training for trauma survivors. This is integrated with heart rate variability in most cases to assist with emotional regulation training. Outcome data will also discussed using this approach with instruction on how to implement such an approach in a clinical practice. Case vignettes will also be utilized to show how assessment, training, and outcome measurement may be used to maximize treatment outcomes.

Learning Objectives:

  • The participant will learn about research on developmental trauma and it’s social, emotional and brain consequences
  • The participant will learn how toconduct EEG assessment with effective connectivity measures
  • The attendee will learn how four channel multivariate neurofeedback is performed in conjunction with heart rate variability
  • The leaner will receive information of outcome and case data regarding progress with such approaches

WS27 The Ethics of Making a Successful Evidence Based  Biofeedback Practice
 

CEUs: 4                                          
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Introductory                     
Focus: Clinical
Who should attend: Both early career biofeedback practitioners and those who are seasoned clinicians, who wish to enhance their practice, will benefit.

Speakers:
Ms. Angelika Sadar, MA, BCN, Brain ARC
Dr. Diana Martinez, MD, PdH, BCN, Boston Neurodynamics

Elements of a successful and ethical practice extend beyond the complexities of mastering biofeedback software and hardware.  The instructors, who have each developed and sold successful practices in biofeedback/neurofeedback, will discuss aspects of success marketing strategies, patient orientation and education, assessment options, development of treatment goals, and patient responsibilities. Practice procedures, starting with the initial phone call,  ethical responsibilities, multicultural awareness, the use of forms to promote successful treatment/training, fee structure and billing, and decisions regarding the role of insurance in a practice will be among the topics covered. Both successful and failed cases will be presented to demonstrate how to ensure better success for the patients and the practice, with particular focus on using evidence based interventions to work with complex cases and cases that fail to progress.

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize when a patient's needs extend beyond your level of expertise and know how to address this concern.
  • Apply information obtained in the clinical and standardized assessment tools to develop an effective treatment plan.
  • List 3 biofeedback tools that can be used to facilitate assessment
  • Summarize the role of patient responsibility and be able to list 4 aspects of patient responsibility to promote successful treatment.

WS28 Applying Continuous Wearable HRV Biofeedback In and Out of the Office for the Treatment and Management of Hypertension, Depression and Anxiety
 

CEUs: 4                                          
Track: Hot Topics
Level: Intermediate                    
Focus: Clinical
Who should attend: Anyone interested to better understand heart rate variability and its application for the treatment and management of hypertension and depression.  Special consideration will be made to educating on how to conduct continuous heart rate variability biofeedback out of the clinic.

Speakers:
Mr. Yair Lurie, MS, RHIA, CHIMPS, WellAdapt

Continuous wearable heart rate variability solutions are now readily available to consumers.  By applying HRV biofeedback outside of the office, clinicians can help their clients transfer the training to the real world.   Throughout this talk, we will learn about the psychophysiology of emotions and hypertension and learn how to collect and analyze mobile heart rate variability data.  You will learn how to monitor hypertension and assess the benefits of mindful breathing and heart rate variability biofeedback on a person’s health. Special attention will be made to the underlying science of heart rate variability and various technologies that can be utilized to improve health and wellness.  Time will be spent to survey the wearable consumer oriented psychophysiological device market with practical advice on selecting equipment and caring for clients remotely.   The workshop will include strategies for conducting 24-hour continuous HRV biofeedback and monitoring, ways to introduce it into clinical practice, new reimbursement options, and methodological and research considerations.   Attendees will learn specifically how to integrate ambulatory biofeedback technologies into their practice to reduce blood pressure, anxiety and depression.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify how to use mobile heart rate variability biofeedback in order to improve hypertension and wellness
  • Attendees will learn how to control for confounding variables and design continuous heart rate variability studies.
  • Be able to explain the pathophysiology of emotions and how heart rate variability improves blood pressure
  • Understand how various types of behavior affect HRV
  • Learn how real time biofeedback in the workplace can reduce blood pressure        

WS29 Development of LORETA Neurofeedback and Surface Neurofeedback Protocols for Clinical Interventions
 

CEUs: 4                                          
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Intermediate                    
Focus: Clinical
Who should attend: Healthcare providers, clinicians, including but not limited to psychologists, social workers, physicians, and others who would like to employ the latest neurofeedback approaches especially LORETA neurofeedback which can target both cortical and subcortical generators of the surface EEG for the treatment of many clinical entities including ADHD, traumatic brain injury, addiction disorders, depressive disorders, anxiety, pain syndromes and many others.

Speakers:
Dr. Joel Lubar, PhD, QEEG DIPLOMATE, BCN SENIOR FELLOW, Southeastern Neurofeedback Institute

An important challenge in developing protocols for neurofeedback is the ability to track progress in a form that patients could appreciate as well as demonstrating statistically for the practitioner that significant changes have occurred. This is important whether one is using the simplest form of single-channel surface training, multichannel surface training or LORETA neurofeedback which involves all 19 channels of the standard 10-20 montage. The parameters that need to be included in developing protocols for surface training include absolute power and/ or amplitude, relative power, power ratios, coherence, phase, phase lock and phase shift. For LORETA neurofeedback is important to develop protocols and track progress for current density, phase, coherence, phase lock, and phase shift. This this half-day workshop will focus on methodologies for developing database fusion and symptom checklist based protocols for advanced LORETA and surface neurofeedback protocol development and advanced analysis of the data illustrated through new software. The presenter will demonstrate how to develop protocols through the LORETA and surface tracking programs. I will illustrate how to obtain precision in multiple protocol development tracking  of the progression of sessions automatically through graphical and statistical analysis.  This approach allows the clinician to develop surface and Laplacian protocols. Furthermore these methods provide the capacity to import protocols easily and automatically into the Neuroguide training system for neurofeedback.  The development of protocols is based on the quality of the raw EEG. If the recording contains artifacts due to muscle contamination, I movement, blinks, head movement and many other types of artifact the protocols developed flawed. There are now advanced methods which we will illustrate for be able to separate out many of the artifacts that could contaminate a quality EEG recording. This workshop will also provide illustrations from  case material illustrating results of training over many sessions and relationship between EEG measures and behavioral measures based on psychometrics, ratings and other patient derived information. A critical point is that a treatment no matter how well it looks during training will not be clinically significant unless the results are maintained long after the training has been completed. I will address this issue with illustration that with proper protocol development and integration of the neurofeedback with other treatment modalities long-term effects can endure.

Learning Objectives:

  • How to analyze the raw EEG, eliminate artifact and develop QEEGs which will form the basis for protocol development
  • Observe in a stepwise fashion how data from the raw and QEEG is entered into protocol development programs
  • See examples of how clinical protocols can be used to track over sessions EEG measures such as amplitude for different band passes, coherence, phase and other measures.
  • Discuss the integration of neurofeedback, and LORETA neurofeedback with psychometric and other performance measures
  • Illustrate how this approach will be evolving over the next decade with the goal being able to train structures deep inside the brain                     

WS30 Breathing is More Than HRV Training to the Rescue to Reduce Pain, IBS, Acid Reflux, Anxiety and Dysmenorrhea, Epilepsy
 

CEUs: 4                                          
Track: Clinical Interventions and Optimal Performance
Level: Intermediate                    
Focus: Clinical
Who should attend: biofeedback practitioners  clinician  educators

Speakers:
Dr. Erik Peper, PhD, BCB, Institute for Holistic Health Studies, San Francisco State University

Breathing and posture impact health, illness and communicates to others about ourselves. Breathing is a whole body process and is more than heart rate variability training. It also is a hydraulic pump to circulate lymph and venous blood in the abdomen, an activator of spinal movement, and affects the acid-base balance of the blood through hyper and hypo-ventilation. Through the use of case examples and experiential practices embedded within a holistic stress management matrix, participants will learn to recognize and experience subtle dysfunctional breathing patterns such as those triggered by the startle response, pain and defense reaction which include breath holding, gasping, absence of pelvic floor movement, shallow rapid chest breathing, and hyperventilation. The workshop describes the hydraulic process of breathing, the role of abdominal movement and the psychophysiology of hyperventilation. The workshop focuses on recognizing dysfunctional breathing and teaching functional healthy breathing patterns to support health and healing. This integrated approach which includes passive attention has been applied to facilitate the reduction of symptoms with test anxiety, panic attacks, chronic pain, vulvodynia, psychogenic epilepsy, POTs, dysmenorrhea, acid reflux and irritable bowel. The workshop will demonstrate biofeedback, touch and imagery strategies (e.g., abdominal and thoracic EMG for teaching diaphragmatic breathing; volumetric, posture and oxygen saturation feedback; guided touch for evoking passive attention and guided visualization strategies) to identify dysfunctional breathing that may contribute or maintain illness and teach strategies to reverse dysfunctional breathing and thereby promote health and healing.

Learning Objectives:

  • Summarize the hydraulic and biomechanical functions of breathing
  • Recognize dysfunctional and functional breathing patterns
  • Learn how to monitor breathing with respiration sensors and abdominal /thoracic EMG recording
  • Practice experiential breathing patterns to increase and decrease discomfort

WS31 Advances in Linking Symptoms to Brain Networks and Neurofeedback Protocol Design

CEUs: 4                                          
Track: Basic Science (All Levels)
Level: Introductory                     
Focus:
Who should attend: Clinicians, Researchers and students

Speakers:
Dr. Robert W. Thatcher, PhD, Applied Neuroscience Research Institute

A useful method is to view EEG potentials on a transparent scalp while simultaneously viewing the deeper sources of the EEG from inside the brain. The workshop includes hands on training in how to identify dysregulated brain network hubs and connections linked to symptoms. Both raw scores and Z scores are used as well as the Laplacian transform of the scalp EEG to produce Neurofeedback protocols.  Learn how to use swLORETA to examine networks in 3-dimensions and evaluate functional connectivity, phase differences and information flow.  Learn how to create Neurofeedback protocols and evaluate changes of symptoms and brain function over sessions. Understanding cross-frequency coupling from brainstem to limbic system to cortex including Neurofeedback protocol generation.  Cross-frequency measures such as cross-frequency phase-amplitude coupling, cross-frequency coherence, cross-frequency power and cross-frequency phase reset will be demonstrated.  Advanced Neuroimaging topics will be covered including the potential to resolve sources in the Thalamus, Sub-Thalamus, Habenua and Cerebellum. Implications and future applications of Neurofeedback including Cerebellar Neurofeedback will be discussed.

Learning Objectives:

  • Evaluate and assess brain dysregulation linked to symptoms
  • Use swLORETA to image EEG currents and connections in real-time
  • Develop Neurofeedback protocols
  • Form hypotheses and test hypotheses about likely brain networks linked to symptoms

2pm-6:30pm
           

Exhibits Open

5:30pm-6:30pm
           

Optimal Performance Section: Things that Go Bump in the Night: Sleep monitoring, the connection to psychophys training and interventions for the performance excellence

Speakers:
Dr. Lindsay Thornton, Senior Sport Physiologist, United States Olympic Committee

What happens after your clients leave your office can enhance or undermine psychophysiology training. Sleep is necessary for learning and growth, yet it is often left unexplored with clients. A simple "what is your conscious recollection of your non conscious state over the last week" won't suffice. Subjective estimations of sleep quality and duration are inflated. Consistent, quality sleep is an important part of high level performance in any domain. Practitioners trained in psychophysiology are well positioned for understanding objective sleep metrics, either through sleep staging via EEG, or examining HRV derivatives of sleep measures. Psychophysiology training can be enhanced with periodic sleep monitoring and setting appropriate recovery goals, and psychophysiology interventions have the potential to enhance sleep/minimize obstacles associated with sleep. In this meeting, Lindsay Thornton will share lessons learned from sleep monitoring and interventions in elite athletes during her career with the United States Olympic Committee.

6:30pm-7:45pm
 

KEY01 How Can We Improve the Rigor and Replicability of Applied Psychophysiology?
 

CEUs: 1
Track: Basic Science
Level: Introductory/Intermediate          
Focus: Research
Who should attend: All conference participants.

Speakers:
Dr. Michael Larson, PhD, Brigham Young University

Scientific results, including those from psychology, neuroscience, and across areas of psychophysiology and biofeedback, are facing considerable scrutiny due to a high number of false positive findings and meager replication rates. There are a number of factors contributing to poor replication; yet, incentives for improved research remain behind the need for enhancement. Applied psychophysiology and biofeedback research are not immune to questions regarding rigor and replication. I provide evidence for the difficulties currently experienced in scientific research, including applied psychophysiology. I then provide a series of examples and opportunities for improvement, including increasing sample sizes through collaboration, decreasing researcher flexibility, increasing measurement precision, strengthening reporting standards, and shifting incentive structures. I end with a discussion of registered reports and pre-registration and how these can be used to strengthen applied psychophysiology research.  The learning objectives for this talk are designed to help you: (1) identify the key features of the current replication difficulties and how these difficulties are seen in applied psychophysiology; (2) explain ways for improving the rigor and replication of psychophysiology research; (3) compare pre-registration and registered reports as ways to reduce researcher flexibility and “p-hacking” in order to improve applied psychophysiology research credibility.

Learning Objectives:

  • To come

7:45 pm to 9:30pm
 

Welcome Reception (Exhibits Open)

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